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  1. #1
    tex
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    Best paint to use on new build

    Would be greatful for any advice on which are the best paints on the Thai market for a new build ?
    Also how long should the render be left to make sure its fully dry before painting ?
    Many thanks for any info

  2. #2
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    ICI, Jotun, Nippon, Berger or the more expensive TOA 4 Seasons are paints that work well here and based upon the extreme climate you experience in Thailand.

    Allow your render to dry for at least 1 week and use a good quality standard undercoat.

    Most paints are water based and if your render has not dried out 100% it is not a problem.

    One thing I have noticed here is that the Painting contractors water down the paint upwards of 30% which allows the paint more coverage per dollar but really they are ripping your off.

    Two coats are the norm and in shaded/ damp areas particularly adjacent to garden beds look at using anti-fungal paints.

  3. #3
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    ^wot he said, but id add that if there are areas that are going to get rained on hard (areas not protected by eaves) then use a waterproof sealer, dulux do a good one.
    a sealer coat of thinned down paint or primer and two full top coats to give a proper cover and finish that will last for years.

    paying that bit more fo a good quality paint is well worth it in the long run.


    make sure its a real bright 'orrible colour so that it stands out and the locals will love it.

  4. #4
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    Gotta be on site, especially during rendering and painting. Most workers paint directly over the rendering without a quality primer. Also workmen will exchange the quality paints mentioned above for cheap brands like Junior, then use your paint for their own. Sad but true.

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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by tango View Post
    Gotta be on site, especially during rendering and painting. Most workers paint directly over the rendering without a quality primer. Also workmen will exchange the quality paints mentioned above for cheap brands like Junior, then use your paint for their own. Sad but true.
    I'm doing the painting myself; something i don't mind doing and I take my time, when doing the woodwork was forever doing litle repairs, filler, nails along the way. With the concrete (we've walled-in part of downstairs, plus a bathroom/laundry block) the builder offered to paint - he was going to use '20 litres for 750 baht' - very cheap!

    Thanks for tips above; pointless having a nice finish coat of the primer/undercoat isn't going to last.

  6. #6
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    I used ICI paint on mine

    make sure that the first coat (undercoat) is made for new cement (i.e.anti-alkali). It will say on the tin

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    When money is not too much a problem for customers,I use this one for external wall :
    TOA 7IN1 Future Color | Technical Data

  8. #8
    FarangRed
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    I caught the bastards watering mine down

  9. #9
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    ^Traditional paints need to be watered down.
    Modern paints don't, Thailand still has a lot of traditional paints.

  10. #10
    FarangRed
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    ^yes I agree but not the amount these were doing, I think it say on the bucket about 10%

  11. #11
    FarangRed
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    I have an high wall around the house that get hammered in the rain we have had recently, when I bought the house 18 months ago it was a disgrace and I know that had only been painted not much more than 1 year before, so far so good on the outside but parts of the inside coz of the well water is red from the sprinkler system, I've just repainted some sections it was getting on my nerves rite outside the kitchen windows

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarangRed View Post
    I caught the bastards watering mine down
    Ok.

    Firstly most modern paints are water based. Where once upon a time we would use turps to thin oil based paints now we use plain water to thin and clean water based paints.

    Secondly the ideal situation on porus surfaces like bricks, plaster and render is to have the surface clean and dry (DUST is the number 1 problem) and to use a very watered down initial coat to penetrate and seal. Once this is dried it can be cleaned (remember dust will mean the layers of paint will not adhere) and then repainted with a full coat. Painting on a wet surface can lead to the paint drying like a sheet of paper without properly adhering to the previous coat this can also be a problem in high humidity conditions.

    Thirdly the method of application can help or harm if you have the above noted dusty or wet (humid) conditions. Brushing has the most mechanical action to an extent will mix any contaminants with the layer of paint which can help adhesion is poorly prepared surfaces in poor conditions. Rolling has some mechanical action but is very limited in mixing contaminates into the paint particularly if the rolling strokes are light or if the paint is thick. Spray painting has no mechanical action and relies completely on preparation and the inteligent use of a brush to brush in areas that will be hard to coat properly or that may not have adequate preparation.

    The preparation of the surfaces will far exceded the quality of the paint in determining the lifetime of the coating.

    Thicker is not better. Thinner paint applies better and adheres better. It is better to use two thinner coats than one thick coat. Trying to apply a thick coat by roller is very difficult as the initial area of contact almost always gets a much thicker coat and the rolled out areas get a thinner coat. This can lead to a patchy finish because of uneven drying times and degredation of the paints durability because of the uneven coating thickness.

    Prep in times when rain is more likely and paint in times when it is not there is nothing more disheartening to finish an area and just before it cures enough rain washes most of it and makes a nasty mess!

    For the best finish lightly sand and wash between coats, yes its a lot of work but this will mean each coat is more perfect than the one underneath. On the finish coat use you best equipment dont be tempted use the old brush that is going bald faster than you are or the roller that leaves nice chunks behind.


    Mark

  13. #13
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    Blackish Stain on Painted Concrete

    I'm new to this Thai environment and desiring to repaint Thai wife's townhouse. Like so many other concrete structures I see around Thailand it has a large number of sizable blackish spots that I assume are associated with the very damp environment at times, and particularly when the concrete was new. In the states I've seen this in damp areas, and its recommended to use a product called Kilz prior to repainting.

    What is the best treatment (and product) to use here in Thailand?

  14. #14
    Member brianxx's Avatar
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    Ok.

    Firstly most modern paints are water based. Where once upon a time we would use turps to thin oil based paints now we use plain water to thin and clean water based paints.

    Secondly the ideal situation on porus surfaces like bricks, plaster and render is to have the surface clean and dry (DUST is the number 1 problem) and to use a very watered down initial coat to penetrate and seal. Once this is dried it can be cleaned (remember dust will mean the layers of paint will not adhere) and then repainted with a full coat. Painting on a wet surface can lead to the paint drying like a sheet of paper without properly adhering to the previous coat this can also be a problem in high humidity conditions.

    Thirdly the method of application can help or harm if you have the above noted dusty or wet (humid) conditions. Brushing has the most mechanical action to an extent will mix any contaminants with the layer of paint which can help adhesion is poorly prepared surfaces in poor conditions. Rolling has some mechanical action but is very limited in mixing contaminates into the paint particularly if the rolling strokes are light or if the paint is thick. Spray painting has no mechanical action and relies completely on preparation and the inteligent use of a brush to brush in areas that will be hard to coat properly or that may not have adequate preparation.

    The preparation of the surfaces will far exceded the quality of the paint in determining the lifetime of the coating.

    Thicker is not better. Thinner paint applies better and adheres better. It is better to use two thinner coats than one thick coat. Trying to apply a thick coat by roller is very difficult as the initial area of contact almost always gets a much thicker coat and the rolled out areas get a thinner coat. This can lead to a patchy finish because of uneven drying times and degredation of the paints durability because of the uneven coating thickness.

    Prep in times when rain is more likely and paint in times when it is not there is nothing more disheartening to finish an area and just before it cures enough rain washes most of it and makes a nasty mess!

    For the best finish lightly sand and wash between coats, yes its a lot of work but this will mean each coat is more perfect than the one underneath. On the finish coat use you best equipment dont be tempted use the old brush that is going bald faster than you are or the roller that leaves nice chunks behind.


    Mark
    Hi Mark,
    Sounds like you know what you are talking about. I visited a Home Pro store tonight with my wife, and we had a discussion in Thai (that I don't know how to speak) with a young lady that appeared to have some good basic knowledge of the TOA products we were asking about. However as the conversation went on further and my wife did a little interpetation I got the feeling that somehow NOT all things were adding up.

    I thought I might come home an see if I could make things jive with info on the TOA website.....wait a minute, maybe I just didn't find the proper page(s) on their website as I've never seen such a disorganized bunch of stuff. Can't they have a straight forward products page that might list their various exterior grade paints with an explantion of the differences in the various grades....economy, med grade, higher grade, superior. Is that too much to ask here in LOS ??

    Please correct me where I am wrong, but from what I surmise the "4-Seasons" grade is their lowest grade exterior paint, the next grade up is their "7-in-1" (and it is somewhat of a side show paint for certain applications), then comes their "Extra Shield" (10yrs), and finally the Super Shield (15yrs). Does that sound correct?

    What seemed odd is that the Super Shield and the 4-seasons was sold in the real big (contractor) size buckets, but the Extra Shield was supposely not??

    Maybe I should visit a TOA store directly for a contrasting opinion and knowledge. Is there a possiblity of finding one with an english speaking salesperson?...and around Khon Kaen??
    Last edited by brianxx; 16-02-2012 at 11:19 PM.

  15. #15
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    I would use the TOA Supershield for your house; it is a good paint and will last

    the 4 Seasons would be fine for inside

    from your ancient post, you will need to use the primer that containd anti-fungi; it stinks to use but is effective

  16. #16
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    so Brian, what takes 2 years to paint!!?

  17. #17
    Member brianxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    so Brian, what takes 2 years to paint!!?
    Ha...ha, you caught me there. I made that original inquiry not long after our marriage and my desire to look into redoing her townhouse. First we had to iron out some differences in opinions , then start out slowly with some tile work and other painting, then the purchase of the adjacent townhouse, etc, etc . And I am only living here part time still, and desiring to 'oversee' some of my investments in work contracted for (particularly after reading some of the horror stories on these forums).

    Besides our place wasn't that bad that things needed to be done in a rush.

  18. #18
    Member brianxx's Avatar
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    Nippon House Paint in Thailand?

    ..I thought I might come home an see if I could make things jive with info on the TOA website.....wait a minute, maybe I just didn't find the proper page(s) on their website as I've never seen such a disorganized bunch of stuff. Can't they have a straight forward products page that might list their various exterior grade paints with an explantion of the differences in the various grades....economy, med grade, higher grade, superior. Is that too much to ask here in LOS ??


    Now here is a proper website for paint products
    http://www.nipponpaint.com.my/

    Does anyone know if you can get Nippon house paint in Thailand?? I would seriously consider this product as they aren't trying to treat me like a mushroom (growning mushrooms involves keeping you in the dark, and feeding you sh*t)
    Last edited by brianxx; 17-02-2012 at 10:01 AM.

  19. #19
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    TOA has good paints, at all levels

    Mushroom paints are available too

  20. #20
    Member brianxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlbraun View Post
    When money is not too much a problem for customers,I use this one for external wall :
    TOA 7IN1 Future Color | Technical Data
    That one says you use a solent based primer for older surfaces...I assume they mean painted ones??

  21. #21
    Member brianxx's Avatar
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    Prep Work

    I have just about decided to just go for the best, top of the line Super Shield from TOA. Theres just not that much difference in price to make it a worthwhile project when you consider that 90% of a paint job is PREPARATION.

    Now if I can just instill in these young guys doing the prep work, that it needs to be done throughly. I did the balconey areas out front with a good hand brush and small wire brush, and that took me the better part of a day, with LOTS of scrubbing.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianxx View Post
    I have just about decided to just go for the best, top of the line Super Shield from TOA. Theres just not that much difference in price to make it a worthwhile project when you consider that 90% of a paint job is PREPARATION.

    Now if I can just instill in these young guys doing the prep work, that it needs to be done throughly. I did the balconey areas out front with a good hand brush and small wire brush, and that took me the better part of a day, with LOTS of scrubbing.
    Can one use a power washer to do the prepwork on concrete?

  23. #23
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    of course, although you may find that lots of cracks become a lot bigger and will need filling

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