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  1. #251
    or TizYou?
    TizMe's Avatar
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  2. #252
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Please tell us, what? TizYOU.

  3. #253
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Another one. Billy Mays (the sales guy on TV that sells everything is dead).





  4. #254
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    I saw that but didn't figure anyone here would even know who he is?? dropping like flies ain't they?? And not that old either.. very distressing...

  5. #255
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    Another one meets his maker:Fred Travalena



    Impressionist, Vegas headliner Fred Travalena dies

    Mon Jun 29, 5:55 am ET

    LOS ANGELES Impressionist Fred Travalena, a headliner in Vegas showrooms and a regular on late-night talk shows with his takes on presidents, crooners and screen stars, has died in Los Angeles. He was 66.
    Publicist Roger Neal says Travalena died Sunday at his home in the Encino area after a recurrence of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that first surfaced in 2002.
    Travalena was known for the sheer volume of celebrities he imitated, leading to the nicknames "The Man of a Thousand Voices" and "Mr. Everybody."
    His act included presidents from Kennedy to Obama, musicians from Frank Sinatra to Bruce Springsteen and actors from Marlon Brando to Tom Cruise.
    The Bronx native started his career in Las Vegas in 1971.


    Impressionist, Vegas headliner Fred Travalena dies - Yahoo! News

    Geeezzz!!!!

  6. #256
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    I wonder if Ryan O'Neal will be among the next. Obama, anyone?

  7. #257
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    I reakon we are on Obummer's 3rd stand-in already

  8. #258
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    ^ Ah! Clones! No wonder he supports stem-cell research.

  9. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzy Bob View Post
    Obama is going to honor Michael Jackson all month in the US.

    Instead of having the American flag hang at half mast, all government agencies are going to hang a young boys undershorts at half mast.

  10. #260
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    By the way impressionism is fastly becoming a lost art, that is the second good one in just a few months and a few years ago Rich Little died who's left that does good impressions??

  11. #261
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    Oscar-winning actor Karl Malden has died in Los Angeles at age 97, his agent has said.

    Oscar-winning actor Karl Malden dies aged 97




    Malden was best known for roles in films such as A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront and Patton.
    But it was decades later when he gained a new legion of fans in the 70s TV series The Streets of San Francisco, in which he played widowed cop Lieutenant Mike Stone opposite co-star Michael Douglas's rookie Inspector Steve Keller.
    Born Mladen George Sekulovich to parents of Czech and Serbian origins in Gary, Indiana, he was famous for his trademark bulbous nose - a result of breaking it twice in his youth.
    At the age of 22, he changed his name to Karl Malden but often found ways of slipping in his real name Sekulovich in lines in the films and TV shows he appeared in.
    Having worked in the steel mills in Gary, he went on to study drama and eventually met his future wife Mona Greenberg, marrying her in December 1938. They had one of the longest marriages in Hollywood.
    After serving with the US Army during World War II, Malden starred in A Streetcar Named Desire in 1951, which won him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar, before playing a priest in On the Waterfront three years later.
    In 1972 he was approached about starring in The Streets of San Francisco, initially to be a made-for-TV movie but which went on to become a hit show.
    Malden also starred in a series of ads for American Express travellers cheques in which he delivered the famous line "Don't leave home without them!".
    Well, luckily I didn't have any tortoises on me at the time...

  12. #262
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    Actress Mollie Sugden has died at the age of 86, her agent has said.
    The TV star, best known for playing Mrs Slocombe in long-running BBC sitcom Are You Being Served?, died at the Royal Surrey Hospital after a long illness.
    The Yorkshire-born actress's twin sons, Robin and Simon Moore, were at her bedside, agent Joan Reddin said.
    David Croft, one of the writers of Are You Being Served?, remembered her as a "marvellous character" who would never turn down chances to make people laugh.
    "She would never refuse any sort of comedy situation. No matter how undignified it was, she would always go along with it. She was marvellously funny," he said.





    BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Actress Mollie Sugden dies at 86

  13. #263
    Hansum Man!
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    Architect of Vietnam War Robert "Strange" McNamara dies


    July 7, 2009
    The cerebral secretary of defence, Robert "Strange" McNamara, who was vilified for prosecuting the Vietnam War, and then devoted himself to helping the world's poorest nations, died yesterday. He was 93.
    Mr McNamara died at his home, his wife Diana said. She said he had been in failing health for some time.
    For all his healing efforts, Mr McNamara was fundamentally associated with the Vietnam War, "McNamara's war", the US's most disastrous foreign venture.


    May he rot somewhere nasty

  14. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Architect of Vietnam War Robert "Strange" McNamara dies


    July 7, 2009
    The cerebral secretary of defence, Robert "Strange" McNamara, who was vilified for prosecuting the Vietnam War, and then devoted himself to helping the world's poorest nations, died yesterday. He was 93.
    Mr McNamara died at his home, his wife Diana said. She said he had been in failing health for some time.
    For all his healing efforts, Mr McNamara was fundamentally associated with the Vietnam War, "McNamara's war", the US's most disastrous foreign venture.


    May he rot somewhere nasty
    Just waiting for Henry now....

  15. #265
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    I'd say that his age qualifies him for this thread..Major milestone indeed.

    Print Story: World's oldest man, WWI veteran dies - Yahoo! News


    World's oldest man, WWI veteran dies

    By DANICA KIRKA, Associated Press Writer Danica Kirka, Associated Press Writer Sat Jul 18, 2:10 pm ET
    LONDON Only death could silence Henry Allingham.
    He went to war as a teenager, helped keep flimsy aircraft flying, survived his wounds and came home from World War I to a long very long and fruitful life.
    But only in his last years did he discover his true mission: to remind new generations of the sacrifices of the millions slaughtered in the trenches, killed in the air, or lost at sea in what Britons call the Great War.
    Allingham, who was the world's oldest man when he died Saturday at 113, attributed his remarkable longevity to "cigarettes, whisky and wild, wild women."
    Jokes aside, he was a modest man who served as Britain's conscience, reminding young people time and time again about the true cost of war.
    "I want everyone to know," he told The Associated Press during an interview in November. "They died for us."
    He was the last surviving original member of the Royal Air Force, which was formed in 1918. He made it a personal crusade to talk about a conflict that wiped out much of a generation. Though nearly blind, he would take the outstretched hands of visitors in both of his, gaze into the eyes of children, veterans and journalists and deliver a message he wanted them all to remember about those left on the battlefield.
    "I don't want to see them forgotten," he would say quietly. "We were pals."
    Only a handful of World War I veterans remain of the estimated 68 million mobilized. There are no French veterans left alive; just one left now in Britain; and the last living American-born veteran is Frank Woodruff Buckles of Charles Town, West Virginia. The man believed to have been Germany's last surviving soldier has also died.
    "It's the end of a era_ a very special and unique generation," said Allingham's friend, Dennis Goodwin. "The British people owe them a great deal of gratitude."
    Born June 6, 1896, during the reign of Queen Victoria, Allingham would later recall sitting on his grandfather's shoulders waving a flag for King Edward VII's coronation in 1902. Transportation was horse drawn, coal was the primary fuel, street lighting was gas and in the financial heart of London, there was same-day mail delivery.
    But the world was changing fast. In 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright flew an airplane at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, and in 1913, Henry Ford began making Model Ts on an assembly line in Michigan.
    Allingham left school at 15 and was working in a car factory in east London when war broke out in 1914.
    He spent the war's first months refitting trucks for military use, but when his mother died in June 1915, he decided to join up after seeing a plane circling a reservoir in Essex, east of London.
    "It was a captivating sight," he wrote in his memoir. "Fascinated, I sat down on the grass verge to watch the aircraft. I decided that was for me."
    That chance encounter with an early flying machine was to change his life.
    It was only a dozen years after the Wright brothers first put up their plane, and Britain's air resources were primitive. Allingham and other valiant airmen set out from eastern England on motorized kites made with wood, linen and wire. They piled on clothes and smeared their faces in Vaseline, whale oil or engine grease to try to block the cold.
    "To be honest, all the planes were so flimsy and unpredictable as well as incapable of carrying large fuel loads at the start of the war that both British and German pilots would immediately turn back rather than face each other in the skies if they did not enjoy height supremacy," Allingham would later write. "But I remember getting back on the ground and just itching to take off again."
    As a mechanic, Allingham's job was to maintain the rickety craft. He also flew as an observer on a biplane. At first, his weaponry consisted of a standard issue Lee Enfield .303 rifle sometimes two. Parachutes weren't issued.
    He fought in the Battle of Jutland, the largest naval battle of World War I. He served on the Western Front, by now armed with a machine gun. He was wounded in the arm by shrapnel during an attack on an aircraft depot, but survived.
    After the war he worked at the Ford motor factory and raised two children with his wife, Dorothy. She died in 1970, and when his daughter Jean died in 2001, friends say he waited to die, too. His will to live was waning; his life seemed without a larger purpose.
    That's about the time he met Goodwin, a nursing home inspector who realized that veterans of Allingham's generation were not getting the care they needed to address the trauma they had experienced at the Somme, Gallipoli and Ypres and the other blood-drenched World War I battlefields. Some veterans ached to return to the battlefields to pay their respects to their slain friends, and Goodwin found himself organizing trips to France for that purpose.
    He encouraged Allingham to share his experiences and the veteran, even though he had passed the century mark, started talking to reporters and school groups, providing the connection to a lost generation some had forgotten. He found himself leading military parades. He was made an Officer of France's Legion of Honor and received other honors.
    He met Queen Elizabeth II and wrote his autobiography with help from Goodwin. It was called "Kitchener's Last Volunteer," a reference to Britain's Minister for War who rallied men to the cause. Prince Charles wrote the introduction.
    He grew accustomed to being one of the last ones standing. Last year, he joined Harry Patch, Britain's last surviving World War I soldier, and the late Bill Stone, the country's last sailor, in a ceremony at the Cenotaph war memorial near the houses of Parliament in London, to mark the 90th anniversary of the war's end at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918.
    As the wreaths were being laid, Allingham pushed himself up out of his wheelchair to place his arrangement at the base of the memorial refusing the help of an officer deployed at his side. He leaned forward and placed the red poppy wreath beside the others. Tears flowed.
    Allingham remained outspoken until his death, pleading for peace and begging anyone who would listen to remember those who died.
    "I think we need to make people aware that a few men gave all they had to give so that you could have a better world to live in," he said. "We have to pray it never happens again."
    Goodwin said Allingham's funeral will take place in Brighton. He is survived by five grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, 14 great-great grandchildren and one great-great-great grandchild.

  16. #266
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    ^ That is sad. But what a life!

  17. #267
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    Not sure if this should be in this thread, sadly today English Noodles number 1 ferret was killed in a Bangkok traffic accident


  18. #268
    Knows fok all
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    His not dead his sleeping

  19. #269
    On a walkabout
    Loy Toy's Avatar
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    ^ Or been out drinking with the French Prince or Mr. Brown!

  20. #270
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    Don't ferret lovers keep the furballs in their pants?

  21. #271
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    Frank McCourt Died

    Frank McCourt had spent many years working as a school teacher in the US, and enjoyed fame only after retirement with the publication of Angela's Ashes in 1996. The book was instantly popular with both critics and readers, winning a Pulitzer Prize and selling millions of copies. A film adaptation was released in 1999 starring Robert Carlyle and Emily Watson. He also wrote two further autobiographical works, 'Tis and Teacher Man.

    "Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood," was the unforgettable opening to Angela's Ashes. As he described in the book, he was born in Brooklyn, New York City, on 19 August 1930, the eldest of seven siblings. The family moved back to Limerick, Ireland, shortly after the death of his sister Margaret in 1935, when she was just a few weeks old.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  22. #272
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    Poor sod, he just inherited the title of oldest and last and then knocks off a week later..

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090725/...tch/printPatch

    Last UK veteran of WWI trench battles dies at 111

    By ROBERT BARR, Associated Press Writer Robert Barr, Associated Press Writer 1 hr 19 mins ago,

    who died Saturday at 111, was wounded in 1917 in the Battle of Passchendaele, which he remembered as "mud, mud and more mud mixed together with blood."
    "Anyone who tells you that in the trenches they weren't scared, he's a damned liar: you were scared all the time," Patch was quoted as saying in a book, "The Last Fighting Tommy," written with historian Richard van Emden.
    The Fletcher House care home in Wells, southwest England, said Patch "quietly slipped away" on Saturday morning.
    Prime Minister Gordon Brown said the whole country would mourn "the passing of a great man."
    "The noblest of all the generations has left us, but they will never be forgotten. We say today with still greater force, We Will Remember Them," Brown said.
    Queen Elizabeth II said "we will never forget the bravery and enormous sacrifice of his generation." Prince Charles said "nothing could give me greater pride" than paying tribute to Patch.
    "The Great War is a chapter in our history we must never forget, so many sacrifices were made, so many young lives lost," the prince said.
    Britain's Ministry of Defense called Patch the last British military survivor of the 1914-18 war, although British-born Claude Choules of Australia, 108, is believed to have served in the Royal Navy during the conflict.
    Patch was one of the last living links to "the war to end all wars," which killed about 20 million people in years of fighting between the Allied Powers — including Britain, France and the United States — and Germany and its allies. The Ministry of Defense said he was the last soldier of any nationality to have fought in the brutal trench warfare that has become the enduring image of the conflict.
    There are no French or German veterans of the war left alive. The last known U.S. veteran is Frank Buckles of Charles Town, West Virginia, 108, who drove ambulances in France for the U.S. Army.
    Patch did not speak about his war experiences until he was 100. Once he did, he was adamant that the slaughter he witnessed had not been justified.
    "I met someone from the German side and we both shared the same opinion: we fought, we finished and we were friends," he said in 2007.
    "It wasn't worth it."
    Born in southwest England in 1898, Patch was a teenage apprentice plumber when he was called up for military service in 1916. After training he was sent to the trenches as a machine-gunner in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry.
    The five-man Lewis gun team had a pact to try not to kill any enemy soldiers but to aim at their legs unless it came down to killing or being killed, he said.
    Patch was part of the third battle of Ypres in Belgium. The offensive began on July 31, 1917, and it rained all but three days of August. It was not until Nov. 6, 1917, that British and Canadian forces had progressed five miles (eight kilometers) to capture what was left of the village of Passchendaele. The cost was 325,000 allied casualties and 260,000 Germans.
    Patch's war had ended on Sept. 22, when he was seriously wounded by shrapnel, which killed three other members of his machine gun team.
    "My reaction was terrible; it was losing a part of my life," he said.
    "I'd taken an absolute liking to the men in the team, you could say almost love. You could talk to them about anything and everything. I mean, those boys were with you night and day, you shared everything with them and you talked about everything."
    Ever after, he regarded that date as his Remembrance Day instead of the national commemoration on Nov. 11.
    He and the other survivor agreed that they would never share details of the incident with the families of their comrades. "I mean, there was nothing left, nothing left to bury, and I don't think they would have wanted to know that," he said.
    Patch recalled being unmoved by the excitement that swept his village of Combe Down, near Bath in southwestern England, when war broke out in 1914.
    "I didn't welcome the war at all, and never felt the need to get myself into khaki and go out there fighting before it was 'all over by Christmas.' That's what people were saying, that the war wouldn't last long," he said.
    His most vivid memory of the war was of encountering a comrade whose torso had been ripped open by shrapnel. "Shoot me," Patch recalled the soldier pleading.
    The man died before Patch could draw his revolver.
    "I was with him for the last 60 seconds of his life. He gasped one word — 'Mother.' That one word has run through my brain for 88 years. I will never forget it."
    When he was wounded, Patch said he was told that the medics had run out of anesthetic, but he agreed to go ahead with surgery to remove shrapnel from his stomach.
    "Four people caught hold of me, one each leg, one each arm, and the doctor got busy," he recalled. "I'd asked him how long he'd be and he'd said, 'two minutes,' and in those two minutes I could have damned well killed him."
    After the war ended in 1918, Patch returned to work as a plumber, got married, raised a family and didn't start talking about his war experiences until the 21st century. He outlived three wives and both of his sons.
    During World War II, Patch volunteered for the fire service and helped in rescue and firefighting after German bombing raids.
    In recent years he and his dwindling band of fellow survivors became poignant, and much-honored, symbols of the conflict.
    At 101, he received the Legion d'Honneur from the French government. Last year, Poet Laureate Andrew Motion wrote a poem for him, "The Five Acts of Harry Patch."
    Last year he and two fellow veterans — former airman Henry Allingham and former sailor Bill Stone — attended remembrance ceremonies in London to mark the 90th anniversary of the war's end at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. The three frail men in wheelchairs laid wreaths of red poppies at the base of the stone Cenotaph memorial.
    Stone died in January. Allingham, who became the world's oldest man, died July 18, aged 113.
    At a remembrance ceremony in 2007, Patch said he felt "humbled that I should be representing an entire generation."
    "Today is not for me. It is for the countless millions who did not come home with their lives intact. They are the heroes," he said. "It is also important we remember those who lost their lives on both sides."
    The Ministry of Defense said Patch's funeral would be held in Wells Cathedral in the town where he lived. It said the service would be "a prayer for peace and reconciliation." The date was not announced.

  23. #273
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    Sometimes I think they holding on for the title.

  24. #274
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    seems that way at times...

  25. #275
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    Cory Aquino died today


    The former president of the Philippines died today. I remember the tumultuous days back in 1986 when she led a movement that turned out the dictator, Ferdinand Marcos. Those were in the early days of CNN, when wall-to-wall news coverage was still a relatively new phenomenon.

    Aquino's ascendancy was actually a pretty stunning turn of events. Marcos had been firmly entrenched for decades (and long had the backing of the U.S. government.) But, the widow, whose husband, Ninoy, was killed in 1983 upon his return to the Philippines (by the military), changed the course of her country's history in 1986. Assassinating Ninoy Aquino was a major miscalculation by the Marcos government and marked the beginning of the end. For news junkies, this was very cool to watch unfold. It was just great to watch a dictator fall because of people power -- and, of course, we soon learned about the shoes of Imelda, which added another whole dimension to the story.

    link: AMERICAblog News| A great nation deserves the truth: Cory Aquino died today

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