Thread: Daily Moan

  1. #3251
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    Not until you know God was the response.
    possible solution: tell the orphanage you (as opposed to the wife) know God, quote a few common bibical passages with palms piously pressed in prayer and rescue the girl for family-type weekends...as for the gay boy, better he gets used to such treatment early on in life...the prospect of becoming a light-fingered Pattaya ladyboy may be all that's open to him...
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  2. #3252
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    Until such time as you can find the father's address, you might quietly donate a few thousand monthly to the grandparents for the child's upkeep...good karma...
    The good karma' is that I'm personally getting involved. Unlike some on this forum who would look on it as 'not my problem' and walk on by.
    I've got three kids of my own to finance without volunteering to finance some other child and his grandparents. Just a matter of time before I get a lead on how to contact the boy's father, hopefully.

  3. #3253
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    The good karma' is that I'm personally getting involved.
    agree...
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    Unlike some on this forum who would look on it as 'not my problem' and walk on by
    a tad judgmental: focus on your own good karma...
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    I've got three kids of my own to finance
    living up to your responsibilities, then...

  4. #3254
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    The boy's father never even came back to the village for his wife's funeral. Doesn't like it here
    Fluke's got a brother?

    Sorry, carry on. Good man, Prag.

  5. #3255
    Valve Master
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    Pragmatic, If you ruminate on the whole thing for a while, you will eventually come up with a chain of events which has his address at the end.

    "Gently gently catchee monkey". Go about the whole thing in a very roundabout fashion, and success will be yours. You may have to bribe someone to be your agent, or actor, but you will find his name and address evntually. Good luck.

  6. #3256
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    Just a matter of time before I get a lead on how to contact the boy's father, hopefully.
    Let us know how you go, and kudos to you. Yeah, you don't have to get financially involved.
    I wonder if a few pies would help make the kid's days happier?

  7. #3257
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    I wonder if a few pies would help make the kid's days happier?
    The boy seems to be doing well regarding his weight. From his appearance his grandparents seem to be doing a good job even though they're piss poor.

  8. #3258
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    Unfortunately, my moan is that I can't get the fathers UK address etc to let him know what's happening.
    I'm assuming you have his name. But might be a common name.

  9. #3259
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    I can't sit aside and see it happen
    Until such time as you can find the father's address, you might quietly donate a few thousand monthly to the grandparents for the child's upkeep...good karma...
    EDIT:- Heaps of posts sinced I started to pen my post and it seems I'm the odd one out.

    Just my experience of living closely with Thai's.

    ---

    I wouldn't be giving any money.

    Better to not interfere with Thai affairs, particularly when you don't know all the story first hand.

    The generous hand-up may, down the track evolve into something more nefarious.

    We have a kid same as him within the Family circle. His name is Umm.

    He is my Partners, Mother's, Sister's, Daughters Son

    Sees his mother maybe once every month or two, left to Grandma to take care of.

    Sometimes Grandma can't take care of him (she works) so he comes to our/the Thai Farmhouse.
    When he's sick and can't go to school he's just left in his house (built next door) to the Thai Farmhouse where we all live and
    eventually comes over, hooks into our internet and plays computer games ALL day.
    We feed him, he never comes with food.
    And ... before all the do-gooders jump down our throats ... it's life in Thailand.

    I live with 4 generations of them ... most of them under the same roof as us.
    It's their, my Partners Parents Farm House.


    Yes, we do buy him somethings, sometimes.

    When the Family does things which I've organised, sometimes we invite him along.
    Back to giving money ... it's a firm no from our experience.

    Oh, as an aside, the Thai Parents in the house have and continue to raise their grandchildren.

    Yes, it sucks ... but it's life in Thailand.

    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

    .

  10. #3260
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD
    it seems I'm the odd one out
    not necessarily...you provide back-up space for the boy, some free internet and occasional family activities...that's more than he would have had in your absence...

  11. #3261
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    I wonder if a few pies would help make the kid's days happier?
    The boy seems to be doing well regarding his weight. From his appearance his grandparents seem to be doing a good job even though they're piss poor.
    Sorry, it was a vague reference to a famous pie magnet (sic) who gives hundreds of pies to orphans.

  12. #3262
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    I'm assuming you have his name. But might be a common name.
    Steven or Stephen Palmer. Lives in London. Not much help there really. But hopefully the family must have his phone number and the missus will try and get it.

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD
    Better to not interfere with Thai affairs,
    Never been a problem in the 12 years I've been here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    Sorry, it was a vague reference to a famous pie magnet (sic) who gives hundreds of pies to orphans.
    That's okay. My vague reference to the boys weight was cuz he's slightly on the plump size. And it looks like grand-folk have been feeding him too many snacks.

  13. #3263
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...on a related topic: the annual British moan...

    How Americanisms are Killing the English Language
    By Hephzibah Anderson

    So it turns out I can no longer speak English. This was the alarming realisation foisted upon me by Matthew Engel’s witty, cantankerous yet nonetheless persuasive polemic That’s the Way it Crumbles: The American Conquest of English. Because by English, I mean British English.

    Despite having been born, raised and educated on British shores, it seems my mother tongue has been irreparably corrupted by the linguistic equivalent of the grey squirrel. And I’m not alone. Whether you’re a lover or a loather of phrases like “Can I get a decaf soy latte to go?”, chances are your vocabulary has been similarly colonised.

    The infiltration of US coffee chains has made ubiquitous phrases such as ‘Can I get a decaf soy latte to go?’

    Speaking on the wireless in 1935, Alistair Cooke declared that “Every Englishman listening to me now unconsciously uses 30 or 40 Americanisms a day”. In 2017, that number is likely closer to three or four hundred, Engel hazards – more for a teenager, “if they use that many words in a day”.

    As a nation we’ve been both invaded and invader, and our language is all the richer for it.

    But how did this happen and why should we care? After all, as a nation we’ve been both invaded and invader, and our language is all the richer for it. Words like bungalow, bazaar, even Blighty, have their roots elsewhere. Heck, go far enough back and isn’t it pretty much all just distorted Latin, French or German?

    The first American words to make it across the pond were largely utilitarian – signifiers for flora and fauna that didn’t exist back in Merrie England. Moose, maize and tobacco were among them. But there were others, too, that in retrospect might seem laden with significance – words like plentifulness, monstrosity and conflagration.

    ATM is a boring but brief alternative to the British cash point, cash machine and hole in the wall.

    With no means of swift communication or easeful passage between the two countries, American English merely trickled back into its source to begin with. But as the balance of power between Britain and her former colonies shifted, as America ascended to military, economic, cultural and technological dominance, that trickle swelled to a torrent, washing away any kind of quality control.

    Throughout the 19th Century, Engel contends, “the Americanisms that permeated the British language did so largely on merit, because they were more expressive, more euphonious, sharper and cleverer than their British counterparts”. What word-lover could resist the likes of ‘ornery’, ‘boondoggle’ or ‘scuttlebutt’? That long ago ceased to be the case, leaving us with words and phrases that reek of euphemism – ‘passing’ instead of dying – or that mock their user with meaninglessness, like the non-existent Rose Garden that political reporters decided No 10 had to have, just because the White House has one (it doesn’t exactly have one either, not in the strictest sense, but that’s a whole other story).

    What word-lover could resist the likes of ‘ornery’, ‘boondoggle’ or ‘scuttlebutt’?

    Call me a snob, but there’s also the fact that some American neologisms are just plain ungainly. I recently picked up a promising new American thriller to find ‘elevator’ used as a verb in the opening chapter. As in, Ahmed was ‘elevatoring’ towards the top of his profession in Manhattan.

    Nowadays, no sphere of expression remains untouched. Students talk of campus and semesters. Magistrates, brainwashed by endless CSI reruns, ask barristers “Will counsel please approach the bench?” We uncheck boxes in a vain effort to avoid being inundated with junk mail that, when it arrives regardless, we move to trash.

    ...the rest of the rather windy moan is here: BBC - Culture - How Americanisms are killing the English language

  14. #3264
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    ^
    It pisses me off also about American English. They teach it in the schools here in Thailand and it's kind of difficult when helping ones kids with their homework.

    I decided to ask why they teach American English at the Catholic school where my children go to. The simple answer was that the school buy's their English learning package from Bangkok after it is imported from the Philippines.

    There seems to be no concern as to which is correct, American or English English. As long as it's cheap and fools the people that they are speaking good English then 3rd will countries will go for American English.

  15. #3265
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    There seems to be no concern as to which is correct, American or English English
    ...it's a matter of usage, not correctness...YankSpeak uber alles...

  16. #3266
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    it's a matter of usage, not correctness...
    No it isn't. Every year the schools have inter district spelling competitions. Now depending how you spell a word, English or American, can cost you. So which is correct?

  17. #3267
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    English has been absorbing words from other languages for many hundreds of years. So nothing wrong with that. No worries there. (see I added an Aus. expression).

    It is not the words that grate it is things like this "Ahmed was ‘elevatoring’ towards the top of his profession in Manhattan" Taking words and being lazy.


    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    isn’t it pretty much all just distorted Latin, French or German?
    Actually more like a mixture of old English and Danish. As in words like "craft" being old English and "skill" being Dansk. But hey what do Americans know?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    the linguistic equivalent of the grey squirrel
    The grey (at least this was spelt correctly) squirrel is no longer in ascendance . The red squirrel and the black squirrel are making a comeback in certain parts.


    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    sharper and cleverer than their British counterparts”.
    Not in my limited experience. Brasher and louder maybe. Don't get me started on pronunciation as yes many words are taken from French so have vestiges of French pronunciation. Route is a thing one travels along. Rout is what the vikings did. Roof is on a house, not something a dog says.
    Better to think inside the pub, than outside the box?
    I apologize if any offence was caused. unless it was intended.
    You people, you think I know feck nothing; I tell you: I know feck all
    Those who cannot change their mind, cannot change anything.

  18. #3268
    Valve Master
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    It's all very well to use or read slang whilst knowing it is slang. We can deal with that, and it can be fun.

    But it's another completely to be quietly reading a leading newspaper here in Australia, feeling psychologically safe in the knowledge that they are not going to mangle the English language, only to run up against the "disconnect" between two things they are describing.

    This grates on my nerves and offends my linguistic sensibilities.

  19. #3269
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    I had this problem on my last visit to PI. Although I am a north Englander, I don't have a strong accent, unless i am pissed.
    I was informed by one flipper that she had no idea why I couldn't understand her 'English' as it was 'perfect'. This happened more than once.
    Having recently spent 3 months in the sandpit with flipper expats, I can say without fear or favour, that the first girl was wrong in believing her English was perfect. It was 'Tagalog English' at best.
    In the ME, the expat flips have better English or better adapted English skills. In Flipland they are deceiving themselves, which is probably why they can't get English speaking jobs abroad. (With apologies to Katie, the exception proving the rule).

    Philippinas still speak way better English than most Thais, even if it is adulterated American English.
    Heart of Gold and a Knob of butter.

  20. #3270
    Harbinger of Doom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    ...that the school buy's their English learning package...
    Probably best to get the basics mastered before worrying about whether it's assholes or arseholes who bollock on about British vs American English.

  21. #3271
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    ^ The dog's bollocks or a load of...

  22. #3272
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    There seems to be no concern as to which is correct, American or English English.
    good...
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic
    So which is correct?
    both
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Roof is on a house, not something a dog says.
    thanks for clarifying...
    Quote Originally Posted by Passing Through
    Probably best to get the basics mastered
    of course...spelling bee rules aside, of course...

  23. #3273
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    My own feeble Lily-livered personality- I need to grow a spine!
    For months now my pen pushing, bean counting head of department has becoming more and more temperamental and unreasonable- he's getting hitched and has become Groomzilla. I get that it can't be all fun paying for a wedding on a local salary- not my problem,tho!

    I got yelled at for a very simple inquiry about the development of assessment forms. He threw a toddler like tantrum and stormed off campus. There I'm sat looking rather bemused.

    Sent an email asking for a transfer or told them they can say bye to me in October. Now racked with guilt and blaming myself. I should write letters for Cosmo- I'm a pathetic excuse of masculinity and being assertive

  24. #3274
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VocalNeal
    Roof is on a house, not something a dog says.
    thanks for clarifying
    Toilet
    Washroom
    Restroom
    Dunny/Loo

    There ya go, four/five types of English!

  25. #3275
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    Here we go with the UK/US English once again.

    I read that article ^^^^(?) on BBC today. It's funny how the Brits are struggling with the reality. I've said my comments re: this in other threads. The Brits just can't be able to accept that the number of speakers/users of UK English will, in time, be proportionally less than the users of US English. This is because of various sources or reasons, like Hollywood - TV and movies, technology - FB, Twitter & other social media sites, even Microsoft and its default use of US English.

    @Prag - if you don't like the US English books that your kids' school use, then enroll them in another school. Perhaps a more pricey one where they use UK English books. Heh.

    The reason that they (the school) use books from PI is because they're cheaper, as they were reprinted in PI. Cheaper books, less money spent by the school. Boils down to logistics.

    As to my use of English, when I lived abroad it didn't matter to us which version of English we used, as long as we could all understand and communicate with each other. It was in continental Europe and for us foreigners (even the locals), English was a second language. I've never had problems being understood by a Brit, American or Aussie, or other Europeans who were NNES.

    Due to Hollywood, I'm more familiar with various North American accents than UK ones. I remember watching the movie Creed (Rocky spinoff) and I could hardly understand Creed's opponent, who was from Manchester (I think). I also had initial difficulty in understanding Harry Potter and friends. But after 7 movies, I am now familiar with Harry & Hermione's accent.

    There was also this BBC article about native English speakers being at a disadvantage when working in an international environment, because NES use colloquialisms while NNES take things more literally. Hence the rise of "Globish".

    Heck, I didn't know the terms Poms, soap dodgers, Seppos, mooning, cottaging, etc. I only knew them here on TD!

    If anyone wants to hear me speak, he/she can call me on Skype. I don't use Line - it's not popular in PI. Heh.

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