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  1. #1
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    Paint thinning - Thailand

    Lets get this sorted out for once and all, in the old days in the UK painting and decorating was a trade, with the advent of DIY it became a non trade, paint suppliers made paints that you could just use straight away, dulux was a big part of this, open the can and start painting, mention thinning down dulux gloss and you would probably be hanged, but we aint in England now boyo's.

    The majority of Thai paints are based on old chemical formulas, these need to be thinned down, if they are emulsion paints they need to be thinned with water, read the bucket, it will tell you how much thinning they need, personly first coat I like loads of water in the paint as it dries straight away, second coat a nice thick one and carry on from there.

    Oil based paints need thinners to thin them out, these aint some magical dulux paint that covers everything in one coat, for a nice job reckon on 4 coats, not so nice 3 coats, but remember, if your doing a nice piece of furniture in gloss, your probably going to do 8 coats with sanding down in between, all comes down to how good you want the finish, and every single one of them will have thinners mixed in with the gloss.

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    what I find annoying is that there are loads of different paints/varnishes/polyurethanes, and each one requires its own special thinners

    so even if you don't want to thin it, you will need it to clean your brushes

    in the Uk white spirit works for everything

  3. #3
    Newbie beelzebub's Avatar
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    paint

    I know that painting red on top of white is a nightmare, you need to kill the white off first, i used to use dark brown and then red on top of that. And don't skimp on brush quality, especially for gloss work.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    read the bucket

  5. #5
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    Those thinners used to be a huge problem in the past. Painting 1 hour made me sick for a few days, I hated it if I had to do it.

    Now there are paints and thinners available that are free or almost free of aromatic components. They smell very little and I can work with them without side effects.

    Are they available in Thailand too?

  6. #6
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    I just polyurethaned about 12 sq.m. of board for the interior of a wardrobe

    who needs drugs when you can just inhale TOAs best

  7. #7
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    Worked in the trade a very long time ago in UK.
    We used to recon no more than 10% for emulsion.
    Gloss, never.

  8. #8
    FarangRed
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    They used to put thinners in the winter to make it dry quicker but you could tell the gloss lost it's sheen.

    Here it does say on the bucket I seem to remember 10% water

  9. #9
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    Just like good old days in UK" - ICI Dulux paints are available in Thai HomePro building markets. They also supply a variety of high quality Scandinavian and German wood-care paints, oils and laquers.
    However TOA paint seems to be quite good, when choosing the right product (type of paint) for the job. Different thinners are available, see the can for the right one (number, fx. TOA 21).
    Most important is the preparation - the basepaint or the primer. Without the right preparation, the paint job won't last long.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by the dogcatcher View Post
    Worked in the trade a very long time ago in UK.
    We used to recon no more than 10% for emulsion.
    Gloss, never.
    Seems we were both taught the same Dogcatcher, seven years ago in Home Pro they would look at you as if you were crazy asking for undercoat, they do it now.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by the dogcatcher
    Gloss, never.
    Obviously not long enough ago, and its not gloss, its oil based paints, these cover a real big spectrum of paints, traditionally all paints were thinned down, then the diy trend started, using paints like dulux gloss, in the old days painters would have brushes made from badgers hair for marbling and wood graining, these were like 70 quid per brush, we're talking 25 years ago and more in the UK for those prices, nowadays I doubt you can buy a paint in the UK that you can thin down, but in Thailand most paints are meant to be thinned down, also you can think about the differences between UK and USA, UK we roller paint onto walls, USA they spray, you try getting that dulux emulsion through a spray gun

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    nowadays I doubt you can buy a paint in the UK that you can thin down
    of course you can; just add white spirit

    some of them recommend you do it for the first coat

  13. #13
    Member bushwacker's Avatar
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    Help please.

    I have just rented a shop house for a couple of years while planning for a new build. I want to paint the inside of the rental. It is an old shop and there is old paint on the walls (i would guess about 8 years old). Do I need to be concerned about what type of paint originally went on the wall, i.e. if new paint is latex and old is oil .... then big problems?

    Can I successfully put latex on oil or oil on latex? Do I need to condition the wall with a cleaner before painting? I have painted for years but like most the rules of the game were quite different.

    cheers

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Having found a source for Dulux Weather shield I'm tempted to use it on all the newly plastered walls, both in side and out.

    Once the plaster and stuff has cured properly, about 6 weeks

    2 coats, not thinned.

    We've also found a supplier of Cuprinol. Teak oil and wood preserver.

    I thought we might use the oil on all interior wood and then do the outside of the wooden house with the wood preserver.

    What about the wood shingled roof, though. Could we just spray it with the wood preserver?

    Any comments?


    pics of house here;

    http://teakdoor.com/construction-in-...hai-house.html

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushwacker
    It is an old shop and there is old paint on the walls (i would guess about 8 years old). Do I need to be concerned about what type of paint originally went on the wall, i.e. if new paint is latex and old is oil .... then big problems?
    usually emulsion paint would be used, esp. inside

    if the paint is sound, not flaking or dusty, yu can roll a couple of coats straight on. Prob can use a cheaper paint as it is not your place!

    if it is flaking etc, you will need to remove any loose paint then roll on a sealer before painting - that stuff stinks to use but is good
    I have reported your post

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandajoy
    I thought we might use the oil on all interior wood and then do the outside of the wooden house with the wood preserver. What about the wood shingled roof, though. Could we just spray it with the wood preserver?
    depends on the wood; if teak, just the oil gives good results, inside and out

    I haven't bothered with wood preserver in those situations; I would use it in places where wood is going to get damp or have insect attacks. The roof will get wet and dry out, I don't think it will have problems with fungal attack or insects

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    Having found a source for Dulux Weather shield I'm tempted to use it on all the newly plastered walls, both in side and out.

    Once the plaster and stuff has cured properly, about 6 weeks 2 coats, not thinned. QUOTE



    Jandajoy,
    I always give a coat of spirit based stabiliser on new plaster, then two coats of unthinned Weather Shield emulsion, they have it in Home Pro

  18. #18
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    I thought Paint Thinners in Thailand would be a DJPat thread.

    Apologies, i just noticed this is the construction forum.

    I fully accept the forthcoming deletion of this post or that it is MKP bound

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldgit
    Jandajoy, I always give a coat of spirit based stabiliser on new plaster, then two coats of unthinned Weather Shield emulsion, they have it in Home Pro

    Thanks for that. I hadn't thought about stabiliser.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandajoy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by oldgit
    Jandajoy, I always give a coat of spirit based stabiliser on new plaster, then two coats of unthinned Weather Shield emulsion, they have it in Home Pro
    Thanks for that. I hadn't thought about stabiliser.
    The Primer is the most important, when painting on plaster. A good Primer is TOA Quick Time 2-day (probably also the most expencieve, but worth it). Let the plaster dry out and then roll 2 times (unthinned) Primer, make sure it dries up between each coat and covers well. Then 2-3 coats of paint - best to leave each layer for a day to dry, before adding the next - and worth buying a good paint, especially for the outdoor walls. You may use a matte (satin) finish inside, whilst outdoor a semigloss will be best. The major problem (apart from the Sun) is the heavy rain, which may loosen the paint from the plaster. Also, cement is a chemical process, where you use the Primer to stop the chemicals from spoiling the paint.

  21. #21
    Newbie Powerhammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    Those thinners used to be a huge problem in the past. Painting 1 hour made me sick for a few days, I hated it if I had to do it.

    Now there are paints and thinners available that are free or almost free of aromatic components. They smell very little and I can work with them without side effects.

    Are they available in Thailand too?
    Yes they are available. I bought a few years ago an enamel with primer and thinner. It was called Gardex made by Jotun. Low odour paint.
    I have only used the primer so far as the plywood furniture that I made was made obsolete by my Gfs decision to buy something else.

  22. #22
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    I bought 4 liters of paint recently, and on the lid was this:

    If everything else fails, read the instructions!

    That reminded me of instructions on a piece of electronic equipment:

    Failure is not an option; it comes packaged with the software

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powerhammer
    I have only used the primer so far as the plywood furniture that I made was made obsolete by my Gfs decision to buy something else.
    nice one

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