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  1. #2676
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    Might have to do a bit of downloading tonight....




    Joe Cocker: singer song-writer dies aged 70: agent
    Updated 23 December 2014, 7:10 AEDT



    Joe Cocker, the raspy-voiced, Grammy-winning singer song-writer, best known for his cover of the Beatles' With A Little Help From My Friends, has died his agent said. He was 70.

    Cocker was born in 1944 in Sheffield and began his trade singing in pubs, in a career lasting more than 40 years.

    His many other hits included duet Up Where We Belong and You Are so Beautiful.

    Cocker's agent Barrie Marshall confirmed his death and said it would be impossible to fill the space he leaves in his friends' hearts.

    In a statement, Sony Music said he died "after a hard fought battle with small cell lung cancer".

    "Joe Cocker was born 5/20/1944 in Sheffield, England where he lived until his early 20s. In 2007 he was awarded the OBE by the Queen of England.

    "His international success as a blues/rock singer began in 1964 and continues till this day. Joe created nearly 40 albums and toured extensively around the globe."

    Before making it big, Cocker worked as a gas fitter and covered Motown songs in pubs in northern England in the 1960s.

    He became known as a white soul singer and for his unique stage presence, twisting his body and face into contortions as he sang with his signature husky delivery.

    As a recording and touring artist in the 1970s, Cocker struggled with alcohol and drug abuse.

    He had a big hit in 1974 with You Are So Beautiful, co-written with Billy Preston.

    His career revived in 1982, singing Up Where We Belong in a duet with Jennifer Warnes in the film An Officer and A Gentleman, which won both a Grammy and an Oscar.

    He recorded his last studio album, Fire It Up in 2012.

    Cocker toured Australia several times, most recently in 2008 and 2011.

    News about Cocker's ill health was kept quiet until September, when Billy Joel performed a tribute for Cocker in New York concert.

    Joel said Cocker was "a great singer who is not very well right now" and who should have a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    In 1998, Cocker and his wife Pam set up the Cocker Kids' Foundation to help young people with education, recreation, arts and athletics in the North Fork Valley in Delta County, Colorado.

    Cocker died at his home in Colorado, where he lived with his wife. The couple did not have children.

    Top 10 US Albums:
    Civilised Man (1984)
    Night Calls (1991)
    Sheffield Steel (1982)
    Unchain My Heart (1987)
    Luxury You Can Afford (1978)
    Stingray (1976)
    Heart & Seoul (2004)
    One Night of Sin (1989)
    Cocker (1986)
    Jamaica Say You Will (1975)

    US Gold albums:
    With A Little Help From My Friends (1969)
    Joe Cocker (1969)

  2. #2677
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    blue's Avatar
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    Just looking for some good Joe Cocker flac vinyl rips but
    hard work with the pirate bay gone,
    best so far, 800 kbps version of

    With a Little Help from My Friends (1969 album)

    https://kickass.so/joe-cocker-with-a...-t7668141.html

    edit-
    Found a better version , a heathy 2700 kbps !
    ( best mp3 are 320) that kind of quality makes you feel good; just like the old records used to .
    try it .
    http://www.kat.wf/joe-cocker-with-a-...3765.html#main
    Last edited by blue; 23-12-2014 at 06:20 AM.

  3. #2678
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Might have to do a bit of downloading tonight....




    Joe Cocker: singer song-writer dies aged 70: agent
    Updated 23 December 2014, 7:10 AEDT



    Joe Cocker, the raspy-voiced, Grammy-winning singer song-writer, best known for his cover of the Beatles' With A Little Help From My Friends, has died his agent said. He was 70.

    Cocker was born in 1944 in Sheffield and began his trade singing in pubs, in a career lasting more than 40 years.

    His many other hits included duet Up Where We Belong and You Are so Beautiful.

    Cocker's agent Barrie Marshall confirmed his death and said it would be impossible to fill the space he leaves in his friends' hearts.

    In a statement, Sony Music said he died "after a hard fought battle with small cell lung cancer".

    "Joe Cocker was born 5/20/1944 in Sheffield, England where he lived until his early 20s. In 2007 he was awarded the OBE by the Queen of England.

    "His international success as a blues/rock singer began in 1964 and continues till this day. Joe created nearly 40 albums and toured extensively around the globe."

    Before making it big, Cocker worked as a gas fitter and covered Motown songs in pubs in northern England in the 1960s.

    He became known as a white soul singer and for his unique stage presence, twisting his body and face into contortions as he sang with his signature husky delivery.

    As a recording and touring artist in the 1970s, Cocker struggled with alcohol and drug abuse.

    He had a big hit in 1974 with You Are So Beautiful, co-written with Billy Preston.

    His career revived in 1982, singing Up Where We Belong in a duet with Jennifer Warnes in the film An Officer and A Gentleman, which won both a Grammy and an Oscar.

    He recorded his last studio album, Fire It Up in 2012.

    Cocker toured Australia several times, most recently in 2008 and 2011.

    News about Cocker's ill health was kept quiet until September, when Billy Joel performed a tribute for Cocker in New York concert.

    Joel said Cocker was "a great singer who is not very well right now" and who should have a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    In 1998, Cocker and his wife Pam set up the Cocker Kids' Foundation to help young people with education, recreation, arts and athletics in the North Fork Valley in Delta County, Colorado.

    Cocker died at his home in Colorado, where he lived with his wife. The couple did not have children.

    Top 10 US Albums:
    Civilised Man (1984)
    Night Calls (1991)
    Sheffield Steel (1982)
    Unchain My Heart (1987)
    Luxury You Can Afford (1978)
    Stingray (1976)
    Heart & Seoul (2004)
    One Night of Sin (1989)
    Cocker (1986)
    Jamaica Say You Will (1975)

    US Gold albums:
    With A Little Help From My Friends (1969)
    Joe Cocker (1969)
    One of the greats from the great era....
    RIP Mr. Cocker.

  4. #2679
    Member peaches's Avatar
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    Was on my honeymoon when he got busted in Oz, 1972
    oh!the memories, RIP Joe.

  5. #2680
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    Another Woodstock Vet bites the dust.

    RIP Joe...

  6. #2681
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boon Mee View Post
    Another Woodstock Vet bites the dust.

    RIP Joe...



  7. #2682
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Such a unique voice and so entertaining to see perform. Sad he is gone.

    I will always remember seeing Cocker on Saturday Night Live singing next to John Belushi, who was imitating his spastic movements. Was so funny.

  8. #2683
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    RIP Joe

  9. #2684
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    Just read it on the news - one of these 'oh no' moments for me.
    One of the all time best left us way too early.

    RIP

  10. #2685
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    A bit of a tear in my eye...

    RIP

  11. #2686
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit
    I will always remember seeing Cocker on Saturday Night Live singing next to John Belushi, who was imitating his spastic movements. Was so funny.
    Here you go Ma'am:

    Vidéo John BELUSHI // JOE COCKER - nissoup_ob - Musique

    Cocker looked about 50 then but he couldn't have been over 35 or so.

    Bonus: Lots of familiar faces from the Blues Brothers band in the back up musicians.

  12. #2687
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    His Mad Dogs and Englishman had any amazing line up
    Claudia Laneer,Leon Russel and many more


  • #2688
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    Joe Cocker my absolute favourite vocalst.

    Thanks Joe for the memories and RIP.

  • #2689
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    Joe Cocker, who has died aged 70, was a Sheffield-born singer who came to be considered one of the greatest white blues and soul vocalists.

    With a voice that could rage, bellow, rasp, screech or – if circumstance demanded – be unexpectedly yearning and vulnerable, he was capable of taking any song and making it his own.


    Cocker proved this conclusively with his first and biggest hit, a cover of the Beatles’ With a Little Help From My Friends. Replacing the Fab Four’s cheerful, music-hall arrangement with his own tortured reading, Cocker topped the charts and so stunned Woodstock the following year that he established himself as rock’s most incendiary white soul singer.
    It was a role for which he was perfectly suited. Honing his voice on a bottle of bourbon and 80 cigarettes a day, Cocker spent much of the Seventies in an alcohol and drug-fuelled haze. He reached the bottom in 1974 when the curtain was lowered on a performance in Los Angeles in which, having appeared in a vomit-encrusted jacket and cast-off jeans, he curled into the foetal position and was unable to continue.

    But he was a survivor, for whom hair, sideboards, beard and stomach might come and go while his voice, if occasionally croaky, never let him down. Returning to the charts in 1982 with the Oscar-winning ballad Up Where We Belong, the theme to the hit movie An Officer and a Gentleman, Cocker enjoyed an Indian summer of sell-out tours and renewed chart success.

    Cocker lived the stereotypical life of the blues. A wild man who earned – and paid for – his headlines, his career would have ended but for the majesty of his voice. He rarely wrote songs, but had no need. He had his own constituency. As Life magazine observed, he was “the voice of the blind criers and crazy beggars and maimed men who summon up the strength to bawl out their souls in the streets”.


    John Robert Cocker was born in Sheffield on May 20 1944. He left Sheffield Central Technical School at 15 to work as a gas fitter and perform as Vance Arnold, in which guise he supported the Rolling Stones and the Hollies at Sheffield City Hall.

    As Joe Cocker’s Big Blues he recorded the Beatles’ I’ll Cry Instead, but the record failed to register. After a tour of GI bases in France and another stint with the Gas Board he teamed up with the guitarist Chris Stainton, and formed the Grease Band, whose first single, Marjorine, dented the foot of the charts.

    It was the release of With a Little Help From My Friends that propelled Cocker into the big time. Claiming that he had worked out the arrangement in the outside loo of his father’s house, his trembling, tumultuous performance invested the song with such poignancy that the Beatles took out full-page advertisements in the music press praising his version.

    But Cocker’s signature was not confined to his voice. His onstage mannerisms – legs bolted to the floor while his hands, arms and upper body convulsed – caused him to be likened to “a dancer in a wheelchair”. When he appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show some members of the audience found it so distasteful that the singer was largely obscured by dancers.


    Despite this, America embraced his furnace-like roar. His first album, With a Little Help From My Friends (1969), consisted mainly of covers bent on the anvil of his voice into personal and definitive readings. Throughout 1969 he toured extensively, appearing at all the major rock festivals, including Woodstock, at which he gave a towering performance, cementing his reputation as one of the biggest voices and most compelling acts around.

    Joe Cocker! (1969), which included a turbulent rendition of Leon Russell’s Delta Lady, proved the valedictory outing for the Grease Band, who had become little more than a background to his vocals.

    But without a band, and with a touring contract to fulfil, Cocker assembled 21 musicians, wives, hangers-on, managers, roadies, children, a film crew, a spotted dog and a bus driver and set out across the States on the chaotic “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” tour, performing 65 concerts in 57 days.

    The experience, in addition to the cavalier range of substances Cocker ingested, so exhausted the singer that he was forced to return to Sheffield to recuperate. As the album Mad Dogs and Englishmen (1970) and its accompanying single, Cry Me a River, stormed the American charts, a desolate Cocker was dividing his time between his parents’ house and the pub, lamenting “the three o’clock break – that’s the endless gap between lunchtime and the pub opening again at six o’clock”.

    His only appearance, as he wrestled with his demons and life-threatening addictions to whisky and heroin, was a supposedly triumphant homecoming at Sheffield City Hall. But, singing alongside the Mad Dogs veteran Rita Coolidge, his performance merely confirmed that his recuperation remained incomplete, and 1971 passed in a haze. On one occasion he met Princess Anne in a nightclub and, temporarily confused, thought she was his girlfriend. It took a pair of policemen to convince him otherwise.

    He found the strength to resuscitate his career after seeing Ray Charles interviewed on television. When Charles was asked: “Who are the greatest living blues singers?” he answered: “Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye and Joe Cocker.” Inspired, Cocker returned to the stage. He toured America and Europe, but was forced to leave Australia overnight with six of his band members to avoid 18 charges, including assault, having already been fined A$1,200 for drug offences.

    Rarely uninfluenced by hard-core addictions, and suffering memory lapses, Cocker relocated to Los Angeles in 1973 and – when he could make it to the studio – continued to enjoy periodic chart success. By now completely incapable of writing his own songs, he remained such an idiosyncratic interpreter of other songwriters’ material that the omission was scarcely relevant.

    Despite his “foetal” performance before the press in LA in early 1974, Cocker’s voice ensured that the curtain never quite came down on his career. The tumult in his life may even have helped, both in the increasingly ravaged grandeur of his singing and in attracting songwriters keen to benefit from such a uniquely rough-edged, wounded instrument.

    If his behaviour tested the patience of his record companies beyond endurance, a series of albums – I Can Stand A Little Rain (1974), Jamaica Say You Will (1975), Stingray (1976), Luxury You Can Afford (1978), Standing Tall (1981) – performed creditably, as did the singles culled from them.

    And for all his troubles Cocker retained the affection of his industry. When he sang the Crusaders’ I’m So Glad I’m Still Standing Here Today – a song specifically written for him – at the 1982 Grammy Awards, he received a standing ovation and renewed record company interest. It proved a turning point. Up Where We Belong, his duet with Leonard Cohen’s long-time backing singer Jennifer Warnes, was propelled by the success of the Richard Gere/Debra Winger film An Officer and a Gentleman to become his first American No 1. It also won the Oscar for Best Film Song.

    On the back of this success he filled large arenas in the US and Europe, especially Germany, where his popularity had never waned. He enjoyed a triumphant return to Sheffield almost 10 years to the day after his last drug-fuelled appearance there.


    Attracting higher quality songwriters, such as Jeff Lyne and Bryan Adams, he enjoyed greater success. Civilised Man (1984), Cocker (1986), Unchain My Heart (1987), One Night Of Sin (1989), Night Calls (1992), Have a Little Faith (1994) and his last album, Fire It Up (2012), all achieved platinum sales.

    He also recorded songs for movies, including You Can Leave Your Hat On for Adrian Lyne’s 9½ Weeks, in which he turned Randy Newman’s sly voyeurism into a tidal wave of restrained lust. The singer observed: “I suddenly made a lot of friends. They kept coming over and wanting to see the director’s cut of Kim Basinger stripping for Mickey Rourke.”

    Renewed success brought a relative harmony to the singer’s personal life. Supported by his new wife, Pam, whom he had met at Jane Fonda’s house while he was living in Santa Barbara, he rejected heroin, forsook spirits for beer and, after a long struggle, overcame his nicotine addiction. He rejoiced in less turbulent times and bought a ranch in Colorado that he rechristened the “Mad Dog Ranch”. There he raised animals, grew his own food, opened a café and indulged his passion for fly-fishing.

    By now bearded, balding and portly, the singer was one of the music industry’s most celebrated survivors and was accorded the appropriate respect. He released occasional albums of “new” material, regular “greatest hits” and “live” collections and even covered his own covers. Capable of filling Old Trafford, he also performed for the Prince’s Trust and the usual flotilla of charity fundraisers.

    These included such occasions as Nelson Mandela’s 70th Birthday Concert, the Concert for Berlin after the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, the inauguration of President Bush and the Queen’s Golden Jubilee. But however civilised the setting, Cocker’s voice remained defiantly and magnificently un-housetrained, and his movements on stage as pained as ever.

    He is survived by his wife Pam, whom he married in 1987, and by a stepdaughter. His brother, Victor, was chief executive of Severn Trent.

    Joe Cocker, born May 20 1944, died December 22 2014

  • #2690
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue View Post
    Just looking for some good Joe Cocker flac vinyl rips but
    hard work with the pirate bay gone,
    best so far, 800 kbps version of

    With a Little Help from My Friends (1969 album)

    https://kickass.so/joe-cocker-with-a...-t7668141.html

    edit-
    Found a better version , a heathy 2700 kbps !
    ( best mp3 are 320) that kind of quality makes you feel good; just like the old records used to .
    try it .
    Download Joe Cocker - With A Little Help From My Friends [Vinyl-180g]-aks Torrent - KickassTorrents Proxy
    https://oldpiratebay.org/search.php?...t=seeders.desc

  • #2691
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    Jeremy Lloyd, creator of BBC comedies Allo Allo and Are You Being Served?, has died, aged 84.



    Born John Jeremy Lloyd OBE he was an English writer, screenwriter, author, poet and actor, best known as co-author and writer of several successful British sitcoms.

    'Allo 'Allo! ran from December 30, 1982 to December 14, 1992.

    The BBC show starred Gordon Kaye and Vicki Michelle.

    Lloyd also created Are you Being Served? alongside David Croft, which ran from September 8, 1972 to April 1, 1985.

    His agent said he died in a London hospital yesterday evening from pneumonia.

    Alexandra Cann said: "Jeremy was a great wit and always a mass of original ideas. He had a wonderfully original mind and will be greatly missed."

    Lloyd, who was married three times including to Joanna Lumley, created a string of hit shows with his writing partner David Croft.

    He was given an OBE for services to comedy in 2012.

    Accepting his OBE, Lloyd said he was "astounded" to be honoured for doing something he enjoyed.

    He said: "It is, after all, what I love doing and couldn't have done without the many wonderful actors, directors and others who made my work come to life."

    Lloyd had enjoyed a screen career of his own before he devoted himself to providing the lines for others.

    He made his film debut in School For Scoundrels and had minor roles in the Beatles films Help! and A Hard Day's Night, as well as classics such as Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines. He was also a regular writer on popular US show Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In.

    He and Croft had worked together on the Billy Cotton Band Show, contributing sketches, and were brought together again for a short-lived sitcom It's Awfully Bad For Your Eyes Darling, which starred Lumley.

    The two writers went on to work up an idea based on Lloyd's past experiences working at Simpsons of Piccadilly, which became Are You Being Served?, set in the fictional Grace Brothers store. Its run spanned 13 years.

    They worked on further shows such as Come Back Mrs Noah and Oh Happy Band, then struck comedy gold again with 'Allo 'Allo! about the French Resistance, which lasted the best part of a decade.

    Fans have paid tribute to BBC creator Jeremy after he died yesterday evening.

    Mark Gatiss wrote: "Farewell to Jeremy Lloyd and thanks for years of naughty laughs. It would be appropriate to insert a very naughty something here. Oooh!"

    And one fan added: "Jeremy Lloyd has died. This is dreadful."

    While another added: "RIP Jeremy Lloyd - The Fallen Madonna with the Big Boobies by Van Klomp shall remain with us always!!"

    In 1999, Jeremy Lloyd sat down with British comedy producer/writer Croft to discuss John Inman and the early days of Are You Being Served?

    They spoke of how popular the characters became and the show's origins.

    "We started writing the first one straight away," says Lloyd, after finding the right research material.

    "Something happened at the Olympic Games - there was an assassination - and our show was put on and we had 26/30million people watching."

    Jeremy Lloyd dead: Are You Being Served? creator has died aged 84 - Mirror Online

  • #2692
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    Joseph Sargent dies at 89; prize-winning film and TV movie director
    By STEVE CHAWKINS



    Joseph Sargent, a prolific director whose best-known film was "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" and whose dozens of TV movies included explorations of sensitive racial topics, died Monday at his Malibu home. He was 89.

    Sargent's death was caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife Carolyn Nelson Sargent said.

    Sargent made about 70 films, mostly for television. Some of his projects, like the 1997 HBO film "Miss Evers' Boys," a story about the infamous government study of black syphilis patients in Tuskegee, Ala., had strong messages that sometimes forced Sargent to tamp down his own strong opinions in the course of filming.

    "I didn't want to be in a position of commenting, politically, on the subject matter, because the subject matter takes care of it," he said in an oral history with the Directors Guild of America. "It's the same challenge that an actor has — and that I try to correct."

    "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" was a 1974 thriller about a subway hijacking. It didn't tackle social issues but gave viewers some heart-pounding insights into the deteriorating, increasingly violent and ever-sardonic New York City of the day.

    "As a young director, I liked to think of myself as doing only meaningful, substantive stuff," he reminisced for the New York Times in 2003. "I didn't particularly jump up and down, but it was a job and it was an exciting caper at that. So I thought I'd give it a go."

    Filming required eight grueling weeks in underground tunnels and an abandoned Brooklyn subway station. Sargent couldn't persuade image-conscious transit officials to let him film the city's standard, graffiti-riddled subway cars but agreed with them on not giving prospective terrorists any hints on how to halt a train.

    "What Marty Balsam does in the film, when he sets up all that paraphernalia to defeat the Dead Man's Switch, that's all Mickey Mouse," Sargent said. "That's not the way you'd do it. And I still don't know to this day how it's done."

    Sargent also directed "Jaws: The Revenge," shooting it in 54 breakneck days for summer release in 1987. Steven Spielberg took nearly three times that long to shoot the original.

    In rapid-fire meetings, Sargent "called me Doc and everyone else Baby," wrote shark expert John McCosker, a consultant on Sargent's film.

    "Doc, would the shark in scene nine take off the guy's arm at the shoulder or the elbow?" Sargent would ask in a typical session. "Terry, do we lose our PG-13 if the shark bites above the knee?"

    Sargent's Emmys were for directing "The Marcus-Nelson Murders" (1973), based on a true story about a wrongfully accused black man; "Love Is Never Silent (1985)," the Depression-era story of a young woman caring for her deaf parents; the mystery "Caroline?" (1990); and "Miss Rose White" (1992), the story of a young woman forced to confront her Jewish identity.

    He won comparable awards from the Directors Guild, whose president, Paris Barclay, said in a statement that Sargent "embodied directorial excellence on the small screen."

    Born to Italian immigrants in Jersey City, N.J., on July 22, 1925, Giuseppe Daniele Sorgente was the son of an ice-wagon driver and a seamstress. As a boy, he organized a neighborhood circus. He changed his name to Joseph Sargent early in his career.

    Sargent entered the Army during World War II and fought in the Battle of the Bulge. Several of his films delved into the war: "MacArthur" (1977), starring Gregory Peck, was a biography of the U.S. general, and "Warm Springs" (2005) was an HBO movie about Franklin D. Roosevelt's battle with polio.

    Returning to New York, Sargent attended the New School for Social Research and theater classes at the Actors Studio. Though he started as an actor, he soon was directing.

    "An actor does that when he finds he's too old for the parts he used to be too short for," he once joked.

    Sargent directed episodes of TV series, including "Lassie," "Gunsmoke," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and "Star Trek," before signing on for full-length films.

    With his wife, Sargent was active in the formation of the Deaf West Theatre in Los Angeles. Carolyn Sargent lost much of her hearing in a childhood accident.

    Sargent quit directing at 84 but taught part time at the American Film Institute and Pepperdine University.

    In addition to Carolyn, Sargent's wife of 44 years, his survivors include daughters Lia Sargent and Athena Sargent Sergneri . A previous marriage ended in divorce.

  • #2693
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    Lovely man

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Jeremy Lloyd, creator of BBC comedies Allo Allo and Are You Being Served?, has died, aged 84.



    Born John Jeremy Lloyd OBE he was an English writer, screenwriter, author, poet and actor, best known as co-author and writer of several successful British sitcoms.

    'Allo 'Allo! ran from December 30, 1982 to December 14, 1992.

    The BBC show starred Gordon Kaye and Vicki Michelle.

    Lloyd also created Are you Being Served? alongside David Croft, which ran from September 8, 1972 to April 1, 1985.

    His agent said he died in a London hospital yesterday evening from pneumonia.

    Alexandra Cann said: "Jeremy was a great wit and always a mass of original ideas. He had a wonderfully original mind and will be greatly missed."

    Lloyd, who was married three times including to Joanna Lumley, created a string of hit shows with his writing partner David Croft.

    He was given an OBE for services to comedy in 2012.

    Accepting his OBE, Lloyd said he was "astounded" to be honoured for doing something he enjoyed.

    He said: "It is, after all, what I love doing and couldn't have done without the many wonderful actors, directors and others who made my work come to life."

    Lloyd had enjoyed a screen career of his own before he devoted himself to providing the lines for others.

    He made his film debut in School For Scoundrels and had minor roles in the Beatles films Help! and A Hard Day's Night, as well as classics such as Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines. He was also a regular writer on popular US show Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In.

    He and Croft had worked together on the Billy Cotton Band Show, contributing sketches, and were brought together again for a short-lived sitcom It's Awfully Bad For Your Eyes Darling, which starred Lumley.

    The two writers went on to work up an idea based on Lloyd's past experiences working at Simpsons of Piccadilly, which became Are You Being Served?, set in the fictional Grace Brothers store. Its run spanned 13 years.

    They worked on further shows such as Come Back Mrs Noah and Oh Happy Band, then struck comedy gold again with 'Allo 'Allo! about the French Resistance, which lasted the best part of a decade.

    Fans have paid tribute to BBC creator Jeremy after he died yesterday evening.

    Mark Gatiss wrote: "Farewell to Jeremy Lloyd and thanks for years of naughty laughs. It would be appropriate to insert a very naughty something here. Oooh!"

    And one fan added: "Jeremy Lloyd has died. This is dreadful."

    While another added: "RIP Jeremy Lloyd - The Fallen Madonna with the Big Boobies by Van Klomp shall remain with us always!!"

    In 1999, Jeremy Lloyd sat down with British comedy producer/writer Croft to discuss John Inman and the early days of Are You Being Served?

    They spoke of how popular the characters became and the show's origins.

    "We started writing the first one straight away," says Lloyd, after finding the right research material.

    "Something happened at the Olympic Games - there was an assassination - and our show was put on and we had 26/30million people watching."

    Jeremy Lloyd dead: Are You Being Served? creator has died aged 84 - Mirror Online
    He gave me the best glass of Port I ever tasted outside of the Port institute,a lovely kind man

  • #2694
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    There's a Port institute?

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    Ellie mae Clampett from the Beverly hillbillies has died.
    Donna Douglas has turned up her toes at 81,think it only leaves Jethro alive out of the show, have to admit she would never be thrown out of a soi bar for carrying a bag of sausages

  • #2696
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    Stuart Scott, ESPN anchor, dies at age of 49

    ESPN sportscaster Stuart Scott was known for his charismatic coverage of the NFL and NBA. But even while keeping millions of sports fans happy, Scott was battling a rare and often deadly type of cancer.

    On Sunday, Scott lost a long battle with appendiceal cancer. Cancer of the appendix is so rare that the American Cancer Society doesn't currently put out estimates on how often it happens and death rates for the disease.

    The appendix is a small tube-shaped organ that measures about four inches and is attached to the intestines. Because the appendix is attached the colon it is classified as a type of colorectal cancer. According to some estimates, fewer than 1,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed each year with this type of cancer.

    According to data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database program of the National Cancer Institute, incidence rates of this type of cancer have doubled since the mid-1990s, but this may be due to improved detection and earlier diagnosis of patients.



    Remembering ESPN anchor Stuart Scott
    In 2007, Scott began experiencing stomach pains and was rushed to the hospital, where he underwent an emergency appendectomy and was diagnosed with the disease. Frequently, a ruptured appendix is one of the first symptoms patients with this type of cancer experience. Scott also had surgery to remove a portion of his colon and several lymph nodes. His treatment appeared to be a success, but the cancer returned in 2011, and then again in 2013.

    "It recently came back a third time," Scott told Men's Health magazine in 2013. "To be honest, I'm scared. I've always been afraid of cancer, but this time feels different. My confidence is shaken. I'm a little more vulnerable, a little more aware of my mortality, a little more uncertain about my future."

    If caught early, appendiceal cancer is often highly treatable. According to MD Anderson Cancer Center, 85 percent of patients with carcinoid tumors of the appendix have a five-year survival rate. The prognosis of a patient depends largely on the size of the tumor, as well as whether the cancer has spread. Appendix tumors that are two centimeters or smaller in diameter are less likely to spread than those larger than two and a half centimeters, which require more aggressive treatment.

    Treatment for this type of cancer includes removal of small carcinoids, a type of slow-growing neuroendocrine tumor. Sometimes doctors will remove all organs surrounding the appendix, a procedure known as debulking surgery, to prevent the cancer from returning. This is typically recommended for patients in the later stage of the disease. In many instances, doctors will also infuse chemotherapy directly into the space that separates the organs in the abdominal cavity from the abdominal wall. A patient is likely to also receive additional chemotherapy over a longer course of time.

    Researchers don't know what factors may put a person at higher risk for appendiceal cancer. Most likely, in most cases it is simply a bad hand of genetics.

    Stuart is not the first public figure to be lost to this disease. In 1993, beloved actress Audrey Hepburn died at age 63 after a battle with appendiceal cancer.

  • #2697
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    We missed this guy in November :

    A SCOT who became Britain’s most decorated soldier for his audacious exploits during the Second World War – which included single-handedly forcing a column of German troops and SS Panzer tanks to surrender – has died at the age 94.

    Sir Tommy Macpherson, who fought with No 11 (Scottish) Commando in Europe, and was awarded the Military Cross three times, the Croix de Guerre three times and the Legion d’Honneur, died on Thursday.

    He is among the former servicemen and women who will be honoured tomorrow in a host of Remembrance Sunday events in towns, cities and villages across Scotland.
    Renowned for his bravery, Edinburgh-born Sir Tommy was only 23 when he was part of a forward party in occupied France ahead of D Day. He caused so much damage to German military infrastructure that they placed a massive price of 300,000 francs on his head.

    His most fearless act came during the same deployment. He confronted the leader of a 23,000-strong column of battle-hardened troops, led by an SS Panzer division, persuaded them they were outnumbered and outgunned by Allied forces, and forced them to surrender.

    After two years in captivity, he made his final break for freedom, helped by a black marketeer and the Polish resistance, and covered 300 miles of enemy territory before stowing away on a coal ship bound for neutral Sweden, then heading back home to Scotland.
    Rob Ritchie, chairman of the community council in Newtonmore, Inverness-shire, the village where he lived, said: “Sir Tommy died in hospital in Inverness on Thursday.

    “He was always adventurous and would walk the hills in his kilt. Weather meant nothing to him. In the last few years, he was in a wheelchair but was always out with his carers. He will be a big loss to the village.”


    Tommy Macpherson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Scots war hero Sir Tommy Macpherson dies at 94 - The Scotsman

  • #2698
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    Rod Taylor, star of The Birds, The Time Machine, dies aged 84

    Australian actor Rod Taylor, who starred in Alfred Hitchcock's thriller The Birds, has died aged 84, according to reports in the US.


    Taylor, who lived in the United States, is said to have died at his home in Los Angeles after a dinner party.

    He came to prominence in the 1960s, starring alongside Hollywood greats like Jane Fonda and Richard Burton.

    In 2009, he made a cameo as ex-UK Prime Minister Winston Churchill in Quentin Tarantino's film Inglourious Basterds.

    He got his first leading role in the 1960 adaptation of HG Wells' science-fiction classic The Time Machine and went on to star in several hit films in the 1960s and 1970s.

    He also voiced one of the Dalmatian dogs in Disney's animated hit 101 Dalmatians.

    Tippi Hedren, his co-star in The Birds, told People magazine that Taylor had been "a great pal to me and a real strength".

    "He was one of the most fun people I have ever met, thoughtful and classy. There was everything good in that man," she said.

    He was due to turn 85 on Sunday.

    He is survived by spouse Carol Kikumura and daughter Felicia Rodrica Sturt Taylor, a TV presenter in the US.

    BBC News - Rod Taylor, star of The Birds, dies aged 84

  • #2699
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    Sad, but a good innings

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    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^ Have to agree. Get to a ripe old age, have a nice dinner at home with your friends, then drop dead afterwards. No hanging out in a nursing home or hooked up to machines in the hospital.

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