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  1. #1
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    forreachingme's Avatar
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    Electrical main breaker cabinet equipment

    Looking for a shop selling electrical cabinet with breakers, bus bars and Amp. meters and volt meters, all built in cabinet...

    This is probably something to be custom made, but if anybody came across a shop in Bangkok selling this stuff fully fitted, input of location would be nice to have a look at the different pricing...


    Is there a special street in Bangkok full of this stuff ?


    Or anyone did it with a subcontractor for a good price and nice quality ?...

  2. #2
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    how many kV ?

    are you building an MCC for a mine ?

    or just 415 v for a workshop ?

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    380V for a workshop...

    Main breaker around 400 A .

    With subbreakers 200 A / 160 / 100 A. a few...

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    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    ok - you will build it with off the shelf bits no worries

    panel with the 3 phase ELCB breaker and 3 copper busbars running down the middle and earth and neutral bar in the bottom.

    then just add the 3 phase and single phase breaker as you wish and plug the spaces with covers

    are you looking in Bangkok ? I can ask an electrical contractor tomorrow.

    this is a pic of a trendy one but only with single phase subcircuits
    http://www.mahoneyelectrical.co.uk/u...002-732520.jpg

    will also have a look later through my pics for something a bit more realistic for here

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by forreachingme View Post
    380V for a workshop...

    Main breaker around 400 A .

    With subbreakers 200 A / 160 / 100 A. a few...
    Most "off the shelf" load centres will not handle any more than 250 Amps (at 20kA for 1 second). What you describe will need to be designed & built by an engineer...not an electrical contractor.

    The below questions need to be answered before your switchboard can be designed;

    1] What is the prospective fault current of the supply to the switchboard?
    2] In what environment will the switchboard be located?
    3] What kind of loads will be used?

    The switchboard should be designed to IEC 439-1 to ensure safety & longevity.
    Oh for fucks sake! Get a life & stop trying to fuck mine up!

  6. #6
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    This is the one i have to replace...

    A bit bigger then the one on the link above... Easy to find for 220V but 380V main cabinet is what i need...
    This one had 630A main, and then 2 x 400 A / 2 x 250 A / 2 x 160 A and a few more, yes with copper bars inside - a neutral and separate ground.

    This one was made with quality material from ABB and Fuji...

    Just seen a report " envoye special" on TV 5 about copies from China, bloddy cheap stuff they do, copies and not working, overload and the brakers goes on fire ! Scary ! Difficult to see if it is real stuff a first glance, they look good but just not reliable.

    I'm looking for somthing similar, just a bit smaller will do...

    There is a fair in BITEC - Machinery Mart 2008 - 9 to 12 October, will try my luck over there, should have a few suppliers

  7. #7
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    My comments in yellow.

    Quote Originally Posted by forreachingme View Post

    This is the one i have to replace...
    Why does it need to be replaced?

    A bit bigger then the one on the link above... Easy to find for 220V but 380V main cabinet is what i need...
    This one had 630A main, and then 2 x 400 A / 2 x 250 A / 2 x 160 A and a few more, yes with copper bars inside - a neutral and separate ground.

    This one was made with quality material from ABB and Fuji...

    Just seen a report " envoye special" on TV 5 about copies from China, bloddy cheap stuff they do, copies and not working, overload and the brakers goes on fire ! Scary ! Difficult to see if it is real stuff a first glance, they look good but just not reliable.

    I'm looking for somthing similar, just a bit smaller will do...
    Unfortunately, "a bit smaller" may not be an option.
    The Distribution Board you currently have, should have been designed & built (& probably was) according to;

    1] the location (country). This is necessary as different countries have different ambient temperatures, which will affect the size of the cabinet (heat dissipation) & therefore the ratings of the switchgear (circuit breakers etc). Also, altitude plays a part in this. I'll assume that your switchboard lives in an altitude of less than 1000 metres above sea level.

    2] the location of the Distribution Board within a building or structure - again, this is about temperature, atmosphere (degree of pollution &/or moisture) & if the location is considered "hazardous" or not (IP ratings & other "protection/safety" ratings).

    3] Switchgear ratings - all switchgear (in your case, circuit breakers) have ratings that pertain to voltage, current carrying capacity at certain voltages, current carrying capacity at certain temperatures, Short Time Fault Current ratings (Short time Withstand), Prospective Fault current ratings & Time/Current trip ratings (usually represented by curves or graphs). Time Current trip ratings are particularly important if the loads on your switchgear are inductive. A good engineer will use these curves to provide the smallest rating/size of switchgear
    (cost savings) without creating an instance of "nuisance tripping". The minimum size of your switchgear will determine the size of downstream cables protected by the switchgear. Cable costs money.

    4] Discrimination - if the switchgear is not properly selected, a small "fault" on a piece of equipment (e.g. a motor) may trip the main circuit breaker, effectively shutting down your whole installation when in actual fact, the circuit breaker that protects the cables supplying the motor should be the only breaker that trips. This can be avoided by properly "discriminating" between upstream & downstream circuit breakers. This can only be done with the use of Fault Current curves (provided by the circuit breaker manufacturer).

    5] Circuit breaker Cascading - similar to above except that properly "cascaded" circuit breakers will limit the Fault Current to load equipment, thus protecting the equipment against unnecessary damage. Again, this can only be done in accordance to a switchgear manufacturers' instructions.

    6] Prospective Fault Current of the supply (to the switchboard) - the location & mechanical support of supply cables &/or busbars within a switchboard is determined by the Prospective Fault Current. If not supported correctly, expect a possible "explosive" result. Magnetic forces created by high fault currents are tremendously powerful.

    7] Incoming cables (supply cables) - there needs to be enough space within the cabinet to appropriately connect the supply cables to busbars or circuit breakers without exceeding the minimum required cable bend radius (cable manufacturer specified).

    8] Busbars - busbars MUST be properly interconnected to other busbars or equipment. This is done with the use of special bolts & washers, specifically designed for busbars. These bolts must then be tightened using a tension wrench. A failure to observe this will most certainly lead to "hot joints" & possibly fire or premature equipment failure.

    There is a fair in BITEC - Machinery Mart 2008 - 9 to 12 October, will try my luck over there, should have a few suppliers
    You indicate that your main breaker is 630 Amp. This size breaker tells me that the Prospective Fault Current of your incoming supply is at least 25kA (twenty five thousand amps) & quite possibly higher. Such high fault currents can cause an explosion (a very large one) if the switchboard is not designed correctly. As a comparison, residential electrical supplies usually have a Prospective Fault Current of less than 5kA (five thousand amps). Consequently, I would suggest you not attempt to do any of this yourself.
    Also, the switchboard MUST be designed to IEC 439-1 (minimum).


    Below is a link to a switchboard manufacturer in Thailand. I have no idea if this manufacturer is reputable or not.

    http://www.smdswitchboard.com/index.php?language=

    As you can see, switchboard design & manufacture is not simple. Should you choose to buy a "cheap" switchboard, you risk damaging or destroying any expensive capital equipment connected to the switchboard, not to mention possible injury/death.
    Last edited by mikehunt; 10-10-2008 at 12:47 AM.

  8. #8
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    ^ Thanks Mikehunt !

    I need to replace it coz i move and the one in pics remains where it is, i will downsize production, as i subcontract more and concentrate on assembly and finishing...

    Looks like this was the link i was looking for !

    And thanks for input too

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