Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 204
  1. #51
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Mousehole
    Posts
    20,904
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    now your gonna turn your STD into a meal...
    You never heard of cunnilingus before

  2. #52
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Mousehole
    Posts
    20,904
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    Well it looks as if this experiment has failed miserably! The crust is a deep golden brown the loaf? Flat.
    That's exactly what happened when I tried to copy Strolls german bed.
    The crust was nice but the inside was still fudgy.

    Keep posting. I want to know the remedy.

  3. #53
    Sauerkraut stroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Oktoberfest
    Posts
    21,376
    My baby has gone very active since I added more flour and water last night.
    I'll prepare the baking mix for tomorrow later.
    At which stage should I add the salt?

    Nan sourdough - cool!

  4. #54
    Sauerkraut stroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Oktoberfest
    Posts
    21,376
    Quote Originally Posted by Thetyim
    Keep posting. I want to know the remedy.
    Been thinking about this.
    An important difference is, that I used a rice-cooker, not an oven, so some of the 'rising' occured at the early stages of the pot heating with the loaf already inside. Just a thought.

    I'll think of something else for the sourdough, to get a proper crust.
    "this message is hidden because the turdsniffing oaf is on your ignore list"

  5. #55
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    the salt should be added when you begin to make the dough. I forgot it completely until I was on the table kneading it sprinkling it in with the added flour was waaay too late. The slt wasn't the big mistake I just didn;t wait for the dough to completely rise. I think the oven should probably been 25 - 50 degrees F lower too
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


  6. #56
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    Quote Originally Posted by El Gibbon
    After punching down your loaf, I always let it raise to at least double the amount, in volume. ( Actually a lot of bread recipes tell you that on both raise cycles you should at least let the volume double) This may take some time depending on the activity of your yeast. To promote some activity you might add a pinch of sugar to the original dough mixture. A pinch won't affect the flavor of the final product.
    Alot of sourdough recipes say NOT to go for a second rise. the wild yeasts and acidity from the bacteria are not conducive to rapid rising. I knew the "Double volume" rule I ignored it because of lack of patience. I was aware of the fact sourdoughs take much longer aware of teh double rule and I ignored them my fault for being impatient. really quite simple Glutenous flour is more difficult to digest adding even more time I nkew teh rules I didn't follow 'em. Lesson learned but I do have a formula for some pretty decen building bricks...

  7. #57
    Sauerkraut stroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Oktoberfest
    Posts
    21,376
    I won't start my own thread until I'll get a decent result.

    I wouldn't want to feel a complete failure like FF.

  8. #58
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    prick

  9. #59
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    In a rather cold and dark place
    Posts
    12,823
    I have a couple of k's of rye flour here FF.


    Got it at Central something or other.

  10. #60
    Thailand Expat
    peterpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pleasantville
    Posts
    10,108
    You should be able to buy Rye flour in CM, even Tops in Udon keeps it in stock. I am afraid with the flours I am able to buy here I can't get a decent texture, its not bad but the crumb softness isn't what I need so I cheat by adding a small amout (1tsp) of bread improver. Much improved oven spring and softer crumb structure.
    There canít be good living where there is not good drinking

  11. #61
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    You might try down below the Nawarat bridge by the TAT office at a Rimping market, they had quite a variety of stuff, even had Masa last time I was there, but haven't lived in CM in a good number of years.

  12. #62
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    Yeah Rim Ping probably the best shot theyy got three branches now. Figger I'l go shopping on Monday maybe get soem corn meal if I'm lucky. Think I'll go ahead and get a few varieties of flours while I'm at it. By mid week I should have al teh bugs worked out.
    Sure wish it'd warm up though, make things a helluva lot easier I liked this kinda weather I'd a stayed in SF. Thinkin' of buyin a heater.

  13. #63
    punk douche bag
    ChiangMai noon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    o dan y bryn
    Posts
    29,257
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    Sure wish it'd warm up though, make things a helluva lot easier I liked this kinda weather I'd a stayed in SF. Thinkin' of buyin a heater.
    Big girls's blouse.

  14. #64
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    Ain't that the truth, Ya know that the coldest winter I ever spent in my life was a july in SF.

    Let me know if you find corn meal, I would like to make some scrapple but I can't find corn meal, I come to CM every August to renew my visa.

    Wonder if ya can make scrapple with Masa?? Make some good tortillas anyway tho.

  15. #65
    Sauerkraut stroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Oktoberfest
    Posts
    21,376
    There is corn meal for sale opposite Chiang Rai bus terminal, on the main rd, if that's any good. Couple o' shops selling rice, beans and related stuff.

    On a local level, they've got some roughly ground which you'd need to sieve, they use for animal feed. I would think you could get this throughout Thailand.

  16. #66
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    What I need is the same as is used for corn meal mush and under bread in the oven, roll fish in it before frying, I think the next size down would be a coarse Masa, then the better Masa is a tad finer ground for better tortillas.
    We got some of that rough almost cracked corn stuff as when the Bro in law wanted to make corn whiskey, he got a flail mill and run a bunch of corn, but it didn't work for whiskey here, we tried it once at home too and the corn we got in Oregon was no good for whiskey either.
    Last edited by blackgang; 03-02-2007 at 10:53 PM.

  17. #67
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    21-10-2013 @ 04:26 PM
    Location
    Pattaya
    Posts
    49
    FF, a wrung out wet towel in the oven will do nicely, give you the crust with the slight crunch. It will bring your oven temp down a bit if it's a non-heated towel, so better to wet a hot towel. Misting the oven with a spray bottle every 60 seconds also works, but again, drops the oven temp down each time.

  18. #68
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    01-08-2007 @ 12:19 PM
    Posts
    97
    I completed my apprenticeship in a traditional European-style bakery making sourdoughs ciabatta focaccia and whathaveyou.

    You can't beat a sourdough made with a longtime dough and baked on the bed of a flatdeck oven.

    As for whether or not the yeast is safe, a few hundred years ago that's how all leavened bread was made. It was brewer at Heineken who first started growing yeast commercially and using it to ferment his brews. Bakers caught on, unfortunately, and now a lot of the bread your buy is produced in fully-automated factories using quicktime doughs (2 hrs from mixing to outoftheoven) pumped full of conditioners and other shit that shorten mixing, resting and proving times... But hey, that's modernity
    viva thai cuisine

  19. #69
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527

    Second effort

    Tried another loaf yesterday. This one was a bit better; edible, with chewy crust and at least a bread-like texture, great flavor.

    I took about a cup of rye flour, another of all-purpose flour tossed inteh bowl and added all my left over starter, about a cup or so. I mixed that up threw it in the oven (off) with a light bulb and forgot about it for abotu 18 hours or so. Here's what I had:


    Repeated all the above steps almost exactly and four hours later tossed that in the oven, this time on top of some cornmeal. I baked it in a about 170 - 180.
    came out looking like this after cooling:


    pot of coffee and a these were my breakfast.


    As you can see, the loaf is still too fuckin flat. As I said I did thing almost exactly as before this includes forgetting the fuckin salt!!!! The crust is, if anything better than before. The "crumb" (I figger that means texture) is bit too fine but the bread is not heavy, "robust" may be a good description. The flavor, slightly flat with some tang by adding salted butter the tanginess of the bread sort of leaps to the fore. It'll be good with my chili tonight for sure.

    Doing a failure analysis on this loaf I'd say I'm making progress if I can get my "I spenty the sixties and seventies in the SF bay area," mind wrapped around remembering the salt! Even had it laid out
    The bread needs to rise a bit longer than the four hours I gave it after kneading it. I'm not real sure but I imagine different yeast cultures will rise at differing rates and I'm gonna have to experiment a little more to get it right.This bread is very edible and tastes better than anything I've bought here in CM so far. I had a few slices last night before bed with olive oil cracked pepper and salt and a few slices with butter this mornin.

    I really need to plan with this culture and makign the bread requires a couple days. gettign the "sponge" up is the time consumer here. Now If I can just remember the goddam salt...

  20. #70
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    ^ Oh yeah, I reserved a cup or so of the starter from the sponge for next time...

  21. #71
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    The rate you use your starter maybe you should wait a few days and get the pot built up to half dozen cups so you would have about half volume of starter left.

  22. #72
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527

    At Last!!!

    Didn't forget the salt this time
    II used only starter, flour (three kinds), water and salt. The flavor is out of this world, tangy like the best SF sourdough. I am truly surprised it is this goddam good! Easily the best tasting bread I've had in five years. maybe ever.
    I do have some issues with the loaf shape though I am sure this just purely from lack of proper kneading. My righ hand is still extremely painful and stiff and tires easily.
    I did not change the routine, I let the sponge build up over about 18 hours BUT I then tossed in a heaping teaspoon of salt, knead in rye Maybe a scant cup and maybe 1.5 cups of bread flour and 2 cups of all-purpose flour these are estimations
    The crust is not as browned but still quite chewy the texture of the bread is perfect There is a minor seam running through the loaf, again this is from improper kneading and forming.
    No sugar, no packaged yeast or baking soda/powder. I am quite pleased and will not be buying bread anymore. I eat less than a loaf a week, with this bread that may increase a bit but not much Oh, here's a pic

  23. #73
    Sauerkraut stroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Oktoberfest
    Posts
    21,376
    Looks yummy, like the proper German bread in my wishful-thinking!

  24. #74
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    The above loaf was beautiful to look at and tangy-tasty but I was unhappy with the shape of the loaf. I started this project with only what I remembered from baking sourdough twenty-plus years ago. Since starting, I have scoured the net. There is a huge amount of folks out there baking sourdough bread and there seem to be methods/formulas for each one of 'em.
    Latest loaf:


    I've found formulas calling for 1/2 cup of starter to three - four cups flour, and others that call for a 50/50 ratio. There are those that say salt is a must; others that say "you can bake bread without salt." One of the key differences is in care and feeding of the starter, and development of the"sponge." Some constants emerge here too, length of time spent in the sponge state give the bread a more "sour" flavor.

    I have built my starter up so that There is a bowl constantly in the "sponge" state and I am adding that directly to a pile of flour in an approximate 3:4 ratio this is yielding much better loaf shapes but I am getting a fine crumbed, yet light loaf. Although slightly less tangy, this is definitely a sour bread; great flavor.

    I can make sandwiches out of this loaf, good flavor but it is just not swelling up like I want it too.

    I went out an bought a slab of granite for working the dough and an unpolished piece of marble for a baking stone. These things seem to help as you can see the bottom exhibits a nice "oven spring" and less splitting on the bottom. the granite allows a slightly wetter dough to be worked longer without too much flour added. I am also baking at much higher temperatures (230 - 240 degrees) with better results.

    I will adjust the salt down to help promote yeast activity, this loaf has a flavor and crumb similar to sourdough pretzels. Still good, and tastes best without butter, or any other condiments. it will be perfect for those sandwiches with some good mustard, horse radish and slabs of flavorful meat.



    I;ve come to the conclusion that each unique yeast culture requires a bit of experimentation to find the method that works best. Nothing to enter into the county fair bake-off yet but I am enjoying the results.

  25. #75
    Member
    Anonymous Coward's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    20-04-2007 @ 07:55 PM
    Location
    Ratsima - The Bakersfield of LoS
    Posts
    923
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie
    an unpolished piece of marble for a baking stone
    Why did you choose marble for the baking stone? Is there some reason why granite wouldn't do?

    My new kitchen is only a month or so away and I'm thinking about what sort of baking stone to get. The last one I had was ceramic and it didn't last long.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •