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  1. #1
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    ootai's wife's Rice barn

    A lot of you will have no doubt had a look at the thread about my missus and the house she is building. Well as part of that she decided that no Thai house is complete without a rice barn. So this it was built, I found it quite interesting so i hope others get something from it as well and not only filled up a bit of time.

    This how it started with this tree and a few others. In the house build thread I asked about what this tree was called and a few thought it was a "yang na" which is a protected species, however it is not I have been told by those who know that it is a "don pluang". All I know is the wood is very hard.


    Anyway it first ended up here


    Then after a bit of work it ended up here. The guys who cut up the trees into timber are the ones who built the rice barn.


    This is where the raw timber was prepared ie planed


    More of the same. The pile of white bags in the background are whats left from last years mushroom growing exercise, but that is also another story.


    The main posts being notched and shaped.


    This the bottom end that goes onto the cement post


    This is the top end that takes the roof trusses.


    The cement posts. Each was matched with a wooden post and the holes drilled for the bolts.


    The roof trusses


    Location has been determined and the framework for the marking out installed.


    The holes are dug for the cement posts and the bottom filled with cement to get the posts level.


    The cement posts are in, the wooden posts bolts on and the cross beams fitted into their slots. All goes together like a jigsaw.


    A closer look.


    The roof trusses are put in place


    More of the same


    Starts to be recognisable.


    From a different angle


    and another


    well that's it then for now, I post further pictures of the completed job soon.

  2. #2
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    DrAndy's Avatar
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    nice rice barn, but it seems a shame to chop the tree down when you can buy an old rice barn and transport it easily enough

  3. #3
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    DrAndy
    Couldn't agree with you more. However the tree didn't come down to provide timber it came down as it didn't fit into the building of the new house. I reckon this breed of tree is the best I have seen around this place and I would love nothing better than to have more but.
    There's always a but isn't there? About 3 weeks ago we had a tremendous storm around this area, blocked highway 24nearby and the trees that came down most were these don pluang. They don't have a tap root system and with the wet ground they fell over in the very strong winds.

    The one in the photo was right on our boundary and would have reached the house if it had blwon over in the right direction, also the matter of building a wall (all Thai house must have a wall at the front). When we took it out we also discovered that the town water supply main line was detoured around the tree on our side so we will need to move that over a metre toward the road for a distance of 70m when the wall gets built.

    Most of the timber came from trees we removed on the farm while cleaning up a paddy.

  4. #4
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    Here's the rest of the rice house building project.

    The timber being planed into shape


    The roof timbers going on


    Viewed from a different angle


    Blocking in below the roof


    The door is made. It consists of boards that are slid up and out when access is needed.


    The floor boards are in


    The door from an different angle


    The finished product


    From a different angle. I asked the missus above the mess they left and apparently that's our problem. I then told her to make sure she tells our builder he won't be getting the final payment until his rubbish is cleaned up. Are Thais blind to a mess?


    With the new house in the background

  5. #5
    Member kiwinev's Avatar
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    Nice rice barn, simple and I presume, cheap to build.

  6. #6
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    Nice looking barn..quite modern-looking with it's kinky green tin-work..5-5-5.
    One point I noticed was the wooden lats blocking-in the triangular gable part
    above the door...so,so many Thais DO NOT block-up this part, and the birds/chickens
    enjoy the poor farmers profit every damn day by going in/out thru' this bit..!!

  7. #7
    Member cdnski12's Avatar
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    A nice Rice Grainary, as we call them in Canada. My DK/Cdn Buddy in Nong Khai paid for his Thai wife to build one the family farm near Bandung in Issan. It was all conc lower, metal framing & metal roof. "Goot for termice", my Thai GF says. I'd be concerned about "Termice" with all that wood in a wettish area. I gotta deal with the GF's "termice in da ruuf", as soon a sI show up in Bandung in a few days, per GF's emails. I can't understand why they don't spray themselves. In the 1970's, saw Rhodesians digging holes in their back gardens and stuffing all the tree cuttings into the hole. The termites loved the work and stayed out of the houses.

  8. #8
    Newbie padeedy's Avatar
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    This style of building is just like the mediaeval English and Welsh half-timbered structures. The British carpenters used to prefabricate the frame off-site from oak wood, much use of mortice and tenon joints. Every joint was marked with roman numerals so they could match up later. e.g. III to III, or VI to VI, etc.

    Do the Thais still do the same? And do they ever use wattle and daub?

  9. #9
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    Interesting construction and great pics of the work in progress.

  10. #10
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    kiwinev
    I'm not sure of the total cost. The bits I do know are B7000 for the guys to built it took the 3 of them about a week. The green corrugated sheeting B192 per sheet (fu*k*ing expensive but that's what she wanted). The timber well it cost the fee for getting the trees sawn up. So total, f*#k knows.

    usualsuspect
    the green "tin" was for the MIL as the missus said she asked for something a little different. The problem I have with it is its expensive (see above) and bloody thin. I reckon it'll tear apart when the first bag of rice gets thrown against it.

    cdnski12
    after spending quite a bit of time tidying up around the place I think you are right about leaving some wood lying around as food for the termites as they like the stuff half buried and therefore half rotten and soft to chew on.

    padeedy
    yes the guys did number the posts and joints so they could match them up after. I don't think I have ever seen one painted just leave it au natural.

    naja tom
    Thanks for the comment.

  11. #11
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    23-01-2017 @ 11:52 PM
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    Sure thing about the gauge of the 'wrinkly tin'..but looks good on the outside..
    ..and if need be you can soon nail some standard,cheaper/stronger stuff in the
    inside...(do it without fuss when the time comes so your lady not lose face over
    her initial choice of tin.. ) Still, a sturdy looking structure, well done,

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