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  1. #1
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    Glass blocks and shower partitions

    Now shower partitions start from those plastic hanging sheets that go green and slimey within a month upto really nice stuff.

    Glass blocks are the nicest things to use in a bathroom I reckon for partitioning and letting light in, they cost from 65baht each.

    to build a shower partition out of glass blocks is actually quite a slow job, this is due to their lack of absorbencey, so the cement takes a long time to go off, also you need a beam all the way round it to strengthen it as they dont stick aswell as bricks.


  2. #2
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  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Here's a pic of a jacuzzi we done, the partition is made from safety glass and we had it made up just outside of BKK, the first thing we had to do was a ply wood shape for the stainless steel trim that holds it in place, once the trim is made this was then fitted and we recut the ply wood form to the size we needed for the glass, also showing which edges needed rounding off, this actually works out a lot cheaper than the shower cubicules that are on sale here in Thailand.

    This bathroom floor is raised by 40 cms so that stepping into the jacuzzi is easier, obviously on this job the cost didnt matter, but doing that adds nearly 2,000baht per sq met to the floor.


  5. #5
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    While we are on bathrooms I suppose I should mention the importance of twin sinks, and yes they are important, his and hers sinks, I mean you come home pissed and need a shave, the answer is you use her sink, she's gonna nag you anyway so you might aswell, then you get up in the morning and use your own sink, yep no hairs in that one, while her sink is full of last nights shavings.


  6. #6
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    Of course for us poor ppl something like this would be more than adequate.


  7. #7
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    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
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    Why would you come home pissed and want a shave?

  8. #8
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    To get rid of the smell of perfume from your checks perhaps....or if you aint shaved in a few days to get rid of the smell of pussy on your face...

  9. #9
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    Here's a nice pic of me toilet, the glass blocks face east, this aint really such a good idea when you have a hangover, as you really don't want all that light first thing in the morning.


  10. #10
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    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
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    I suppose you use those cheap hollow blocks that explode if you have a fire....?

  11. #11
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    Are there any other sort

  12. #12
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    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
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    Yes, the ones that meet UK building regs!

    Of course, if the customer is a Merkin....

  13. #13
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    Fabian's Avatar
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    Glass blocks look so 70s.

    Sorry, seems like I have nothing but criticism on your building threads today.
    Maybe I will be better if you answer my insulation question.

  14. #14
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    I think glass blocks can look good if you avoid the fussy styles. They look great as part of an exterior bath room partition because they provide privacy yet let in
    natural light.
    Good stuff DD.

  15. #15
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    I have used glass blocks and correct, if you keep them fairly plain they look ok as well as letting in light to the deepest, darkest most forbidden nooks and crannies!

    The only thing I have found that if you grout between the blocks with white spak filler quite often the grout will turn green because of the dampness.

    Anyone know how to avoid this occurrance?

  16. #16
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    use cement, not grout

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    to build a shower partition out of glass blocks is actually quite a slow job, this is due to their lack of absorbencey, so the cement takes a long time to go off, also you need a beam all the way round it to strengthen it as they dont stick aswell as bricks.
    I have seen silicon used to stick them together

    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy
    The only thing I have found that if you grout between the blocks with white spak filler quite often the grout will turn green because of the dampness.
    use silicon grout or fungi resistant grout

  18. #18
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    a concrete mix like portland cement works best. grout is for filling tile spaces after
    setting in place. after use a joint waterproof sealer.

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  20. #20
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    and a suggestion

    Do I have to caulk the mortar joints if I'm using glass block in a shower wall or high moisture area?

    After you have completed the installation, struck the joints smooth, and waited a week or two, coat the mortar joints with some type of clear acrylic or silicone type sealer for mold and mildew protection.

  21. #21
    Member globin's Avatar
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    Me thinks I must add something to this subject as I have made the mistake of believing that the local tilers or bricklayers are experts at laying these blocks. Shite, I forgot to impress y'all with a photo of the mess they made..next time maybe...disasters are some thing I like to forget but it is fun to review the f[at]#kups years later.

    First some don't:

    !. sloppy layout, unlike bricks cannot be fixed up with cutting or what ever magic the locals come up with. So measure, level, align with care
    2. white cement all by itself is NOT the mortar to use.
    3. rusty old rebar is not the preferred reinforcing (bamboo is preferable to rust).

    The do's so far:

    1. Mortar mix: 1 part white cement, 1/2 part lime, 4 parts sand (preferable white (ish)).
    2, dry stiff mix with a very little plasticizer (dish washing detergent will do)
    3. spacers like the ends of square chopsticks or something bigger to keep the joints true and even
    4. use 4mm suspended ceiling rods or other for horizontal reinforcement, preferably two pieces running 3/4" (20mm) in from the edge.
    5. when set scrape or rake the joints out and use a good quality colored anti fungal/bacterial grout to flush up the joints.

    Some have said you need a border to add structural strength, we will try to acheive this with long porcelain tile or granite slices cut to width, and stuck on the edges with aluminum edges and non porous type tile adhesive....will test this in the coming week.
    ~Glennerd~

  22. #22
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    Your using way too much sand, this aint England, also for laying the blocks just use sand and cement, point it out then grout it.

  23. #23
    Member globin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog View Post
    Your using way too much sand, this aint England, also for laying the blocks just use sand and cement, point it out then grout it.
    DD, can you put a number beside "way too much"? What does England have to do with sand?
    My research says anything from 2 1/2 to 4 sand per 1 cement and almost always 1/2 portion of lime, if any.
    I've done just about everything in building but I have never touched a glass block, but seen plenty of crap installation jobs ( and one more last night, that I was up past my bedtime demolishing before the friggin' white cement set)

    cheers

  24. #24
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    2 to 1 is more than enough, if you use too much when you grout the sand pulls out and mixes with the grout making the grout look crap.

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    I quite like those glass blocks, as long as they're done right. Been thinking about putting them in our guest bathroom - currently there's just a plain, tiled, partition/wall there and I reckon some well-placed glass blocks would instantly improve it.

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