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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Flood damage - Parquet Floor

    Our parquet floor has been damaged due to the food but i have a question regarding cementing over and replacing with tiles. This room drops about 4" below the living room, so to level it off would require quite an amount of cement and i was wondering if it would be ok just to cement straight over it once the wood has dried. Or should i rip it up to be on the safe side.

    Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Loy Toy's Avatar
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    Rip up the wood mate.

    Tiles are so much more practical and don't forget to use a good ceramic adhesive and make sure the floor is perfectly clean of dust and loose material. The Weber product although a little more expensive is far better than the locally made ceramic adhesive.

  3. #3
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    Yep, we had to rip up our parquet floors in the old house after we'd been flooded.

    Tiles are the way to go!

  4. #4
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    As others have said, rip it up. After the demo be sure to allow the bare concrete to dry fully. fill all cracks or gaps with sealer using epoxy if possible. Next put a coat of clear sealer over the entire surface to insure water will not enter either direction. Big job, hope you have a reliable tile person?

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Thought so. Thanks people.

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    I thought mine had dried out but then it started to smell and a few area's started to bow a little. That wood had to go.

  7. #7
    Member Rigsby's Avatar
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    Sandwash is a better alternative.

  8. #8
    Member IceSpike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy
    Rip up the wood mate.
    Ditto!

  9. #9
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    Leave em down! then regret it until you eventually have to rip em up

  10. #10
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    If you have a 4" drop Jesus I would as others have said rip up the wood ( not easy if its been glued down properly ) then how about tanking it up to the 4" level before pouring the cement in to tile it , then IF it happens again the water wont damage up to that level .

    Good luck mate
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    sunsetter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigsby
    Sandwash is a better alternative.
    inside a house?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    This room drops about 4" below the living room, so to level it off would require quite an amount of cement
    not a big problem, just get a truckload pumped in (after ripping out the parquet)

    it is always nicer to have a level floor without steps, when possible

    before cementing, lay sheets of plastic down to help keep any damp out

    you may have a problem if there is a door there, that would have to be refitted
    I have reported your post

  13. #13
    FarangRed
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    You beat me to it, Dr, I always put down a plastic membrane to stop any rising damp

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt
    Next put a coat of clear sealer over the entire surface to insure water will not enter either direction.
    Quote Originally Posted by FarangRed
    I always put down a plastic membrane to stop any rising damp
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    lay sheets of plastic down to help keep any damp out
    Forgive my ignorance but if you seal the base concrete (as above) how does the tile adhesive form a proper base?

    Before I tile I always soak the tiles and splash water on the floor before I lay the tiles.

  15. #15
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    ^OK LT we forgive you

    the plastic membrane is to go under the new concrete slab, if he wants to do that job first

    the tiles would then be laid on the concrete

    splashing water on the floor and tiles is not necessary, unless you are using porous tiles

    and if you use good tile adhesive, a no-no

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    the plastic membrane is to go under the new concrete slab, if he wants to do that job first
    How is that a better insulator than an inch of leveled sand?

    "unless you are using porous tiles"

    I thought all tiles are porous, that's why the tiles stick to the cement by absorbing it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan View Post
    If you have a 4" drop Jesus I would as others have said rip up the wood ( not easy if its been glued down properly ) then how about tanking it up to the 4" level before pouring the cement in to tile it , then IF it happens again the water wont damage up to that level .

    Good luck mate
    A 4" drop is about standard thickness for a concrete slab or sidewalk. Rip up the wood, lay down some wire mesh, get a concrete finisher, and call a concrete truck to pour it. Easy to do and less problems later. Tile it and forget it.

  18. #18
    Member Rigsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    the plastic membrane is to go under the new concrete slab, if he wants to do that job first
    How is that a better insulator than an inch of leveled sand?

    "unless you are using porous tiles"

    I thought all tiles are porous, that's why the tiles stick to the cement by absorbing it.
    It's known as a DPM.It's used to prevent rising damp.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    the plastic membrane is to go under the new concrete slab, if he wants to do that job first
    How is that a better insulator than an inch of leveled sand?

    "unless you are using porous tiles"

    I thought all tiles are porous, that's why the tiles stick to the cement by absorbing it.

    by "insulator" I presume you mean damp proof course. Plastic is easier to lay and put cement on than an inch of sand, therefore more reliable

    and all tiles are not porous; the back may be but the glazed front is not

    porous tiles are those that breathe, like quarry tiles

    as for his problem, the cheapest thing to do is lay new tiles with cement (as most tilers do in Thailand), then no need to seal or worry about any residual damp

    I was talking about raising the floor level 4" as well

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