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  1. #1
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    termite terror......solutions?

    When building a new house, and in such an area as Chiangmai where termites are abundant does anybody have practical (non chemical) techniques to keeping the buggers away (or at least at bay)?

    I have read a lot of information in regards to baiting, preventative methods of the house itself, but wanted to know if anyone has had practical experience when actually building?

    I am thinking of building the foundation with a insulating material the depth of the stem wall could be anywhere up to 90cm and so needs filling(if i can get an insulating material that stops the termites im onto a winner)!

    Im thinking along the lines of getting flashing, or aggregate that termites cannot borough through, and maybe a cap or mesh to make sure the buggers wont take hold of my house, can anyone advise?

    I understand water inlets like plumbing can also be a problem as well as crawl spaces, again does anybody have info on the practical remedies of keeping the house standing?

    The stem wall will be built with durox blocks filled in as specified above (unless otherwise mentioned) with a rubble trench foundation that has its own drainage.

    cheers for any possible light on this confusing issue?
    im hot its so hot today.......milk was a bad choice!

  2. #2
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    Few months....the toads/frogs come along.

  3. #3
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    Use concrete that is well sealed (no cracks) up to a certain height, make all areas where termites could possibly build tunnels visible, so you can knock them away.

    You will see a lot of Thais have concrete rendering on the lower part of the house and timber on the upper.

    The sand trench idea I've heard, problem is eventually roots enter the sand, which makes it bond allow the buggers to make their tunnels.

    I'm also interested in the flying ones and have read very little discussion on them.

  4. #4
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    Are you saying that frogs actively eat termites?

    smithson - Not using mixed concrete, but Instead durox blocks on the stem wall (this is the only concrete being used) with an outer/internal shell of natural rock. When you mean well sealed you mean the mortar and block????

    Inside the stem wall cavity (because the depth is so large) i need to fill in with a material that insulates( and i was also thinking stops termites). I was thinking of a cellulose material treated in borate as an interesting and cheap method, but also maybe mixed aggregate or a rammed soil mix to dense to bourough?

    Also combining this with a mesh barrier made out of metal or other material as a wall plate. I think i will be using layers of compacted earth as the ground floor with a sand barrier and then a stone tile or cermaic, can anyone see a any problems with this?

    Indeed, flying termites are also a great problem, i think the only wood i will have would only be in the roof and i will be using teak hardwood that i suppose will be treated with a solution, however as you mentioned there is little in reference to this critter so anyone with experience is most welcome to comment!!!!!!!

  5. #5
    I am in Jail

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    Agree with above, keep a least 75mm gap between top of ground slab and garden or outside paving. If you want ouside paving to be at the same height install mesh, same around any pipes going through your slab. Any crack in slab, seal with flexable cement grout.

    Termite Control, Pest Control, Termite Protection - Termimesh
    Termites
    Keeping Termites at Bay
    Lift your feet!

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    ^ Thanks for the links, still nothing there on the flying ones, but some good info.

    Ben, what I mean by sealed is no cracks or anything similar that termites can use to gain entrance to your place.

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    ^ Thanks for the links, from what I've read there are two types, subterranean and flying. The flying ones travel as male and female, looking for hollows in wood to start a colony. When the colony has eaten all the available timber in the hollow, they will fly out on mass.

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    The flying termite can live as multiple colonies at the same time, in the same area. The male and female start making nymphs when there wings drop off and mate, nymphs numbers can increase to thousands within a short period!

    Seems very dangerous to be making anything out of wood, i suppose regular checks and maintainence are key as well as good preventative methods when building and of course understanding when it comes to tackling these house killers!

    On that note does anyone have any other advice or practical knowledge, specific illustrations they can share?

    Thanks to all the above:

    smithson - I understood your meaning by sealed and that implies no cracks, however i was wondering if you could explain further as to me being a bit stupid im unsure of where and what cracks might develop in a building for these buggers to attack? thanks again!

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    http://www.beyondpesticides.org/alte...%20Control.pdf

    Here is a pdf that simply highlights and instructs on a non chemical control of termites, i found it quite helpful!

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    ....this should be fun. Wait 'til the rains.

  12. #12
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    Are you posting for the most banal award, the most obtuse? some more information please ^

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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk View Post
    smithson - I understood your meaning by sealed and that implies no cracks, however i was wondering if you could explain further as to me being a bit stupid im unsure of where and what cracks might develop in a building for these buggers to attack? thanks again!
    I mean no cracks in brickwork, rendering etc. to allow them access.

    Regarding the flying ones, important that if there are any hollow spaces in your timberwork, they must be very well sealed.

  14. #14
    Dan
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    From what I've read, termites can gain access through cracks over 1mm wide, which is why I'm going to cap my stem wall with a metal barrier. As Smithson says, at least then the earth tubes are visible and can easily be destroyed. I've also put in a French drain in a - probably futile - attempt to reduce ground moisture. I've also read about silica dust as a preventative; apparently, it is too abrasive for the termites.

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    How in layman's terms, would you describe a stem wall? then I can relate it back to what I would call it!

    Thanks

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    We had an exterminating company put in PVC around the inner perimeter of all downstairs rooms floors. There are outlets around the house in which every 3 years they pump insecticide. Has worked well so far.

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    Use teak wood only, then the termites will not bother you

    In Aussie, I have been told they put a mesh barrier into the concrete base slab, which stops any termites gaining access if there are cracks developed later

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Use teak wood only, then the termites will not bother you
    Yes, but the teak needs to be 50+ years old, otherwise they'll eat it. I've been told they don't eat coconut palm timber as it's too hard (can't be nailed into once dry) and have considered building a house using the timber as posts.

    I think one of the best solutions is the traditional style houses on stilts. Underneath becomes a pleasant shaded area and it's very easy to see if the buggers if the start making their way upstairs.

  19. #19
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    not true Smithson, they will only eat the very outside part under the bark

    it has nothing to do with age. more to with the toxic sap teak has

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    not true Smithson, they will only eat the very outside part under the bark

    it has nothing to do with age. more to with the toxic sap teak has
    What I've read is that teak only produces the toxic sap after it's 50 years old. Apparently this is why second hand teak can be more than the new stuff, because the old houses were built from aged teak and the fact that it has no signs of termite damage after decades proves it's safe.

    However, I'm no expert, it's just something I've read several times on the net.

  21. #21
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    as far as i know.termites &ants nests produce individuals with sex and wings
    for essaiming(?) reroduction and genes mixing ,all at the same time so some can escape the predators;they mates,the males dies and the females fly away to found new colonies;the old nest stay alive,ready for the next batch.
    pest control:try 1 fluorescent tube,some hanging plastic &water buckets i.e.
    drown them and have a good protein rich breakfast(or a gift for neighbors!)
    sorry,i lose my HARRAPS dictionary
    paul

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    DAD

    Termites Need Acces To Water So Must Always Have Enclosed Passage To Earth As Protection From Light, Hence Tunnls & Cracks.

    Hope This Helps..

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    Blimey, it is about time Termites went to school

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    We had an infestation in the kitchen about two years ago. The kitchen units were built on a brick frame but with a plywood base. Unfortunately the builder had not concreted in the space underneath, which was bare earth, so that is how they got in. They ate the plywood, plus the softwood skirting boards in the room, but did not attack the hardwood doors, shelves and frames of the units. Not did they get into other rooms with hard wood skirting boards or attack the hardwood room doors or stairs. We seem to have cured the problem and no termites have been spotted since. We filled in the space under the units with concrete, topped that with tiles as the internal base and replaced the skirting boards. All wood was treated with anti-termite solution. The small sprays we bought at first did not seem to work. All the wood we took out went straight onto a bonfire, complete with the termite nest.

  25. #25
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    so cruel

    and yes, they love all that board, it seems perfect for them

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