Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 11:00 AM
    Posts
    6,952

    Flood Damage? (Home)

    At present there is approximately 70cm of water in my home. Other than the obvious, what are the steps required to put things back to normal?

    Once the floods start to recede the first thing will be to pump the water out, but should i also use a dehumidifier to help with the damp? With regards to damage to the walls i'm assuming the cement/plaster will have to be taken off. Typically, how far up above the flood mark does it need to be. Or alternatively, would it be better to take it all off back to the brick work and use gypsum boarding to finish the walls instead.

    Any input appreciated

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Jesus Jones; 11-11-2011 at 04:09 PM.
    You bullied, you laughed, you lied, you lost!

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    dirtydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pattaya Jomtien
    Posts
    58,775
    The walls should just need cleaning and repainting, generally they are just a rendered finish with cement and sand.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat
    khmen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    08-04-2019 @ 11:46 PM
    Location
    Discombobulated
    Posts
    2,455
    You'll definitely need dehumidifiers. Also, the plaster etc will all definitely have to be stripped off if its been in contact with flood water for a while. I think the main thing you need to worry about first is the disinfecting and mold control. Companies specialising in it are obviously going to be busy at the minute, and probably very expensive, so try and get in touch with one ASAP.

    Good luck, hope you get back to normal soon.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 11:00 AM
    Posts
    6,952
    The walls are actually cement i believe rather than plaster. There isn't a skim over the cement is what i mean. So what DD said might apply i think.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    khmen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    08-04-2019 @ 11:46 PM
    Location
    Discombobulated
    Posts
    2,455
    Still, might be worth having a google about preventing mold forming in flood damaged buildings...I'm not sure, you may be able to DIY to keep it from becoming a problem.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 11:00 AM
    Posts
    6,952
    ^Yes, I meant to say that too. Was just talking about the very thing with the wife yesterday.

    Thanks

  7. #7
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    Agree with both DD and khmen.

    Experienced same at a friend's house in Pai a couple of years ago.

    If the ground floor is pretty much sala style, open walls with lots of breeze getting through, a dehumidifier is not essential. If walled in, definitely get one going as concrete sucks up a lot of water and mould loves dark damp/humid places.

    Wash the floor out thoroughly first and disinfect it.
    Wash down the affected walls.

    Use a patent mould killer/fungicide (can ask at the chemist, or Google, or at your local hardware/building supply place), spray it on the walls, corners, hard to reach spots.

    Bleach also kills mould.

    Paint over the water stain when thoroughly dry after a few days.

    Dry out the wooden furniture in a breezy and shady place, adding a little wood oil as it dries, a bit at a time, wood furniture won't crack and warp too much then.

    Flat board tables and shelves can be kept from warping as they dry by piling some weight on them (concrete blocks) as they dry, shifting the blocks around a bit to avoid concentrations of damp between the blocks and the wood.

    Again, brush a little wood oil or kerosene (kills mould), or even cooking oil on the wood, it'll suck it up if it's dry, decreases the warp rate.

    Turn the fans on, or hot air type blower heater.

    Sit down and have a well earned cuppa or beer when you've finished in the evening.

    Good luck mate.

    Oh, those dehumdifier/renovator blokes will charge you the earth for a quite simple but time consuming job, fungicide and all.

    That's the best I know.
    Last edited by ENT; 12-11-2011 at 04:11 AM.

  8. #8
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    Watch out for snakes hiding, they're flood victims also, escaping the wet.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat superman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Last Online
    30-03-2013 @ 10:45 AM
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    4,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    Once the floods start to recede the first thing will be to pump the water out
    Pump it out to where ? You just have to wait until the water recedes itself. All ground water will be contaminated for years to come.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:29 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    17,436
    http://www.redcross.org/www-files/Do..._lang0_150.pdf

    Repairing Your Flooded Home - Red Cross

  11. #11
    Tonguin for a beer
    Bung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Last Online
    25-09-2016 @ 09:58 PM
    Location
    Wat Bung
    Posts
    3,845
    Get yourself a pressure washer and let rip.

  12. #12
    Member Rigsby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    19-12-2015 @ 10:02 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    85
    If the rendering is not damaged when dry,clean it with sugar soap and repaint.If
    it's badly stained,I'd suggest applying a coat of concrete primer to prevent it
    showing through at a later date.

  13. #13
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    ^ Good advice.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Last Online
    19-10-2014 @ 09:24 PM
    Location
    Bangkok/LA
    Posts
    72
    My friend in Chang Mai was flooded a few months ago as i am now in Bangkok.
    He said Bleach does not work....there are posts from us gov after the new orleans flood that gave a formula of chemicals that work well to kill mold and spores. [at] componets were Boric acid and hydrogen peroxide..the others i forgot..i'll look for it. He said wood door frames most likely will rot out and any wood furnitue must be cleaned and relaqured..his trees died as well..just fell over!

  15. #15
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    Worked for a while in the prison system NZ, the PD blokes were issued bleach and brushes to clean mould off fences, walls etc. Elbow grease bleach and brush shifted the lot.
    Did same in Pai (after a flood) and a guest house in Chiangmai (daily cleaning)
    Bleach, brush and elbow grease did the "miracle" again.

    Thais like to use killer juice on anything, think a bucket of the stuff is better than a dab.
    Lazy buggers, dab it on, sit down, watch to see if it works,
    Can't see nothing happening, so pour some more on, waiting for it to go.

    They do NOT use a lot of elbow grease, too lazy

    The Burmese girls worked harder, so shifted shit faster.

    Similar to the NZ girls dying of pesticide in CM a while back, the Thai style use of chemicals is horrifying, just overdose on the stuff, they love "kemeekal". work mac mac,.

    There's an add out in NZ about weed/moss killer.
    An Asian bloke with specs holding a can of "kemikal" (magic word in the east)
    And he says,'Just spray and walk away!"

    Indicates Thai attitude to getting rid of shite, no work involved.

    I tell ya bleach works, anyone who was as a guest of HM prisons will tell you that too.

    Not poofy bleach, I mean the stuff that stinks worse than cat's piss, ammonia bleach.
    Maybe hard to get in Thailand as the place is full of seppo phony crap that Thais like.

    Boric acid is not necessary, nor is hydrogen peroxide(expensive), ammonia bleach, sugar soap, bristle brush, elbow grease and hot water does the trick.

    Failing all that, laundry detergent and hot water, or carbolic soap and hot water or if nothing else available, caustic soda and cold water (wear gloves) and in the end, there is good old strong salt solution, and elbow grease.
    Last edited by ENT; 12-11-2011 at 05:46 PM.

  16. #16
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    Anyone tries to tell you otherwise is prolly trying to make a fast buck out of a marked up item he was sold when he was pissed one day and has to get rid of the lot.

  17. #17
    Member BillyBobThai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Last Online
    31-05-2015 @ 05:35 AM
    Posts
    492

    Do Not Mix Bleach & Ammonia

    Do not under any circumstances mix bleach and ammonia. The ammonia will liberate chlorine gas from the bleach and can be deadly. I made this mistake 40 years ago. Each by themselves are good cleaners, but never mix. Forget the ammonia, as it is hard to find in large amounts. Bleach alone is much better, but you need good ventalation. Good luck.
    “The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.”

  18. #18
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    Agree.
    DONT mix the stuff together, use either or.

    Chlorine gas is what results from the mix.

    Chlorine bleach works well enough on its own, so does ammonia.

    When cleaning lavatories/urine soaked floors etc the ureic acid in urine mixes with the ammonia producing chlorine gas, a poison if inhaled.

    Was used in the past to wash out cattle and sheep pens. trucks, but always in the open air with lots of water.

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat
    DrAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    25-03-2014 @ 05:29 PM
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    32,028
    they sell two types of Clorox here; one contains 5% bleach, the other 90% (?)

    the latter is the one to use, although it stinks and can be poisonous to breathe

  20. #20
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    ^ That's the one to use, the stinky one. Works well, rinse down after scrubbing hard.

  21. #21
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    ^ Don't tell your Thai GF, but it will bleach skin too!!!!

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Last Online
    19-10-2014 @ 09:24 PM
    Location
    Bangkok/LA
    Posts
    72
    ok..so you guys are bleach fans..i have no experience but my friend was sucessful with the chemicals mentioned. Can anyone tell me where my mail (postal service) is going . My house is under water for 1 more month..do they store it at the local post off (flooded) or just toss it? I don't know how to start a thread to ask this

  23. #23
    ENT
    ENT is offline
    god
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bangladesh
    Posts
    28,220
    ^ Normal practice is to keep it at the PO until deliveries resume.

    Drop in and ask (if it's not flooded too) or call them.

    Good luck.

    Re. the mould, sugar soap cleans well, as previous poster mentioned.
    Go over with disinfectant after.

  24. #24
    sabaii sabaii
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Worked for a while in the prison system NZ, the PD blokes were issued bleach and brushes to clean mould off fences, walls etc. Elbow grease bleach and brush shifted the lot.
    Sounds like you were the other side of the bars

    What does PD stand for ?

    Perverted Deviant ?

  25. #25
    FarangRed
    Guest
    hydrochloric acid that will clean black algae, then jet wash it of we use it as lot around the pools and on sandwash.

    If you want to use bleach why not buy some chlorine and water it down?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •