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  1. #1
    Member Isee's Avatar
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    Retaining Wall to hold back flood water

    Iíve done a search and came across a couple of threads dealing with retaining walls but unfortunately nothing that I read fits within the circumstances of my query. But in reading the other threads it seems that there are a few knowledgeable people about who could provide some input.


    Have a piece of land on the edge of the moo baan that borders the rice fields. The intention is to raise the land but maintain a slight descending slope towards the rice fields. The retaining wall would be at the rear of the land (bordering the rice fields). The slope is to ensure any water from rain etc doesnít pool on the land and also follows the natural fall of the land. The size of the land is 200 talang wah and is the shape of a (fat) rectangle with the short ends forming the front and rear of the property.


    The first problem is that the rice fields behind the property is prone to flooding during the rainy season and water will come up and over the edge of the property. If I donít put a wall up to hold the raised land, then I think I will have problem with dirt shifting into the immediate rice paddy which will be a constant source of nuisance. Normally as I understand retaining walls, any wall over 1 metre should have weep holes to let water out but with the flooding in mind, wonít I have a problem with water coming in? I donít want the rear of the property getting soggy as I plan to construct some cow sheds there. The soil in the area is clay based. The wall height I estimate will be about 1.5 metres.

    The second problem (sort of) is that the rear boundary has some thick bamboo growing which while I want to keep, I will have to hack about half of it out to allow the wall to be constructed. Iíve presumed (correct me if Iím wrong here) that bamboo roots donít pose a problem with such walls.

    Given the circumstances, Iím looking for advice as to the correct materials to be used for the wall. Any advice would be welcomed. Let me know if any further info is required. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
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    Pics would help clarify the situation.

  3. #3
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    This type of stone and cement wall would work.



    If it isn't under a lot of pressure than breeze blocks laid on there sides is the cheapest way , ie bottom left of the picture..

    Last edited by dirtydog; 29-03-2009 at 09:51 PM.

  4. #4
    Member Isee's Avatar
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    Ok here's some pics of the back of the land pretty much as I described (from each side).









    Water will come past the bamboo when it really gets wet. Funny thing, first time I went there was some major flooding and I thought they bordered a river which had breached its banks (the contrast on my next visit was interesting). So plan is to build wall and backfill it. Looking at the pics myself, maybe it will only be a metre high will have to measure it when I'm back there in a couple of weeks. I'm going to get someone who knows what they are doing (as in, NOT the local wack some bricks and concrete together brigade) and just getting ideas here so I've got some idea when they tell me what they propose to do. I think the real trick will be proper foundations.


    DD - yeah I was thinking that it would be built from reinforced blocks. Putting the blocks on their sides would give horizontal strength as opposed to vertical wouldn't it? I suppose that would be an issue based on height. I'm no builder, hence my enquires.

    This picture is looking out over the adjoining rice fields. This will be covered in water with enough rain and the canoes come out.





    If anyone can provide some suggestion, lunch is on me


  5. #5
    lom
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    I'll give you one advice based on my own mistake:

    Avoid sloping land, better to let all of your land soak up the water during heavy rain than collecting it at the end of the land.
    There it will create a lake, softening the soil which will slip out under your retaining wall.
    Weep holes will help to get rid of the water but you'll find that stones get stuck in them and after a while there are no longer any functioning weep holes.

    You will need a very strong retaining wall to cope with the pressure of all the mud you're gonna get there if you have the land sloping.
    May the bridges I burn light my way

  6. #6
    Member Isee's Avatar
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    Thanks lom,

    I hear what you are saying, I couldn't level it completely as it will be too high to the surrounding land and wouldn't look right. With weep holes, as I understand it you need to put mesh over the holes and use pebbles, ag pipe and sand to ensure best drainage. The problem in this case is what it lets out, it will let in. I'm thinking the bamboo would soak up a bit of the moisture. I was thinking I could dig a drainage ditch across the land to exit to the side of the wall. I could probably then use it also as an over flow trench for waste water - something I would consider to fix a problem.

    Another solution and I'm completely thinking outside the square here is to have drainage holes that I could open and close when needed - like screwing a cover on them. The obvious problem with that is they would be closed during the "wet season" and hence would they serve a purpose other then operating when the water recedes. The other option is to keep the wall under metre and I should be fine.

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