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  1. #1
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    About foundation and supports...

    In the hypothetical scenario as shown what should be the maximum distance between the reinforced concrete supports (keeping in mind that what might fill up teh empty space may not be load bearing), and, how thick should the concrete pad for the foundation be?

    I'm thinking the columns would be .3x.3 m, the maximum distance between columns would be 3 m, and, the thickness of the concrete base would be about .3m.

    Correct?


  2. #2
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    I believe that is a chair? couple of cms of hardcore should be enough for your average chair

  3. #3
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    man with no head's Avatar
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    That's a big f'ing chair

    Last time I was there I measured the dimensions of my wife's family's house. The lower floor's walls and supports are block and mortar (not solid cores like newer ones would use) while the upper floor is wood. In that case the support columns are about 3m apart. I couldn't determine the pad thickness.

    I'm planning on a two story with .15m thick outer walls and .125m thick inner walls separating the rooms. The upper floor will also be about .3m thick.
    Last edited by man with no head; 17-09-2006 at 09:12 PM.

  4. #4
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    Dougal's Avatar
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    All the drawings we have had done so far use columns on pads.

    .2*.2 seems standard for columns with a max of 4m-6m between column centres.

    Pad size depends on who draws and what is considered to be the optimum depth to reach firm ground.

    Expect pads to be a minimum of 1m * 1m with a minimum depth of 1m and thickness .3 and a possible further .1 of leanmix under that.

    Plus some rebar of course.

    I'll take it you are not building in a swamp or somewhere that needs piles.
    Lord, deliver us from e-mail.

  5. #5
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    Definately not a swamp.

    After the pads for the supports are laid and poured is the complete foundation then poured as a single slab or are the supports for the walls poured and the remaining filled in once the walls are up?

  6. #6
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    Dougal's Avatar
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    What you need is a few piccies.

    http://teakdoor.com/construction-in-...shophouse.html

    The method of construction for a bungalow is pretty much the same - except they stop before the second floor.

    Note that depending on how high your floor is raised above ground level the designer may you let you infill with compacted sand and pour concrete direct onto that. Above a certain height you will be expected to use pre-cast concrete plates as a base for the poured concrete - look at the pictures of how the floor for the second floor has been made in the thread above.

  7. #7
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    Here's what I'm working on:


  8. #8
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    ^ Looks a bit 'bottom heavy' to me.

  9. #9
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    Well, here's the problem: I basically have 15 square meters of workable land to deal with due to the odd shape:



    The hen house is moving when contruction starts.



    My plan is to use the second floor 'patio' as a place for social gathering, planting flowers/vegetables in pots, etc.

  10. #10
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    My first thoughts would be that the ground floor under the flat roof is going to be like an oven unless you have air con on all the time. Not only will you gain heat from the flat roof but also with no roof overhang the sidewalls get no shade.

    Of course it is easy to criticise other peoples work

  11. #11
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    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
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    I understand what you are trying to do, but I would probably move the front upstairs wall forward a couple of meters, as the space is better inside than out imo - that patio is just too big.

    Also, your AV room has a small wall hiding the entrance/door. I think you will regret having that there as it wastes space and will have a detrimental effect on the sound from that speaker.

    But, I'm just being picky.

  12. #12
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    man with no head's Avatar
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    Good comments, that's why I'm getting started long before construction will begin

    The purpose for the wall going into the AV room would be to provide support for the roof in that area as well as channeling the audio more towards the back wall where the sofa is located. I'm not fully satisfied on that part so it may change. Maybe it won't really work that way, but, in that spot was a column supporting the roof so I figured might as well make it a wall instead of having a free standing column there.

    With regards to the front area getting hot, yeah, it probably will be that way until some trees grow tall enough to provide some shade. I am planning on a double wall design (or perhaps use regular block construction) to provide for some insulation. Pretty much the living areas will be air conditioned. My current patio is about half the width from front to back and it's fairly crowded. I'm hoping to make something in the New Orleans style which is making use of rooftop space for planting, drinking, and dining. I'm losing most of the land to put the house on so the patio becomes a sort of sanctuary.

    As it is I'm just in initial planning right now. I've already modified the bottom several times because the location of the stairs was a major PITA. Plus I'm hoping to group all the toilets/showers together to make plumbing simpler since the septic tanks will be in the back left area of the yard.

  13. #13
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    Why not move the roof patio to the rear of the property and create a small balcony on the front.

  14. #14
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    Well, the view from the front is better and due to proper design regarding feng shui it would cause a door and a window to line up poorly.

  15. #15
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    Agree with you regarding the view as to the feng shui I cannot comment as I know Naff all on this subject.

  16. #16
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    man with no head's Avatar
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    Feng shui is a complicated subject, but, much of it is common sense. For example, if you have a desk or a chair it's considered bad to have your back towards the door or a window...better if your back is against a wall. Bad luck to have a window and/or a door whether another one is in line with it...the belief being that your luck will literally go in one way and out the next. It's a bad idea to have a toilet near your kitchen...akin to eating with your ass. Energy should flow through your house and not stagnate in places.

    Plus I want to sit on my ass at night on my patio, drink a beer, and watch people go by on the road beneath

    I do hope to have some of you over in the future and having the patio all in one place makes that easier.

  17. #17
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    What are the dimensions of the patio? 20' by 30'? For whatever portion is not underneath the extended roof (depicted in the overhead drawing) build a framework for a canvas or awning. Add some 30" high flower beds which run the length of the patio on each side. Put two large potted trees at each end of the patio to provide shade.


    How much cooling would a corrugated fiberglass roof over the patio provide? It would be an inexpensive way to go.
    Last edited by attaboy; 19-09-2006 at 07:37 AM.

  18. #18
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    I'd extend the roof to cover the second floor patio, no one ever sits out in direct sunlight, well unless they are "tan" obsesed tourists. It will help to keep your ground floor cool as well

  19. #19
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    RC is absolutely right. How many times have you seen people build exposed decks like this that never get used because it's just too hot to sit out in the sun. Shade it somehow. You'll actually use it. And, as RC also points out, it will keep the house cooler.

  20. #20
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    Good points. Let me show you a few things that weren't in the image I posted: the mockup on the left would be the overhang on part of the patio to provide shade to about 1/2 of it, and, as soon as the main house contruction was done I'd have some trees planted on the south side (there's one already there that won't be moved). The one on the left also represents my original design.


  21. #21
    Somewhere Travelling
    man with no head's Avatar
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    I think I've found a happy compromise: split the patio into two sections, one up and one down. Same space but now it prevents a section of the house from getting too exposed to the sun, yet, still gives me the same floor space for plants, a beer garden, etc.


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