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  1. #1
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    Teak Wood House construction question?

    Hi, chaps have decided to put a house on the land and one thought was wondering what people thought this plan (shown below) would cost if the wood was brought from a government wood pile and milled? (I know this comes from a company that make them but that is exactly the reason for asking)



    I'm not in Thailand so cant find out, i know its unlikely someone will know but hey why not ask?

    The posts for the uprights would be 2.5 m to the floor posts to provide space in between for lounging. Cheers chaps!
    im hot its so hot today.......milk was a bad choice!

  2. #2
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    In Chiangmai and the "North" many Thais are building houses that are quite different from the traditional Thai-style houses. Some disigns that are "modern", progressive, the owner might find the first floor uncomfortably warm, and the second floor like a furnace during the hot season. The traditional Thai house is quite different in design to the western-style houses now being built in Thailand. The design of the traditional Thai-style house is compatible with the climate and available resources of the country. The traditional northern Thai house was a beautifully constructed work in which a rural nature was built into the shape the design, into each room and doorway.
    The main part of the house is composed of two adjacent rectangular units or twin houses on a raised platform with a common floor, forming a single large room entered by two doors. Outside the main room is a covered verandah (toen) and a walk-way or terrace which leads to the kitchen and adjacent functional balcony.
    The old houses of northern Thailand were built on sturdy log posts above the ground. These posts were so significant that even today with new houses built some people have teak logs posted into the ground even though the new house itself is not of teak. Under each ridgepole inside the roofs of the twin houses there are two wooden beams (khua yaan, the "bridge of fear") While their placement is to make the roof easy to repair, there are there are those who feel they may have a symbolic significance as well. The house and the thirty-six octagonal pillars upon which it stands are of solid hewn teak (Tectona grandis) while unglazed burnt clay tiles have been used for the roof. No nails, glass or natural stone have been employed. The joints are fashioned from wood and held in place with a peg-like arrangement.
    The side of the house slant outward from the elevated floor to the lower edge of the peaked roof. The roof beams at the front and the rear of the house extend beyond the ridgepole to from a V-shaped design called a Galae, "glancing crows," by the Thai Yuan people of Lanna, now Northern Thailand, and gaelae, "glancing pigeons," by the Thai Yuan of Rajchaburi. Although the real meaning of this design has not been fully ascertained, it is thought that it represents a pair of buffalo horns rather than birds.
    Moreover, the lintels, haam yon, above the doorways to the inner room of Northern Thai houses symbolize the genitals of the buffalo. The doorway is important in homes throughout Asia, but in the traditional northern Thai home the lintel is perhaps the most auspicious part of the entire house. It houses the spirits that protect the home and it wards off danger and evil that is potentially damaging to the family residing within. This was such a powerful belief in the past that a family moving into a house once occupied by another family would beat the lintel incessantly to drive out any spirits that might not be friendly to the new family. The lintel is the carved design that is placed over doorways in northern Thai houses. It is most often carved in teak but other woods are possible.
    An important part of this structure is the Toen. The Toen is a large porch or veranda which was traditionally used as a living area and a sleeping area for male members of the family. In the hot season some of the other family members also slept on the Toen because it was cooler than inside the house. The Toen was also where the women of the family did their weaving and embroidery, and where all spent a lot of time and where visitors also spent their time. This verandah is constructed on the same level as the inner room and at a slightly higher elevation than the adjoining terrace or walk way. Meals are taken and guests are entertained. anyone sleeping on the verandah automatically has his head at a higher level than the feet of an individual walking about on the terrace. While the unmarried daughters sleep in the inner room with their parents, the sons sleep on the verandah so they can be free to come and go. Male guests sleep on the verandah as well.
















    I like this description, no nails or glass.

  3. #3
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    Just some pics to pass the fact its 5am!

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    http://www.trophomes.com/Vol4_4/44-51Lanna.pdf

    This has got some nice pics too......

    basically the question reiterated is the top,top plan could the wood be brought from government source and then milled?

    Has anyone had experience and could throw a cost at it?

    cheers

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    Why do you want to use new wood? Do you think it will be cheaper or are you planning to build your house in a few years time? Because when you cut new wood you have to leave it for a long time for before you can use it or it will warp. We used new wood on the floor of our house and after 6 months the floor boards had warped leaving a 2-3mm gap between each. I would recommend buying reclaimed wood from a lumber merchant or buy a few old local teak houses and combine them into your house.

    To save money have you thought about using shera (SHERA :: ศูนย์รวมงานก่อสร้าง, รับเหมาก่อสร้าง, วัสดุก่อสร้าง, สถาปนิก, วิศวกร [Powered by Makewebeasy.com]) for the walls instead of teak it's become a very popular alternative to teak over the years and doesn't require the up keep like teak.

    For our house for 12 reclaimed support beams, 120 sq meter floor boards and all the supporting beams all teak cost us around 120k four years ago but I believe the price of teak has gone up substantially since then.

    I like your design and look forward to your construction report and photos on teak door. The only thing I would say is the back of the house where the bedroom, kitchen and storeroom are is going to be very skinny I would make the width of that 3.5m also to give you decent sized rooms.

  6. #6
    Dan
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    There was a bog standard wooden house (not fancy pants central-style steep roof) on offer for 300,000 recently in our village - the bank was going to nick it as the poor bastards couldn't repay their loan. I'm not sure how big it was - maybe 80 m2 (but that's pretty much a complete guess) and I'm not sure how much the price was inflated, if at all, by my presence but the wood - to my untrained eye - looked in good nick.

    What happened to cob?

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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    basically the question reiterated is the top,top plan could the wood be brought from government source and then milled? Has anyone had experience and could throw a cost at it?
    yes, we have bought wood from the government (confiscated teak logs) and milled it

    it is OK but, of course, expensive. It is a lot cheaper doing it that way than buying teak from woodyards

    as said before, the cheapest way is to buy an old teak house, or teak from reclamation yards

    the actual price is impossible to calculate
    I have reported your post

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ciaphas View Post
    Why do you want to use new wood? Do you think it will be cheaper or are you planning to build your house in a few years time? Because when you cut new wood you have to leave it for a long time for before you can use it or it will warp. We used new wood on the floor of our house and after 6 months the floor boards had warped leaving a 2-3mm gap between each. I would recommend buying reclaimed wood from a lumber merchant or buy a few old local teak houses and combine them into your house.

    To save money have you thought about using shera (SHERA :: ศูนย์รวมงานก่อสร้าง, รับเหมาก่อสร้าง, วัสดุก่อสร้าง, สถาปนิก, วิศวกร [Powered by Makewebeasy.com]) for the walls instead of teak it's become a very popular alternative to teak over the years and doesn't require the up keep like teak.

    For our house for 12 reclaimed support beams, 120 sq meter floor boards and all the supporting beams all teak cost us around 120k four years ago but I believe the price of teak has gone up substantially since then.

    I like your design and look forward to your construction report and photos on teak door. The only thing I would say is the back of the house where the bedroom, kitchen and storeroom are is going to be very skinny I would make the width of that 3.5m also to give you decent sized rooms.

    Thanks really useful practical information it seems that asm design is more traditional anyway there seems no reason to make it more complicated by milling brand new wood!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    There was a bog standard wooden house (not fancy pants central-style steep roof) on offer for 300,000 recently in our village - the bank was going to nick it as the poor bastards couldn't repay their loan. I'm not sure how big it was - maybe 80 m2 (but that's pretty much a complete guess) and I'm not sure how much the price was inflated, if at all, by my presence but the wood - to my untrained eye - looked in good nick.

    What happened to cob?
    I think you're right about wood houses buying them old, in one way its a sensitive issue with the buyer who tend be more elderly, but when you consider that banks might take it there really is no problem. It would be really nice to see a re surge in wood buildings or at least a scheme to protect them....anyway i lament!

    COB - thats so last year, no seriously i have looked at every possible material under scrutiny taken a lot of bashing's from various people on this forum, and read report after book after every piece of literature and i was still stumped!!!

    I found one person building in cob on an island somewhere, a great monolithic round hut slab of cob, it seems ok for guest houses etc but for permanent residential. I'm not so sure?

    How are your finds coming along with the bricks?

    I still would love to have a combo of wood and cob infill to make my replica tudor manor house which with the correct roof should be ideal, but finding the wood to fit this specific is another barmy wild goose chase in my opinion.

    I know, I know i make things twice as hard for myself........ cheers for your comments!

  10. #10
    Dan
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    I made a little 4 x 3 abode hut last year, which worked out OK.

    I've just finished making bricks for the main house (3000 all told). Having a bit of time off for Songkran but will start on foundations next week, I think.

    I can't see any reason why cob would be worse than any other material. It's all in the design. I know lots of the cob (and adobe) places which are made here are very rough and ready but if that's not what you like, there's no reason to stick with it. And it would be an awful lot cheaper than chasing down a house-load of teak.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    basically the question reiterated is the top,top plan could the wood be brought from government source and then milled? Has anyone had experience and could throw a cost at it?
    yes, we have bought wood from the government (confiscated teak logs) and milled it

    it is OK but, of course, expensive. It is a lot cheaper doing it that way than buying teak from woodyards

    as said before, the cheapest way is to buy an old teak house, or teak from reclamation yards

    the actual price is impossible to calculate
    Hey Dr.A,

    I really like your new build in town, consequently have you seen the new Euro log cabin guesthouse just out on the main road from your place? Very interesting indeed, stayed there and it was surprisingly cool...... me and the wife needed to be next to our favorite eatery PHO Viang Chang.....ahhhh Asian food i lament a second time!

    Anyway, back to business, The house plan you see is from a company that has been mentioned on this site and is based in Chiangmai. I believe that they get their Golden Teakwood from Phrae, i have no idea whether its a dismantled old house or newly milled wood!?!?!

    But this model has a price tag of 1.9 million badt which includes everything apart from furniture, so siting, erection, windows, plumbing electrics, etc etc, and other models in the range seem to represent very good value for money in my opinion to add to make a nice complex of buildings at later stages.

    I think the consensus is to buy old and clearly this make sense for functionality and price. But are there still houses out there and how does the wood scrub up to maybe buying something more complete like above?

    Many thanks DR. for your continued advice!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    I made a little 4 x 3 abode hut last year, which worked out OK.

    I've just finished making bricks for the main house (3000 all told). Having a bit of time off for Songkran but will start on foundations next week, I think.

    I can't see any reason why cob would be worse than any other material. It's all in the design. I know lots of the cob (and adobe) places which are made here are very rough and ready but if that's not what you like, there's no reason to stick with it. And it would be an awful lot cheaper than chasing down a house-load of teak.
    Time off sounds good.........

    Yeah i think you're right, please dont think im knocking COb, I really wanted to try to make something with it. My wife likes the English cottages look, with cob and thatch and that was the reason for the threads previous,( more so because we live in Devon and are surrounded by them).

    I myself like tudor halls and manors, (strange for a 26 yr old, i know) but wood and cob infill or brick for that matter makes my knees go funny. I really like brickwork too and there is a lot of this in northern Thailand in the Temples etc. Plus i really like quirky brick builds like Kilns and Chimneys they have a really nice sculptural quality and eccentricity about them which is pleasing to the eyes. I would really like to mock some up as and when we start to build on the land, but we shall see?

    Rammed earth still has the benefit in my eyes if, as and when machines come in to make it more relevant for both beauty and structural integrity. Even just for bits here and there as one side structural walls or places of interest, i know there have been some tests done in Thailand by Singapore scientists and they had very good results.

    Anyway off track.... again.

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    Traditional lanna teakhouse with 30 octagonal posts

    description sorry about where post comes from:

    Teak-Lover Let's look at this house, what makes this one the best to buy?
    • Traditional Lanna style but it's not easy to find out the house like this
    • Twin gable roof with terra-cotta tiles since 1957.
    • Two steps of teak floor, deck and corridor
    • Nice & long floor board
    • Joist, collar beam, and purlin in teak
    • Big teak wall plank with 15 inch (special one)
    • House size 6X12 meters with 30 rare octagonal teak post
    • Door and window in traditional panel designed
    • You won’t believe your eyes that price 790,000 Baht for real old teak
    • Demolition & removal FREE OF CHARGE

    Now to me 790,000 seems expensive but its not out in the sticks, and some middle man is trying to sell it. but what about woold quality the floor looks like red wood and outside teak that needs some work, what about everyone else?









    cheers for the help chaps, i think im probably siding with the company i mentioned, or if i manage to get on the trail once back, hunting down some wood houses yeee haaaw.

    Can anyone tell me what would be the usual routine for most of the wood: ie re sawing, milling, sanding, priming etc etc?????

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    69,000 bht + 60,000 to dismantle, transport and rebuild.




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    Alright Alright there's no need to show off.........

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    The company for the plan at top, have a breakdown of payment under contract, that worries me slightly, as explained below;

    This will have to be done in pounds and approximated for my ease.

    40,000 pounds complete, which break down like so

    10,000 upon completing contract.
    8,000 when foundations are ready.
    8,000 when structure is ready.
    6,000 when roof tiles are ready (at site)
    4,000 house transported to site
    4,000 when home is finished.

    Now I understand that the process is different to building from scratch with concrete and there are more intervals, but this seems heavily in the favour of the company to pay out 3/4s of the money, and then expect them to build something and finish to a high standard, with less than a quarter overall left be payed? Now I might be swayed towards buying the houses especially as JANDA kindly waved his super cheap bundle of joy in front of me!!!!!!

    Is this right or should i be concerned?????? many thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    Can anyone tell me what would be the usual routine for most of the wood: ie re sawing, milling, sanding, priming etc etc?????
    you buy an old house, like your example (that seems a little expensive if not all good quality teak), usually from an agent who will oversee the deconstruction and delivery to your land. He will make sure all the paperwork is in order and any bribes are paid. You will pay him on delivery, not before.

    the wood is then planed before use and that makes it look as good as, if not better than, new

    if teak, the best thing to do is just oil it; a couple of coats then maybe another one a year later on exposed areas

    you can see my wood house building on my thread

    http://teakdoor.com/building-in-thai...icefields.html (DrAndys Wooden Cottage in the ricefields)

    that may answer some of your questions

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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    I really like your new build in town, consequently have you seen the new Euro log cabin guesthouse just out on the main road from your place?
    thanks, and no, I haven't seen it, sounds nice
    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    But are there still houses out there and how does the wood scrub up to maybe buying something more complete like above?
    there are lots of wood houses for sale, the better ones being up in the hills

    you can find them by asking around and maybe finding a local agent

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    The Midget says we'd be looking at around 40k for an old wooden house around here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    I really like your new build in town, consequently have you seen the new Euro log cabin guesthouse just out on the main road from your place?
    thanks, and no, I haven't seen it, sounds nice
    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    But are there still houses out there and how does the wood scrub up to maybe buying something more complete like above?
    there are lots of wood houses for sale, the better ones being up in the hills

    you can find them by asking around and maybe finding a local agent

    Yes very nice Lodge cabins, apparently 500,000 badt per unit with each unit containing 1 room 5 x 5 m and ensuite(seems expensive but then the land cost 20 million badt.

    Could i ask a rough area of where you found yours? If you dont want to be so specific a general area to set me on my merry way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    The Midget says we'd be looking at around 40k for an old wooden house around here.
    Would that be for a small dwelling.....

    What denomination are we talking about? Cause that would make a big difference!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    The Midget says we'd be looking at around 40k for an old wooden house around here.
    Sounds about right, depending on the size of course.

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    When out neighbour/friend agreed to have a look at the one above we were pleased.

    He'd spent most of his life building such houses but is now long time retired.

    Anyway, apparently he spent an entire afternoon counting the planks, measuring the lengths etc.

    He then told Joy that he thought it was a fair deal.

    My point being that it was the quantity of good timber rather than the house itself that decided the price.

    He also factored in the resale value of the tin roof, discarded certain bits of wood as unusable, and took into account the concrete posts which we'll use.

    Most methodical. Glad he's on our side. Well, Joys side anyway.

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    See to be fair, in and around Chinagmai a regular size 2 bed house costs from 250,000 upto 700,000 depending on location(ie more closer to city more expensive), so that ive seen so far anyway. There arent a lot of houses ive seen to match a bigger house which this is, plus i would like to add a rice barn and other, for work related annexes (artist type stuff) at later date.

    it seems smaller dwellings are many but slightly bigger 3 beds with terrace arent (in my limited look across the whole of Chiangmai county).

    In this scenario as long as i has said plans, and matched a house based on pillar numbers and general structure i could mesh two houses into 1???

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk
    i could mesh two houses into 1???
    That's what we're doing.

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