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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat
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    Thai House Plans - 500,000baht House

    I shall be uploading some of the Thai Government approved house plans, ie these are plans they have already used and accepted and the houses have been built.

    This first one is a small 2 bedroom 1 bathroom house, reckon you could build it for around 500,000baht, although you could easily double that price with a nice bathroom and kitchen, probably need to use the car port as a kitchen though, anyway here is the floor plan, this has been cropped and resized for the forum, the plans that you download are full size and just need to be printed out.



    Some rendered model pictures of the outside of the house, probably could do with changing the windows and making the roof pitch a bit steeper.







    Download the full set of plans here Houseplans07.zip

    More Thai House Plans, please note the page wont be finished till next week so the layout is not finished on the page.

    More Thai House Plans here.

  2. #2
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    Thats about the size of yhe house I would want.Do ya know of A reputable company that will build it?

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    Just did major extensions to my wifes family house for us to live in. Would be similar in size to your plans with western kitchen and bathroom, cost under 300,000. I made sure it was built properly and has all the reinforcing etc that it should have.

    The plan you have seems to waste space for the car, moving the walls out and building a separate roof for the car would cost little more and give a lot more room in the house.

  4. #4
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    you could double the size without to much cost by putting it on stilts.
    Thats just like the house i rent here in Phuket then. Then u have place under to park cars/motorbikes etc. Total cost was about 650,000 b.
    then if u want add rooms its cheap.
    "I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol or insanity, but they've always worked for me" HST

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    I've never understood the Thai fashion for putting your car within the boundary of the house. Seems like a very expensive car port to me. Much better to incorporate the space, as suggested, into the house. Stilts are the most effective and cheapest way to solve all those problems, plot size can be small and the shade/breeze under the house keeps it cool.
    Further, I fail to understand the Thai obsession with US/UK/EU style housing. None of them suit this climate and the sooner the house buying public see the sense of building traditional Thai style houses in modern, efficient materials, the better.

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    Member Andrew Hicks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubik101 View Post
    I've never understood the Thai fashion for putting your car within the boundary of the house. Seems like a very expensive car port to me. Much better to incorporate the space, as suggested, into the house. Stilts are the most effective and cheapest way to solve all those problems, plot size can be small and the shade/breeze under the house keeps it cool.
    Further, I fail to understand the Thai obsession with US/UK/EU style housing. None of them suit this climate and the sooner the house buying public see the sense of building traditional Thai style houses in modern, efficient materials, the better.

    I agree with this last point entirely. It is extraordinary how reinforced concrete housing in Thailand fails to focus on air flow and coolness and is of a Euro-style that requires air conditioning. There must surely be a revolution in housing design in Thailand, though much needed revolutions are sometinmes slow in coming.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubik101
    I've never understood the Thai fashion for putting your car within the boundary of the house.
    Because Thais are stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by rubik101
    Further, I fail to understand the Thai obsession with US/UK/EU style housing.
    Because Thais are stupid.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubik101
    I've never understood the Thai fashion for putting your car within the boundary of the house
    Cars in Thailand cost more than the houses in a lot of cases

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hicks View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rubik101 View Post
    I've never understood the Thai fashion for putting your car within the boundary of the house. Seems like a very expensive car port to me. Much better to incorporate the space, as suggested, into the house. Stilts are the most effective and cheapest way to solve all those problems, plot size can be small and the shade/breeze under the house keeps it cool.
    Further, I fail to understand the Thai obsession with US/UK/EU style housing. None of them suit this climate and the sooner the house buying public see the sense of building traditional Thai style houses in modern, efficient materials, the better.

    I agree with this last point entirely. It is extraordinary how reinforced concrete housing in Thailand fails to focus on air flow and coolness and is of a Euro-style that requires air conditioning. There must surely be a revolution in housing design in Thailand, though much needed revolutions are sometinmes slow in coming.
    Seconded, though I suspect that you can build a very nice house with reinforced concrete if you actually attempt to design for the climate. Balconies, overhanging roof lots of shade and airflow.

  10. #10
    Member sadloser's Avatar
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    In my experience the prices intimated here are far too costly.

    I built a 180 sq m house for 300 k. Single story, three bedroom, 2 bathroom, large living room, separate dining room, detached kitchen that includes a room off, external wet room, laundry, car port, and converted an old barn into better strorage facility. All tiled, decent fittings throughout, excellent wiring to Euro standards, down lighting, walled and lit, air con, rendered, painted, gazebo and a garden that's well on it's way to maturing two years on.

    Currently I'm adding a garage cum workshop for a newly purchased Itan with facilties to make furniture. Basically, I'm concentrating all the wood working stuff in an organised fashion so we can cut, plane, joint, sand and varnish relatively in situ.

    The key with all of this was doing it yourself. The cost of materials are dirt cheap and any additional bought in labour is too.

    Really, it's Thailand and it should be cheap. But somebody is taking you for a quoting those prices.

  11. #11
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    Just had to add ...... those plans, my lap top is slow and has just shown the photos. I had a place like that when I rented; single occupancy, almost exactly the same, and the owner is knocking them out at 90k baht. That's ninety thousand baht.

    You work out the cost: sand, cement, wire, gravel, breeze blocks, 1 air con the most expensive single purchase, roofing, steel or wood trusses, windows, door, wiring and lighting, tiling and a toilet, electric shower, sink and taps [2].

    A thing like that is thrown up in a fortnight if you get the weather. Which of course you do.

    Some of you need to get out more and do your own shopping. You'll be surprised how much you can save.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadloser View Post
    In my experience the prices intimated here are far too costly.

    I built a 180 sq m house for 300 k. Single story, three bedroom, 2 bathroom, large living room, separate dining room, detached kitchen that includes a room off, external wet room, laundry, car port, and converted an old barn into better strorage facility. All tiled, decent fittings throughout, excellent wiring to Euro standards, down lighting, walled and lit, air con, rendered, painted, gazebo and a garden that's well on it's way to maturing two years on.

    Currently I'm adding a garage cum workshop for a newly purchased Itan with facilties to make furniture. Basically, I'm concentrating all the wood working stuff in an organised fashion so we can cut, plane, joint, sand and varnish relatively in situ.

    The key with all of this was doing it yourself. The cost of materials are dirt cheap and any additional bought in labour is too.

    Really, it's Thailand and it should be cheap. But somebody is taking you for a quoting those prices.
    Have to agree with sadloser. The price quoted is way too high unless you are building on a prime lot in Phuket. Saldloser's price is much more realistic here in Thailand.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadloser
    breeze blocks
    They don't use breeze blocks in these plans.

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    This has to be at least the 3rd plans thread where there is a small 3d model of the prospective home, do you guys build these or are the architects providing them? I think the models are a great way to keep the enthusiasm going because some builds can really drag out for various reasons.

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    Thailand Expat BigRed's Avatar
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    If I understand it properly these are complete architectural plans downloadable free of charge. They are effectively pre approved so no expensive paperwork. I think the models are built by people who build estates and will offer you a selection of styles but try to charge you without taking account of the fact that the plans are available free of charge and pre-approved.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadloser
    A thing like that is thrown up in a fortnight if you get the weather. Which of course you do. Some of you need to get out more and do your own shopping. You'll be surprised how much you can save.
    Well, I am building this house right now and have been doing so for the last 8 weeks.
    The Thai goverment webpage from where this drawing can be downloaded also have complete excel calculations for the cost of labour and material.
    The cost for this house complete with tax and everything was estimated to 579.000 baht seven years ago.

    I am building this house as a basic structure - ready for tiling of floor, fitting kitchen and bathroom, putting in doors and windows, building ceilings etc.
    My plan is to complete this little by little with my own work and using the help of local skilled workers for which the going rate is 250 baht/day.

    The 5 contracted workers should be finished with the basic structure in a week or so when they are done withe the plastering of the walls and som minor work on the roof.

    So far I have spent 223.928 baht on all material used.
    I doubt that shopping around for basic structure material will save any money if you donīt want to downgrade in quality.
    Prices for CPAC-roofs, cement, steel truss for roof, steel rebar etc are pretty much the same in all places you ask.

    I have altered the drawings to get more space and a door out from the kitchen area. The shower is also moved to the outside of the walls.
    The two bedrooms are now identical in size, 3,5x4,0 meter.



    All walls are built with double breeze-blocks in order to have the house cool inside, and to avoid the pesky thai posts sticking out from the walls.
    16 mm steel are used in the footings and the foundation to support the double wall.


    Here you can see the area for the 2 bedrooms.
    The original drawing have one big and one small bedroom that was changed by moving the wall to the center of the house to get them identical.






    An emty area of air is left between the double block wall for better insulation.
    This is also used to hide the electric wiring inside the walls.



    It is important to find a professional and skilled blacksmith/welder when it comes to putting the roof truss of steel together.


    The windows in the bedrooms are smaller than in the livingroom.
    There is an overhang with 1,5 meters from the roof that keeps the sun away from the windows most of the day.
    This will also keep the house dry during the rainy season.



    Door from kitchen area.



    Front of house. The shower area sticking out of the wall.



  17. #17
    KOBRIEN
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    Just a quick question regarding building a house in Thailand,Its not something im looking at doing for a few years yet but If I was to buy a plot of land more out in the country and money was not an issue in terms the size I wanted to build could I effectively build a mansion or is there restrictions on size / height ?

    I know you have to have planning permission in the U.K does this apply in Thailand ?

  18. #18
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    Yep, you have to get planning permission in Thailand but it is just a formality, size don't matter unless say the land is on some beach front so they may limit it to 4 stories high.

  19. #19
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    Cheers

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    Smile Good stuff

    Dirty Dog and Swede: Great posts; thanks for the info and graphics. I'll try to do a 500,000 baht house up in the NE, but I travel a lot and can't do much of the work myself. Still, I think you're right that's it's very doable.

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    Smile new build in the Philippines

    2 years ago I retired to the philippines ( tossed a coin, Phils won )My g/f had a single storey breezeblock, corrugated roof house. Not good in many ways, very noisy in the rain, easy access for bugs and rats.We decided to build over the existing using reinforced concrete for the new footings, pillars and floor beams.Local labour was used of course, very cheap.The final build was ground floor, apartment for rent, first floor living room, bedroom, kitchen, separate shower/toilet.spiral staircase to the rooftop on which a bamboo house was built in situ.Total cost to me was in the region of ten grand GBP. Sadly my relationship has dissolved so I'm now looking at moving to NE Thailand

  22. #22
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    [at] robin

    Well, in the NE you can get cheaper land and labor, that's for sure. Stop up for a Chang sometime.

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    stop up for a Chang

    thanks,

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    Ok I am totally confused, which is down to me I know. See so many rates per metre quoted? Buying own materials+labour costs for single storey building.

    3000 5000 7000 100000bht per sq m ? Western quality but not high end.

    Sorry for being thick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailing into trouble View Post
    Ok I am totally confused, which is down to me I know. See so many rates per metre quoted? Buying own materials+labour costs for single storey building.

    3000 5000 7000 100000bht per sq m ? Western quality but not high end.

    Sorry for being thick.
    • I understand you... What I got from my architect:

    • Structure alone: 8'500 THB/sqm
    • Fully finished, simple: 12'000 THB/sqm
    • Fully finished, mid end: 22'500 THB/sqm
    • Fully finished, high end (massiv wooden floor, expensive tiles): 30'000 THB/sqm
    • For the western-style kitchen: 100'000 THB for the running meter


    The 100'000+ THB/sqm are the costs when you are buying a condo (in Bangkok).

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