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Thread: The Pool

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    The Pool

    Here is the before and after shots of our pool just finished...



    and after....



    10m x 3m x 1.5m.

    Already been christened and bombed in from the second level.

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    look nice, what are the four posts sticking up in the pool in the first pic?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nawty View Post
    Here is the before and after shots of our pool just finished...



    and after....



    10m x 3m x 1.5m.

    Already been christened and bombed in from the second level.
    Looks a nice job Nawty, congratulations!

    Just one question> The wooden flooring that you have adjacent to the pool and the sliding doors> Is that the composite/ moulded wood substitute flooring or solid wood tongue and groove boards.
    If it is the composite moulded shit forget about it being anywhere near water. The shit lifts and swells the minute it comes in contact with moisture. Had to drag all of my flooring up and the pricks at Boontahvorn ignored my plea for replacement materials

    10 metres, great swimmers pool Certainly will keep you fit.

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    Looking Good Nawty... U did well at utilizing and maximizing the available space.

    You have a brand name and color for the tile used?

    Sand or cartridge type filter?

    Did you go with a salt water chlorination system?

    Do I see correctly that the far end from the house has some type of retainer blocks in place? Is this to restrict children from getting in the deeper water or is it a spa area?
    "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff....and it is all small stuff"

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    The 4 posts you see are actually 6, 2 more down this end. They are the pilings still yet to be cut off at correct height when they have dug down deep enough.

    The wood floor is solid wood, tongue and groove and 'Makah' in my opinion it is the nicest wood around second only to teak. I will put up some more pics of the entire house as soon as fully complete, still some touchups to do and the pool shot was minimal like that cos still had scaffolding on the deck area.

    Yes the block is small and tight, only 100 sq wah and the house is 430 sqm plus we have a garden area on the opposite side of the house from the pool of around 60/70 sqm, so making use of the entire area was important and still get some garden behind it rather than just a blank wall.

    The system is salt water, we have an automated chlorinator management system which is working wonders at the moment, it has been running for 3 weeks and if continues to work as it is now, then it is an amazing system.

    Its a sand filter with DiamondKleen crushed silicone-dioxide crystals which are 30 times more performant than traditional filter sand, so they say.

    yes at the far end is a .8m wading area for kids made from concrete and tiled and topped with a black granite stone. One problem is the surface of the stone is more slippery than I thought it would be and probably need to roughen it up a little, don't know how yet now that it is in place. The gaps between the verticals are enough to make a chilkd think about it, but also they can squeeze through and needed to be large enough to allow good water flow also. Luckily my 6yo can swim well and 3yo daughter is now very close to going alone, she can swim from edge to edge, but not tread water yet.

    I will post a pic I took for my future referance of the tiles, factory direct even. The only problem with this tile is as it is a glass top, it is hard to cut with a nice edge conventionaly, the workers stuffed up so many tiles that I had to go and find a way to get a nice smooth surface myself and then show them it can be done.

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    these tiles are not cheap, they were at least double what I had originally budgeted for, but they were very nice and worth it in the end.


    here is the barrier you asked about...

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    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Nawty,

    Very nice. Can I be rude and ask how much it all was? We're thinking of getting one as well, probably smiliar size.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Nawty,

    Very nice. Can I be rude and ask how much it all was? We're thinking of getting one as well, probably smiliar size.

    Not rude, everyone wants to know the costs of pools here, especially if thinking to do one.

    I have not totalled up all the costs yet, but the budget was around 400k including the cheaper tile we were going to use, we ended up spending around 100k on the tiles alone.

    So a rough guestimate is around 450k to 500k.

    Now considering we had quotes from pool companies and the cheapest was 850k and the most expensive was 1.2 million, we did rather well.

    One farang company which was the quote for most expensive, quoted me 75k for the pool shed for the pumphouse and we aleady had 2 walls built for it on the boundary fence....stooopid fuckers.

    I should put that quote up for all to see, but not sure on policy for naming and shaming stoooopid fuckers on here....I have several

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    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    So a rough guestimate is around 450k to 500k.
    Righto, cheers. Pretty reasonable as these things go.

    Your experience (and quotes) seems to tally with what others I know went through when putting pool in.

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    Thumbs up

    'Nawtycal N nice'!
    Great Nawty. I hope to install a pool in the near future; your data re tile, sand filter, salt water and auto chlorination system (name?) is good to know. Thanks...

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    The chlorinator is 'surechlor 4000'

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nawty View Post
    The system is salt water, we have an automated chlorinator management system which is working wonders at the moment, it has been running for 3 weeks and if continues to work as it is now, then it is an amazing system.

    Its a sand filter with DiamondKleen crushed silicone-dioxide crystals which are 30 times more performant than traditional filter sand, so they say.

    .
    It looks nicely designed, but I would want a pool without chlorine, if possible, and also fresh water would be better

    why did you choose salt water Nawty?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Nawty View Post
    The system is salt water, we have an automated chlorinator management system which is working wonders at the moment, it has been running for 3 weeks and if continues to work as it is now, then it is an amazing system.

    Its a sand filter with DiamondKleen crushed silicone-dioxide crystals which are 30 times more performant than traditional filter sand, so they say.

    .
    It looks nicely designed, but I would want a pool without chlorine, if possible, and also fresh water would be better

    why did you choose salt water Nawty?
    Is there any such thing as a fresh water pool without chlorine?

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    There is and my next pool will have it, it is a system using UV light I believe, cannot think of name right now, will go find it. But at the time I was told it was not so good, but I would definitely like to be fresh water only.

    The saltwater pool is the next best thing, tastes better and is not nearly as hard on the skin and eyes.

    We have been swimming in it and come out with a small smell of chlorine, but that will go as the system settles in and the chlorine levels are reduced to suit the system.

    The auto system runs at 100% chlorine production for first setup, then you can slowly reduce it to settle somewhere between 60 and 90% for all time.

    I will surely research freshwater pools for next time and there is also an 'eco' pool which I would like to do, but you need a larger area for it to be successfull.

    Just had a look, freshwater pools are ionization and ozone treatments.

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    Nice pool.

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    You said you had some quotes but didn't use them, I take it you were your own contractor, did you research the makings of the pool, and hire laborers to do the work, if so where did you find people qualified for pool construction

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    And yes a very nice pool

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    Appreciate all the pool insight provided and the answering of questions Khun Nawty. I also have a salt water chlorination system being installed in my pool and from all that I have read and comments from people who have such a system, it is a big money saver and is considerably more plesant than not having this type of system.

    Good job on the pool.

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    I no unnerstan

    You have a salt water pool and still need chlorination

    so why not have a freshwater system?

    and the non-chlorine systems are ionisation, but I think they are very expensive to install.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    I no unnerstan

    You have a salt water pool and still need chlorination

    so why not have a freshwater system?

    and the non-chlorine systems are ionisation, but I think they are very expensive to install.
    Khun Dr,

    As you probably understand and know full well, the water put into the pool is in fact fresh water (not salt water) but there is a conversion system piece of equipment (shape is somewhat tubular and approximate size is 40 cm long and 15 cm in circumfrence) that converts table salt that is placed in the pool water into chlorine as it passes through the system. It is a lot less expensive than purchasing chlorine to put directly into the pool and is a lot less harsh on the skin and eyes. Here is an excerpt from a web page:

    Benefits of Salt Water Pools

    Salt water pools used to be the exception, but now they are becoming a widely accepted method of water treatment in swimming pools. A lot of builders are now making salt water systems standard on their new pools. Most equipment manufacturers have also become aware of the fact that salt water pools are not just a passing fad. They are here to stay.
    Why have salt water pools become so popular?
    In this author's opinion, most people who consider themselves "sensitive" or "allergic" to chlorine are not reacting to the chlorine at all. What is creating a problem is packaged pool chemicals and the additives and carriers in those chemicals. Those same swimmers who claim allergic reactions to chlorine, typically experience no problems when they are in a salt water pool. The answer isn't the absence of chlorine. Salt systems create their own chlorine. The answer is the absence of all the packaged chemicals and by-products in those chemicals.
    What is the cost benefit of a salt water pool?
    Most people do not buy a salt water pool system for the sole purpose of saving money. They buy it for the increased swimmer comfort. With that said, they do save quite a bit of money on pool chemicals, but it probably takes about 2-3 years before the system pays for itself.
    Here is the best rationale for buying a salt water system: People spend $25,000 and up to build a beautiful pool, so doesn't it just make sense to spend about $1000 on the water quality. After all, shouldn't the best thing about the pool be the water? In the end, you get what you pay for. A little money spent on the salt water system will allow the typical homeowner to enjoy their swimming experience so much more.
    What is the down side to a salt water pool?
    The only real problem we have seen is the fact that it does change the way you do your water chemistry and people are sometimes slow to adapt. It is very important to follow directions carefully with regard to water chemistry. Some pool owners have experienced problems trying to keep the pH down, but in our experience it is simply a matter of keeping up with the water chemistry and not letting the pH get too high before trying to adjust it. Overall, the water chemistry does get easier, but there is a small learning curve.
    Salt Water Pool System FAQ's

    Is this like swimming in the ocean?
    No, the ocean has about 20,000 parts per million (ppm) of salt in the water, while a saltwater pool has only about 3000 parts per million salt. At 3000 ppm, you generally cannot even taste the salt. Any water under 6000 ppm is still considered fresh water. Your eye contains about 9000 ppm salt.
    Is the pool water still blue?
    Yes, since the salt water system creates chlorine, the water is still blue and also very clear. A salt system gives your pool the best water quality you have ever seen.
    Can I install it with my existing pool equipment?
    Yes, since the water is still considered fresh water, it is compatible with all standard pool equipment (pumps, filters, heaters, poolsweeps, etc.) If you have a stainless steel filter, check with the manufacturer. To our knowledge, the newer Pentair Nautilus Stainless Steel filters are the only ones not compatible with salt systems.
    Does this soften the pool water?
    Yes, and this is another benefit of the salt system. Many pool owners appreciate the soft feel of the water.
    Where does the salt go?
    We add granulated salt (looks a lot like table salt, but without any additives) to the pool according to manufacturers instructions. Most manufacturers recommend pouring it into the deep end of the pool, but read your directions carefully. The salt quickly dissolves in the pool water.
    Will I save money?
    The fact that you are not having to use packaged pool chlorine will save a significant amount of money in the long run. The REAL REASON to go with a saltwater pool system is because of the fantastic water quality. The money savings is just icing on the cake

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    Dont think the ionization system was that expensive, certainly well worth it anyway if it saves on chlorine and health etc.

    The confusion re the salt/chlorine issue is that the chlorinator pumps the water after the filter through an 'electrolytic' cell, I believe it is a metal (dunno what kind of metal, maybe alloy, lloks like alloy) that is electricaly charged. When we started the system up, we emptied 4 large bags of salt into the pool, this salt passes the chlorinator and turns to chlorine, but for whatever reason it is better, milder than the chlorine you all know that is thrown into a normal chlorine pool.

    The result is the water is softer, it does not have a chlorine smell and it does not sting the eyes etc, the pool tastes salty a little bit, not like seawater at all. It is much better than chlorine traditional pools.

    I hope the next system of just freshwater is even better.

    RP65....my house contractor built the pool, we bought the materials

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    Nawty,

    You may not have a clear idea just yet with it being new and all, but any guesstimates on the 'running costs' of it all?

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    not yet, should have a good idea on next months elect bill but as it is the only thing really running and the difference between the last and this should be a good indication.

    Salt apparently only needs to be added 3 times a year or so and that not expensive. Even with that, the automated system tells you when you need to add it.

    I doubt it will cost much over and above the electricity as it runs 8 hours per day.

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    Nawty I can't fully see the finished job from the photos but is it completely enclosed or outside ? If not has anyone any idea of cost to put in an aluminium framed structure to go over a pool this size ?

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    outside.

    Are you serious, if so let me know and I can ask my aluminium gal as I think she coming tomorrow, at least for a rough guestimate. Tell me what you want exactly, roof material etc.

    and whereabouts ?

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