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  1. #1
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    Another slack job in the LoS...

    Having recently moved into the Mae Tang house, the Grape and I are embarking on what looks like a long term job in making it 'ours' (it was built by the previous owner); we love the place and being out in the sticks suits us.
    I ramble, back to topic - We have a typical one above the other bathroom set up and the downstairs bathroom was up for some attention to sort out the appalling lighting. Upon removing the old light fitting from the plaster board (gypsum actually) I see above not a fine slab of concrete as one would expect between bathrooms but those poxy concrete sections - so down came the ceiling...



    Needless to say, there is moisture making it's way down through the gaps from the bathroom above, particularly the shower side. Moisture hadn't actually been apparent on (or through) the gypsum plates but I would imagine it would only be a matter of time...



    The upstairs bathroom is tiled overall and gets water exposure pretty much all over with the shower (left) getting the most of it.



    So, short of tearing all of the tiles up and treating the entire area and re-tiling is there an alternative anyone is aware of? I was thinking that perhaps the shower area could be sealed and then fit a door across the front...
    de gustibus non est disputandum

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by graym View Post

    So, short of tearing all of the tiles up and treating the entire area and re-tiling is there an alternative anyone is aware of? I was thinking that perhaps the shower area could be sealed and then fit a door across the front..

    .
    Probably the best solution. Put a door in front of the shower area and just re tile the shower area. Worth digging up the old tiles just to dry it out before applying a water sealant coat , and then retiling.

  3. #3
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    Jesus christ I hope you clean those tiles normally and have not done in this instance as your going to pull them up, imagine this shit growing in that grout.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    The cost of labour for ripping out the tiles, sealing the concrete properly and retiling would be minimal.

    The up side being "job done".

    IMO don't hold back. Get it done proper and then have the luxury of not worrying about it.

    p.s. also gives you the chance to put down some decent tiles instead of those ghastly things you've got.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by graym
    I see above not a fine slab of concrete as one would expect between bathrooms but those poxy concrete sections
    that is quite normal and not a big problem, as long as a proper sealing coat is applied before tiling (as you are now going to do)

    in addition, use a good quality cement and a waterproof grout - make sure the grout is forced well into the gaps

  6. #6
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    Yep to all of the above......and then it might also be be worth considering one of those fibreglass or PVC shower floors or units with all the funky nozzles for washing the nether regions :-)

  7. #7
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    Sorry if I've missed something, but who or what is "The Grape"?


  8. #8
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    ^His 'significant other', I'd imagine.

  9. #9
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    Try grouting it properly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by khmen View Post
    Sorry if I've missed something, but who or what is "The Grape"?

    Yes, the Mrs - long story...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by graym View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by khmen View Post
    Sorry if I've missed something, but who or what is "The Grape"?

    Yes, the Mrs - long story...
    Does she come in bunches?

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the input people

    Quote Originally Posted by jandajoy
    The cost of labour for ripping out the tiles, sealing the concrete properly and retiling would be minimal. The up side being "job done". IMO don't hold back. Get it done proper and then have the luxury of not worrying about it. p.s. also gives you the chance to put down some decent tiles instead of those ghastly things you've got.
    Yes JJ this will be the way forward, I guess my idle side was looking for an easy fix! The tiles came with the house and not only are they 'ghastly' (thanks!) but slippery as well so I'll be happy to see them go.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    that is quite normal and not a big problem, as long as a proper sealing coat is applied before tiling (as you are now going to do) in addition, use a good quality cement and a waterproof grout - make sure the grout is forced well into the gaps
    I think I was a little put out by a sparky who came around for a look see at the creative wiring in this house and said "No one uses this between bathrooms..."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by graym
    I think I was a little put out by a sparky who came around for a look see at the creative wiring in this house and said "No one uses this between bathrooms..."
    wonder what he meant

  14. #14
    Crepitus
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    Quote Originally Posted by graym View Post
    Having recently moved into the Mae Tang house, the Grape and I are embarking on what looks like a long term job in making it 'ours' (it was built by the previous owner); we love the place and being out in the sticks suits us.
    I ramble, back to topic - We have a typical one above the other bathroom set up and the downstairs bathroom was up for some attention to sort out the appalling lighting. Upon removing the old light fitting from the plaster board (gypsum actually) I see above not a fine slab of concrete as one would expect between bathrooms but those poxy concrete sections - so down came the ceiling...



    Needless to say, there is moisture making it's way down through the gaps from the bathroom above, particularly the shower side. Moisture hadn't actually been apparent on (or through) the gypsum plates but I would imagine it would only be a matter of time...



    The upstairs bathroom is tiled overall and gets water exposure pretty much all over with the shower (left) getting the most of it.



    So, short of tearing all of the tiles up and treating the entire area and re-tiling is there an alternative anyone is aware of? I was thinking that perhaps the shower area could be sealed and then fit a door across the front...
    We have much the same set up but the concrete planks you refer to were covered with mesh reinforced concrete as was the whole upper floor.
    Think I would be inclined to rip up the upper bathroom floor tiles put a skin of waterproofed cement over then weak cement mix as tile base....maybe add an additional drain or two? That sort of thing is not that expensive here and really not that scary.....
    Do make sure you have a level handy while they do it..seems to be the practice here to slope tile floors away from drains...lol WE have squeegees in both our bathrooms..guess I will fix it one day

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