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  1. #2526
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
    slackula's Avatar
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    Sad about Jaws, he was a very cool Bond baddie.

  2. #2527
    I am in Jail
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    Quote Originally Posted by quimbian corholla View Post
    Sad about Jaws, he was a very cool Bond baddie.
    Wasn't he also Lurch in the Adams Family?

  3. #2528
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    no, lurch was ted cassidy,still a classic show.

  4. #2529
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    Sir Donald Sinden: Legendary actor dies aged 90



    Sir Donald Sinden most recently appeared on television as Sir Joseph Channing in Judge John Deed

    Theatre, film and TV actor Sir Donald Sinden has died at his home aged 90 following a long illness, his son has confirmed.

    He made his name on stage as a Shakespearean actor and appeared in more than 70 film and TV productions.

    He had been suffering from prostate cancer for several years, and died of the disease at his home in Kent.

    Sir Donald's family described his death as a "huge loss" and asked for their privacy to be respected.

    He was appointed a CBE in 1979 and then knighted in 1997 for his services to drama.



    The veteran actor often performed Shakespeare on stage and television

    Although renowned for his theatre work, he was arguably best known to the masses for his TV appearances - in the sitcom Never the Twain and the BBC crime drama Judge John Deed.

    His son, actor Marc Sinden, said that his career was "probably unique in our business".

    "He worked out that he only had a total of five weeks' unemployment between 1942 and 2008," said Mr Sinden of his father.

    "Even though his death was expected, it is still a huge loss to his family and we, his brother, his son, his four grandchildren and great-grandchild will all miss his humour and knowledge.

    "We would all like to share our appreciation for the Pilgrims Hospice and the carers that looked after him and us with such dignity, consideration and care until the end."

    According to Marc Sinden, Sir Donald was the last person living to have known Oscar Wilde's lover Lord Alfred Douglas and was one of only two people to attend his funeral.

    Sir Donald trained at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Arts in London.

    He made his film debut in 1953 with The Cruel Sea and went on to make about 30 films.

    He also performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company in leading roles such as King Lear and Malvolio in Twelfth Night.

    Sir Roger Moore was among those to pay tribute to "a wonderful actor" with whom he had worked on 1975 film That Lucky Touch.

    "Sad to wake up to news another mate has left us," wrote the former James Bond star on Twitter. "Awful week."

  5. #2530
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Whoops two actors again.....

  6. #2531
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    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88




    BY ASSOCIATED PRESS SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 8:26 AM


    DUBLIN — The Rev. Ian Paisley, the divisive Protestant firebrand who devoted his life to thwarting compromise with Catholics in Northern Ireland only to become a pivotal peacemaker in his twilight years, died Friday in Belfast, his wife said. He was 88.

    Paisley was Northern Ireland’s most polarizing politician throughout its three decades of civil strife, during which the evangelist’s blistering oratory was often blamed for fueling the bloodshed that claimed 3,700 lives.

    Yet at the zenith of his peace-wrecking powers, Paisley in 2007 stunned the world by delivering the province’s first stable unity government between its British Protestants and its Irish Catholics. “Dr. No,” as he was widely known, finally said yes – and his powerful U-turn cemented a peace process that he had done so much to frustrate.

    From the conflict in Northern Ireland’s earliest days, Paisley prophesied damnation for any Protestant politician or church leader who dared to build bridges with the Catholic Church and Irish nationalists. Mainstream Protestant leaders in turn sought to dismiss Paisley as a bigoted crank.

    Hostile to the establishment, Paisley built his own extremist power base. His evangelical sect, the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster, labeled the pope as the antichrist and called the major Protestant denominations ecumenical Judases. His Democratic Unionist Party insisted that Northern Ireland’s union with Britain could not tolerate concessions to Irish nationalist demands.

    Often backed by the brooding menace of Protestant mobs and masked men, Paisley led club-wielding blockades of 1960s Catholic civil rights marches, demanded the military destruction of a resurgent Irish Republican Army, and denounced the U.S.-brokered Good Friday peace accord of 1998 as a surrender to “the men of blood” in the IRA’s Sinn Fein party.

    Protestants rallied behind him with such fervor that no political initiative could last without his support. Over and over, he claimed the political scalps of compromise-minded Protestant leaders from the rival Ulster Unionist Party.

    In 1973, Ulster Unionist leaders cut a peace deal with moderate Catholics and the Irish government that foreshadowed the ultimate success of the Good Friday peace accord a quarter-century later. But Paisley worked with Ulster Unionist hard-liners and Protestant paramilitary groups to bring Northern Ireland to a standstill. Roads were blocked, electricity was cut off, and the fledgling Protestant-Catholic administration collapsed in May 1974.

    Paisley perennially reaffirmed his status as Northern Ireland’s most popular politician, topping more than a dozen votes in elections to the British and European parliaments, where he held seats simultaneously in London and Brussels for a quarter-century.

    Friend and foe alike called him “the big man” in recognition of his broad-shouldered, 6-foot-3 (1.9-meter-tall) frame, oversized facial features and superhuman lungs that, even late in life, allowed him to outshout opponents.

    To many Catholics, he was the figure they most loved to hate. This reflected, partly, their recognition of his unflagging energy. They also understood that Paisley’s most notorious outbursts – his violent language, his 1988 heckling of Pope John Paul II – encouraged outsiders to sympathize with the Catholic side of the conflict.

    Indeed, Protestant rivals frequently described Paisley as the IRA’s best recruiting sergeant. The IRA seemed to agree. The underground organization killed or maimed dozens of Protestant politicians, but never made an attempt to assassinate him.

    Paisley always enjoyed a stronger personal following than his Democratic Unionists could muster as a party. Throughout the years of bloodshed, Paisley’s party served as a thorn in the side to the Ulster Unionists, the party that forged Northern Ireland as a Protestant-majority state in the 1920s as the Catholic rest of Ireland won independence from Britain.

    An IRA cease-fire in 1997 opened the door for the Catholic-based Sinn Fein party to enter talks on Northern Ireland’s future in negotiations overseen by former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell. While the Ulster Unionists stayed at the table, Paisley’s DUP bolted for the exit.

    Mitchell considered Paisley’s voluntarily exile an essential ingredient for reaching the Good Friday peace accord of April 10, 1998. Had the Democratic Unionists “stayed and fought from within, there would have been no agreement,” Mitchell wrote in his memoir.

    But even as the British, Irish and U.S. governments sought to marginalize Paisley, excluding him from subsequent talks, his appeal surged amid the chronic political crises that followed the accord.

    The pact called for Sinn Fein to receive seats in a coalition government, and for the IRA to disarm fully by mid-2000 but didn’t explicitly link those mutually reinforcing goals.

    When the IRA insisted it wouldn’t surrender even a single bullet and raised doubts about its cease-fire commitments, Paisley crowed he’d been vindicated and the Ulster Unionist-led government suffered irreparable damage.

    Months later, in 2003, Paisley’s party won most seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly. Protestants had given Paisley an absolute veto over any resumption of cooperation with Sinn Fein, an apparent Doomsday scenario for power-sharing.

    Paisley declared there wasn’t “a snowball’s chance in Hell” he’d work with Sinn Fein unless the IRA surrendered all weapons and disbanded publicly. Upping the ante, he called on Sinn Fein leaders to don “sackcloth and ashes,” an Old Testament ritual for demonstrating repentance and shame.

    Paisley seemed determined to humiliate his enemies – yet this time his unbending reputation suited the cause of lasting peace.

    The IRA in 2005 disarmed and renounced violence, transforming its truce from open-ended to permanent. Sinn Fein in January 2007 voted to support the police, accepting the legitimacy of the Northern Ireland state for the first time.

    Even then, Paisley demanded more. He called on Sinn Fein leaders to confess to police all the unsolved IRA crimes they and their colleagues had committed.

    When the Democratic Unionists increased their Assembly strength in March 2007 elections, Paisley insisted he wouldn’t start talking face-to-face with Sinn Fein, never mind form a Cabinet with them.

    Yet within a few weeks, Paisley appeared alongside Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams live on TV to declare that their two parties had buried the hatchet.

    “We must not allow our justified loathing of the horrors and tragedies of the past to become a barrier to creating a better and more stable future,” Paisley said in that address, the first time he ever shared a platform with Sinn Fein.

    In the coming year, Paisley forced commentators to re-acess his legacy. Had he mellowed, or had he simply demanded the impossible and held his ground until his enemies delivered it?

    To the surprise of many, Paisley embraced his new role as Northern Ireland’s first minister with a relaxed demeanor, most strikingly when working alongside his government co-leader, former IRA commander Martin McGuinness. The two men said they formed a genuine, mutually respectful relationship. Joking together at events, they were dubbed “The Chuckle Brothers” by a disbelieving local press.

    Yet at Paisley’s insistence, they never shook hands. McGuinness said he understood and didn’t push the issue.

    Paisley stepped down as leader of the government and the Democratic Unionists in 2008. The coalition between his party and Sinn Fein continued to govern Northern Ireland with harmony, but far less humor.

    He retired from the House of Commons in 2010 and from Northern Ireland’s Assembly in 2011. The British government elevated him to the upper House of Lords, giving him the title Lord Bannside, a reference to the river that divides Northern Ireland.

    On Dec. 18, 2011, Paisley preached his last sermon at his flagship Free Presbyterian church, the Martyrs Memorial in Belfast, and reflected on the inevitability of death.

    “Thank God I’m nearer home today than I’ve ever been,” he told the standing-room-only crowd of 3,000. “Home sweet home where Jesus is, where the great apostles are, where the mighty angels are, where all our blood-washed friends are.”

    “We leap not into darkness, we Christians, and the shadow of death,” Paisley added. “We leap, rather, into the light and the burning sunshine of the light that will never go out.”

    He is survived by his wife, three daughters, two sons and many grandchildren.

  7. #2532
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    There's your third actor....

    EastEnders actor John Bardon has died aged 75
    The late actor starred in the BBC soap from 1996 to 2011
    EMMA POWELL
    Published: 12 September 2014 Updated: 13:15, 12 September 2014



    John Bardon who was famed for playing Dot Cotton’s husband Jim Branning in EastEnders has died aged 75.

    A blog post was released by the show’s press team to announce the actor’s passing, who it is believed had been suffering from a period of ill health.

    It read: "It is with great sadness that we report the death of much-loved actor John Bardon, who played Dot's husband, Jim Branning, from 1996 to 2011. He was 75."

    "Everyone at EastEnders is absolutely heartbroken to learn that John has sadly passed away. His bravery, dignity and courage in battling against the devastating effects of his stroke were admired by all who had the privilege of working with him.

    "Loved by us all, John was an exceptionally talented actor whose humour, mischievousness and brilliant performances made Jim Branning one of Walford's most loveable, memorable characters and we will miss John forever.

    "Our love and deepest sympathies are extended to Enda, his truly wonderful wife, at this very sad time. May he now rest in peace. Tonight's episode of EastEnders is dedicated to John, who will be sorely missed by all those who knew and worked with him."

    Stars of the show have been paying tribute after hearing the sad news.

    June Brown, who played the part of his onscreen wife Dot, said: "I am so sorry that John has passed away but hope that he is now at peace after seven difficult years.

    "I shall miss him very much as I loved him dearly. My thoughts are with his devoted wife, Enda."

    Bardon starred in the long running soap from 1996 to 2011, marrying his beloved Dot Cotton in 2002.

    After suffering from a stroke in 2007, his character was written out of the soap, but he managed to return to Albert Square on a number of occasions after it was written into the storylines that Jim himself had had a bad turn and needed to be cared for in a nursing home.

  8. #2533
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88




    BY ASSOCIATED PRESS SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 8:26 AM


    DUBLIN — The Rev. Ian Paisley, the divisive Protestant firebrand who devoted his life to thwarting compromise with Catholics in Northern Ireland only to become a pivotal peacemaker in his twilight years, died Friday in Belfast, his wife said. He was 88.

    Paisley was Northern Ireland’s most polarizing politician throughout its three decades of civil strife, during which the evangelist’s blistering oratory was often blamed for fueling the bloodshed that claimed 3,700 lives.

    Yet at the zenith of his peace-wrecking powers, Paisley in 2007 stunned the world by delivering the province’s first stable unity government between its British Protestants and its Irish Catholics. “Dr. No,” as he was widely known, finally said yes – and his powerful U-turn cemented a peace process that he had done so much to frustrate.

    From the conflict in Northern Ireland’s earliest days, Paisley prophesied damnation for any Protestant politician or church leader who dared to build bridges with the Catholic Church and Irish nationalists. Mainstream Protestant leaders in turn sought to dismiss Paisley as a bigoted crank.

    Hostile to the establishment, Paisley built his own extremist power base. His evangelical sect, the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster, labeled the pope as the antichrist and called the major Protestant denominations ecumenical Judases. His Democratic Unionist Party insisted that Northern Ireland’s union with Britain could not tolerate concessions to Irish nationalist demands.

    Often backed by the brooding menace of Protestant mobs and masked men, Paisley led club-wielding blockades of 1960s Catholic civil rights marches, demanded the military destruction of a resurgent Irish Republican Army, and denounced the U.S.-brokered Good Friday peace accord of 1998 as a surrender to “the men of blood” in the IRA’s Sinn Fein party.

    Protestants rallied behind him with such fervor that no political initiative could last without his support. Over and over, he claimed the political scalps of compromise-minded Protestant leaders from the rival Ulster Unionist Party.

    In 1973, Ulster Unionist leaders cut a peace deal with moderate Catholics and the Irish government that foreshadowed the ultimate success of the Good Friday peace accord a quarter-century later. But Paisley worked with Ulster Unionist hard-liners and Protestant paramilitary groups to bring Northern Ireland to a standstill. Roads were blocked, electricity was cut off, and the fledgling Protestant-Catholic administration collapsed in May 1974.

    Paisley perennially reaffirmed his status as Northern Ireland’s most popular politician, topping more than a dozen votes in elections to the British and European parliaments, where he held seats simultaneously in London and Brussels for a quarter-century.

    Friend and foe alike called him “the big man” in recognition of his broad-shouldered, 6-foot-3 (1.9-meter-tall) frame, oversized facial features and superhuman lungs that, even late in life, allowed him to outshout opponents.

    To many Catholics, he was the figure they most loved to hate. This reflected, partly, their recognition of his unflagging energy. They also understood that Paisley’s most notorious outbursts – his violent language, his 1988 heckling of Pope John Paul II – encouraged outsiders to sympathize with the Catholic side of the conflict.

    Indeed, Protestant rivals frequently described Paisley as the IRA’s best recruiting sergeant. The IRA seemed to agree. The underground organization killed or maimed dozens of Protestant politicians, but never made an attempt to assassinate him.

    Paisley always enjoyed a stronger personal following than his Democratic Unionists could muster as a party. Throughout the years of bloodshed, Paisley’s party served as a thorn in the side to the Ulster Unionists, the party that forged Northern Ireland as a Protestant-majority state in the 1920s as the Catholic rest of Ireland won independence from Britain.

    An IRA cease-fire in 1997 opened the door for the Catholic-based Sinn Fein party to enter talks on Northern Ireland’s future in negotiations overseen by former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell. While the Ulster Unionists stayed at the table, Paisley’s DUP bolted for the exit.

    Mitchell considered Paisley’s voluntarily exile an essential ingredient for reaching the Good Friday peace accord of April 10, 1998. Had the Democratic Unionists “stayed and fought from within, there would have been no agreement,” Mitchell wrote in his memoir.

    But even as the British, Irish and U.S. governments sought to marginalize Paisley, excluding him from subsequent talks, his appeal surged amid the chronic political crises that followed the accord.

    The pact called for Sinn Fein to receive seats in a coalition government, and for the IRA to disarm fully by mid-2000 but didn’t explicitly link those mutually reinforcing goals.

    When the IRA insisted it wouldn’t surrender even a single bullet and raised doubts about its cease-fire commitments, Paisley crowed he’d been vindicated and the Ulster Unionist-led government suffered irreparable damage.

    Months later, in 2003, Paisley’s party won most seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly. Protestants had given Paisley an absolute veto over any resumption of cooperation with Sinn Fein, an apparent Doomsday scenario for power-sharing.

    Paisley declared there wasn’t “a snowball’s chance in Hell” he’d work with Sinn Fein unless the IRA surrendered all weapons and disbanded publicly. Upping the ante, he called on Sinn Fein leaders to don “sackcloth and ashes,” an Old Testament ritual for demonstrating repentance and shame.

    Paisley seemed determined to humiliate his enemies – yet this time his unbending reputation suited the cause of lasting peace.

    The IRA in 2005 disarmed and renounced violence, transforming its truce from open-ended to permanent. Sinn Fein in January 2007 voted to support the police, accepting the legitimacy of the Northern Ireland state for the first time.

    Even then, Paisley demanded more. He called on Sinn Fein leaders to confess to police all the unsolved IRA crimes they and their colleagues had committed.

    When the Democratic Unionists increased their Assembly strength in March 2007 elections, Paisley insisted he wouldn’t start talking face-to-face with Sinn Fein, never mind form a Cabinet with them.

    Yet within a few weeks, Paisley appeared alongside Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams live on TV to declare that their two parties had buried the hatchet.

    “We must not allow our justified loathing of the horrors and tragedies of the past to become a barrier to creating a better and more stable future,” Paisley said in that address, the first time he ever shared a platform with Sinn Fein.

    In the coming year, Paisley forced commentators to re-acess his legacy. Had he mellowed, or had he simply demanded the impossible and held his ground until his enemies delivered it?

    To the surprise of many, Paisley embraced his new role as Northern Ireland’s first minister with a relaxed demeanor, most strikingly when working alongside his government co-leader, former IRA commander Martin McGuinness. The two men said they formed a genuine, mutually respectful relationship. Joking together at events, they were dubbed “The Chuckle Brothers” by a disbelieving local press.

    Yet at Paisley’s insistence, they never shook hands. McGuinness said he understood and didn’t push the issue.

    Paisley stepped down as leader of the government and the Democratic Unionists in 2008. The coalition between his party and Sinn Fein continued to govern Northern Ireland with harmony, but far less humor.

    He retired from the House of Commons in 2010 and from Northern Ireland’s Assembly in 2011. The British government elevated him to the upper House of Lords, giving him the title Lord Bannside, a reference to the river that divides Northern Ireland.

    On Dec. 18, 2011, Paisley preached his last sermon at his flagship Free Presbyterian church, the Martyrs Memorial in Belfast, and reflected on the inevitability of death.

    “Thank God I’m nearer home today than I’ve ever been,” he told the standing-room-only crowd of 3,000. “Home sweet home where Jesus is, where the great apostles are, where the mighty angels are, where all our blood-washed friends are.”

    “We leap not into darkness, we Christians, and the shadow of death,” Paisley added. “We leap, rather, into the light and the burning sunshine of the light that will never go out.”

    He is survived by his wife, three daughters, two sons and many grandchildren.

    A bad minded bigot if ever there was one. His hatred and badness cost a lot of people their lives. He didn't Live In Peace, so, he shouldn't Rest In Peace.

  9. #2534
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I prefer to think of him as a true British hero who kept the kiddie fiddlers at bay.

  10. #2535
    The Pikey Hunter
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    A complete and utter [at][at][at][at] who was hated on both sides of the divide. Burn in hell you bastard.

  11. #2536
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    Stefan Gierasch, Actor in 'Jeremiah Johnson' and 'Carrie,' Dies at 88
    10:46 AM PST 09/12/2014 by Mike Barnes



    He also appeared in 'High Plains Drifter,' 'The Hustler,' 'Silver Streak' and 'Dave'

    Stefan Gierasch, a character actor for nearly six decades who stood out opposite Robert Redford in Sydney Pollack’s poetic 1972 Western Jeremiah Johnson, has died. He was 88.

    Gierasch died Sept. 6 at his home in Santa Monica of complications from a stroke, his wife, Hedy Sontag, told The Hollywood Reporter.

    Gierasch also played the mayor of Lago who Clint Eastwood ousts in favor of a dwarf in High Plains Drifter (1973). And as the dense Principal Morton, Gierasch fell victim to an electric shock at the high school prom in Brian De Palma’s horror classic Carrie (1976).

    In Jeremiah Johnson, Gierasch stole his share of scenes as the colorful trapper Del Gue, who’s buried up to his neck in sand and has feathers stuffed up his nose when he first encounters Redford’s title character.

    “These here is God’s finest sculpturing!” Del Gue, talking about the Rocky Mountains, says later in the film. “And there ain’t no laws for the brave ones! And there ain’t no asylums for the crazy ones! And there ain’t no churches except for this right here! And there ain’t no priests excepting the birds! By God, I are a mountain man, and I’ll live until an arrow or a bullet finds me!”

    A native of New York who studied at the Actors Studio, Gierasch also appeared in such films as The Hustler (1961), What's Up Doc? (1972), The New Centurions (1972), Cornbread, Earl and Me (1975), Silver Streak (1976), Perfect (1985), Dave (1993), Junior (1994) and Murder in the First (1995).

    His body of work on television included stints on The Defenders, Naked City, The Untouchables, Nichols, Mod Squad, Kung Fu, Starsky and Hutch, Kung Fu, Barney Miller, Dallas, Fantasy Island, M*A*S*H, The Jeffersons, Miami Vice, Star Trek: The Next Generation and ER.

    Gierasch made his Broadway debut in 1944 in Snafu, produced and directed by George Abbott, and was in the original 1959 production of The Sound of Music. He also appeared in revivals of Threepenny Opera, The Iceman Cometh, Of Mice and Men and You Never Can Tell.

    In addition to Heddy, his wife of 33 years and an actress and faculty member at the Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute, survivors include his children Amanda, Elisa and Matthew and cousin Flor.

  12. #2537
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    Nicole Kidman's father Dr Antony Kidman dies after tragic accident in Singapore

    Nicole Kidman’s father has been killed following tragic accident in Singapore, it has been reported.

    According to Australian broadcaster Network 10, Dr Antony Kidman died after suffering a fall when visiting Antonia Kidman, Nicole’s sister, in the country.

    The late Dr Kidman was a clinical psychologist at Royal North Shore Hospital, as well as a director of health psychology at the University of Technology Sydney.

    Neither a spokesperson for the Kidmans nor the Royal North Shore Hospital have commented on the news as of yet.

    The Daily Mail Australia reports that a woman at the Kidmans’ home declined to offer any further information because she didn’t feel “comfortable” speaking to the press as of yet.

    Alongside his work as a psychologist, for which he was awarded the Order of Australia in 2005, Dr Kidman conducted research into the psycho-social implications posed by sufferers of breast cancer and other diseases. He was a regular talking head on psychological health-related issues, and frequently appeared on Australian television, radio and wrote for academic journals.

    The family were last pictured together in Sydney in January 2014, as he and his wife Janelle celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

    He accompanied Nicole Kidman on the red carpet of the Swisse Celebrate Life Ball in Melbourne in June.

    Nicole Kidman, who was born in Hawaii in 1967 before the family moved to Sydney, Australia when she was four, previously spoke of her father a “great” man that was always there for her when she needed him.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/pe...e-9728680.html

  13. #2538
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    Bob Crewe, Singer and Four Seasons Songwriter, Dead at 83

    Writer of "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," "Lady Marmalade," "Big Girls Don't Cry" and "Walk Like a Man" had six-decade career



    Bob Crewe, the veteran singer, songwriter and producer who penned a string of hits for the Four Seasons, including "Sherry," "Big Girls Don't Cry," "Walk Like a Man" and "Rag Doll," died Thursday at the age of 83. Crewe's brother, Dan, confirmed the songwriter's death to Rolling Stone. Crewe made an indelible impact on pop music, co-writing the ubiquitous "Can't Take My Eyes Off You" in 1967 for Frankie Valli and Labelle's 1974 hit "Lady Marmalade" alongside tracks for Michael Jackson, Roberta Flack and Peabo Bryson.

    Crewe began his career in the 1950s as a singer and producer, writing for doo-wop/pop group the Rays. The group scored their biggest hit with 1957's "Silhouettes," which would later be covered by Herman's Hermits and Bob Dylan, the latter recording the track for his legendary Basement Tapes sessions.

    Crewe would spend most of the Fifties writing hits for other singers before recording two albums himself in 1961 and becoming a "teen heartthrob" alongside Ricky Nelson and Paul Anka. After meeting songwriter Bob Gaudio, the duo would go on to write and produce some of the biggest hits of the decade, starting with "Sherry." Recorded in 1962 by the Four Seasons, the song became a Number One hit. Crewe produced the 1963 hit "Candy Girl" and wrote and produced the 1965 Four Seasons track "Let's Hang On!," both of which remain pop standards.

    In 1965, Crewe formed DynoVoice Records, releasing the psychedelic lounge-pop track "Music to Watch Girls By" (famously covered by Leonard Nimoy in 1967 as "Music to Watch Space Girls By") alongside albums by Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels and R&B trio the Toys and the soundtrack to the 1968 sci-fi cult film Barbarella. The Toys would score a hit in 1965 with "A Lover's Concerto," which would go on to sell more than two million copies, while Mitch Ryder's Crewe-produced cover of Shorty Long's "Devil With a Blue Dress On" in 1966 became a Top 5 hit for the band and classic rock staple.

    In 1967, Crewe wrote and produced "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," which would become one of his biggest hits and a perennial cultural touchstone, appearing in countless film and television appearances. Originally recorded by Frankie Valli, the song has been covered by everyone from Diana Ross and Julio Iglesias to Pet Shop Boys, Lauryn Hill and Muse.

    Crewe continued to work in various genres in the Seventies, recording and writing both pop and disco hits and forming cult disco group Disco-Tex and the Sex-O-Lettes. In 1974, Crewe penned the Allen Toussaint-produced "Lady Marmalade" for Labelle. While frontwoman Patti Labelle was unaware that the titular character was a prostitute, the song became a Number One hit and Crewe's "Voulez-vous coucher avec moi, ce soir?" another cultural touchstone.

    In 2011, Rolling Stone included "Lady Marmalade" on the list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, noting that "the group was from Philadelphia, but the nasty groove was classic New Orleans, with producer Toussaint and his house band, legendary R&B stalwarts the Meters, funking up the beat." The song would end up being covered by numerous vocalists and groups, most notably Christina Aguilera, Lil' Kim, Mýa, and Pink in 2001 for Baz Luhrmann's 2001 film Moulin Rouge!

    Crewe was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1995 and would later become a fine artist, designing album covers and showcasing exhibitions of his paintings. In 2004, Jersey Boys, the jukebox musical based upon the songs and career of the Four Seasons, premiered, with Crewe getting credited as the show's lyricist. It moved to Broadway in 2005 and won four Tonys, including Best Musical, the following year. A Best Musical Show Album Grammy would follow in 2007.

    According to the Miami Herald, Crewe's brother Dan had transferred the musician to a nursing home after he was diagnosed with dementia. "He was responsible for that signature Four Seasons sound," Jonathan Hadley, who portrayed Crewe in Jersey Boys, told the Herald in 2012. "He’s an unsung hero."



    Bob Crewe, Singer and Four Seasons Songwriter, Dead at 83 | Rolling Stone

  14. #2539
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    ^RIP. Songs of my youth.....

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    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88
    I wonder if they'll observe a moment of shouting in his memory.

  16. #2541
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    Quote Originally Posted by quimbian corholla View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88
    I wonder if they'll observe a moment of shouting in his memory.
    There will be some pissed impressions going off across the six counties tonight that's for sure.

  17. #2542
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88
    A great shame ! It's a pity the evil bastard didn't die about forty years ago.

  18. #2543
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    He must of made an impression on you lot...

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    Denny Miller, Star of 'Tarzan' and 'Wagon Train,' Dies at 80
    3:22 PM PST 09/12/2014 by Mike Barnes



    He played basketball at UCLA under John Wooden and appeared with Peter Sellers in 'The Party' and in commercials for fish sticks

    Denny Miller, who played scout Duke Shannon on the classic TV Western Wagon Train and was the first blond Tarzan on the big screen, has died. He was 80.

    Miller, who wore a yellow rain slicker as the Gorton’s Fisherman in TV commercials for the seafood company for more than a decade, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease in January and died Tuesday in Las Vegas, his agent, David Moss, told The Hollywood Reporter.

    The strapping 6-foot-4 Miller, who played basketball at UCLA for legendary coach John Wooden in the 1950s, also is known for his role as Western movie actor “Wyoming” Bill Kelso in the delightful 1968 Peter Sellers comedy The Party, directed by Blake Edwards.

    Miller appeared in two episodes of CBS’ Gilligan’s Island: one as surfer Duke Williams, who washed ashore after a tsunami, and another as Tongo, an ape man who is captured and put in a cage.

    Miller appeared over three seasons in more than 100 episodes of Wagon Train, which aired on NBC and ABC from 1957 to 1965. He then segued to playing an Air Force sergeant who is married to a Las Vegas chorus girl (Juliet Prowse) in the short-lived NBC sitcom Mona McCluskey.

    Miller starred as Edgar Rice Burroughs’ lord of the jungle in the low-budget Tarzan, the Ape Man (1959), a remake of the 1932 classic that starred Olympic gold medalist Johnny Weissmuller. Footage from that film, as well as Tarzan’s yell, were recycled from the original (both were made at MGM).

    A native of Bloomington, Ind., Miller was thinking about pursuing a career as a basketball or football coach when he was spotted by an agent on Sunset Boulevard. He signed a movie contract at MGM after his screen test was directed by George Cukor and appeared in an uncredited role in the Frank Sinatra drama Some Came Running (1958).

    Miller also worked in such films as Making It (1971), written by Peter Bart, Buck and the Preacher (1972) and The Norseman (1978).

    The actor made more of a mark on television, with stints on dozens of shows including Have Gun — Will Travel, The Rifleman, Ben Casey, The Fugitive, I Spy, The High Chaparral, Hawaii Five-O, I Dream of Jeannie, The Brady Bunch, The Six Million Dollar Man, Battlestar Galactica, Barnaby Jones, Charlie’s Angels, Dallas, Magnum, P.I. and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.

    Survivors include his wife, Nancy.

  20. #2545
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Survivors include his wife, Nancy.

    .... and me.

  21. #2546
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    Quote Originally Posted by can123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Survivors include his wife, Nancy.

    .... and me.
    Really? And how were you related to him, iceman?

  22. #2547
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    Not a superstar, but certainly more famous than Nicole Kidman's dad....



    Pianist and composer Joe Sample, a founding member of the genre-crossing Jazz Crusaders who helped pioneer the electronic jazz-funk fusion style, has died at age 75.

    Sample died of complications due to lung cancer on Friday evening at the MD Anderson Cancer Centre in Houston, his manager Patrick Rains said. Sample's family was at his bedside.

    Sample was "a seminal figure in the transition from acoustic to electronic music in the jazz field in the late '60s and early '70s" with his band, Mr Rains said.

    The group, which later called itself The Crusaders, became a successful crossover act with such hits as the 1979 single and album Street Life. A few years before that, they became the first instrumental band to tour with the Rolling Stones.

    Samples' songs were also sampled by hip-hop artists, including Tupac Shakur, who used In All My Wildest Dreams on his Dear Mama.

    He was a session player, too, working with artists including Marvin Gaye, BB King, Joni Mitchell, Steely Dan and Quincy Jones, according to a 2011 profile in the Houston Chronicle.

    A native of Houston's Fifth Ward, he told the newspaper for a story two years later that music and the jazz tradition were different in Texas than anywhere else.

    "Blues is like the white dust in the neighbourhood from the oyster-shell streets," he told the Chronicle. "It's a natural thing in this region.

    "Certain things I can play with musicians from here that I cannot play with other musicians from Chicago or Seattle or Boston or New York. They simply do not feel it."
    Joe Sample, jazz pioneer pianist with Crusaders, dies at 75 | Herald Scotland

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    Quote Originally Posted by can123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    Ian Paisley, Protestant firebrand-turned-peacemaker in Northern Ireland, dies aged 88
    A great shame ! It's a pity the evil bastard didn't die about forty years ago.
    Great to hear that the bigoted old dinosaur finally found his well-appointed tar-pit though.

  • #2549
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    Paisley’s brand of Christianity helped both the IRA and Loyalists detonate the bombs that murdered and maimed thousands throughout Northern Ireland.

    Now politically rehabilitated, Ian Paisley was once a perfect example of how raw incitement can be ripened into outright murder in the name of sadistic religion.

    In June 1959, at a rally in Belfast, the darling Ian ranted; “You people of the Shankill Road, what’s wrong with you? Number 425 Shankill Road – do you know who lives there? Pope’s men, that’s who! Forte’s ice cream shop, Italian Papists on the Shankill Road! How about 56 Aden Street? For 97 years a Protestant lived in that house and now there’s a Papist in it. Crimea Street, number 38! Twenty five years that house has been up, 24 years a Protestant lived there but there’s a Papist there now.”

    This is not mere rabble rousing – this is giving an inflamed mob the actual addresses of innocent people whom Paisley has decreed to be enemies by virtue of their Catholic place of worship or their Italian nationality. Without the unalloyed incitements of Paisley and his all-too-lengthy list of like-minded predecessors, I would wager that most people might just have gotten on with their lives and, in time, learned to simply get along with their neighbours. This is not a naive supposition.

    Of course, Ian Paisley, much like people who listen to the crap droning pronouncements of Gerry Adams has never quite evolved. Here he is mangling some metaphors in the service of further incitement:

    “They (Catholics) breed like rabbits and multiply like vermin”

    Mixing rodent and rabbit metaphors aside – this is a classic demonisation used very effectively against the Jews in the Nazi propaganda film “The Eternal Jew” in which Jews are depicted as sewer rats multiplying in their millions and overrunning Germany.
    Having demonstrated the democratic inclusivity of his hatreds by adding local Italians to his list, Paisley then went on to the perennial favourite of all such morons when he declared that ....“[Harold Smith] is a Jew. As a Jew, he rejects our Lord Jesus Christ, the New Testament, Protestant principles, the Glorious Reformation and the sanctity of the Lord’s Day. The Protestant throne and the Protestant constitution are nothing to him.”

    Big Ian also had a problem with dancing.
    “Line dancing is as sinful as any other type of dancing, with its sexual gestures and touching. It is an incitement to lust.”
    He had no problem whatsoever with fomenting riots, hatred and murder – but put on a pair of cowboy boots – turn up the volume on that good ‘ole country music, and Mr Paisley is foaming at the mouth condemning dancers to hell. No doubt his own personal hell would see him spend all eternity line dancing, hand in hand with a Jew, a Catholic and Willy Nelson.
    If Paisley is an easy target, often dismissed as a bible-thumping fundamentalist, the fact remains that for most of his life he was a malignant fucking buffoon whose words caused innocent people to die; and the fact also remains that his odious, incendiary pronouncements are solely a result of his religious beliefs. His putrid sentiments did not form within him out of any logical thought processes – they came about because he believes in a supposed God.......they are based exclusively on the idea that the divinity he worships is superior to the divinity worshiped by others. He is powered by religious belief in exactly the same way that ignorant fanaticism powers suicide bombers and terrorists.

    You might sense some kind of Irish Nationalist bias in my choice of Paisley as an example of fervent idiocy, but you’d be wrong – you see, I would write about the ideology of Gerry Adams, and Mc Guinness, but I find it difficult to type and vomit at the same time.

  • #2550
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    “Line dancing is as sinful as any other type of dancing, with its sexual gestures and touching. It is an incitement to lust.”
    So that's where the Mullahs got their ideas from.

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