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  1. #1
    Member More Volts Igor's Avatar
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    Steel roofs, cost compared with tile

    This question has been asked on another Thai forum, since I too am interested, and this site seems to have far better reports regarding construction, I'll ask it here

    Our love-nest (retirement home) is to have Ayutthaya (central Thai) style dual-slope roofs, the architect has drawn these using tile.

    I was wondering about using steel roof panels similar to Colorbond COLORBONDĀ® steel with a spray-on insulation/sound deadening layer. We ought to be able to use a lighter structure because the material is lighter.

    Anyone actually used this system in Thailand? Is it cheaper than tile? Comments?
    EDIT To add quote tags.

  2. #2
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    Will work out about 25 percent cheaper if they have spray on foam insulation there.

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    There is a company producing long run metal insulated roof panel.
    Searched but can't find it, I have a brochure somewhere here, will have a look today.
    As mentioned in the OP the other consideration is that long run roofing is much lighter than tiles so less structure required to support.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterpan
    There is a company producing long run metal insulated roof panel.
    How long? Cut to fit?

    The longest I found was only 4m. I want 20m.

  5. #5
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    Labor would also be cheaper for a steel roof. About the insulation, how effective is the sound deadening? This seems to be the biggest draw back to steel roofs.

    What is the price per meter of colorbond here?

  6. #6
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    I was wondering about using steel roof panels similar to Colorbond COLORBONDĀ® steel with a spray-on insulation/sound deadening layer.
    I was at Arcitect 08 and there was a couple of roofing booths with pre insulated steel panels, just instal no spraying necassary. Sorry as I was not looking for roofing I didn't get a brochure.

    There was also a booth selling plastic artificial grass roofing if that is your thing

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithson View Post
    Labor would also be cheaper for a steel roof. About the insulation, how effective is the sound deadening? This seems to be the biggest draw back to steel roofs.

    What is the price per meter of colorbond here?
    We removed that steel roof on the patio after the first weeks in the rainy season! Was like the sound of hundreds of little drummers when the rains were strong!

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    I was told that even if you used steel, the building dept requires the structure be strong enough to support tiles. Has anyone heard of this?
    '
    Sounds strange to me, but then it seems so many buildings here have too much structural support.

  9. #9
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    No, you misunderstood what was told to you in the translation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Smithson
    the building dept requires the structure be strong enough to support tiles.

  10. #10
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    Thailand

    They have a factory in Rayong.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    The longest I found was only 4m. I want 20m.
    Who is going to set up a factory and allow 20 meters run off space from the press machine, How will they transport these sheets? How much damage will be done to them as they are lifted onto the roof? How many people would it take to get it up onto the roof? Not due to the weight but due to how flexible it is and long and how easily damaged it would be.

  12. #12
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    20 meters seems excessive. I think you can get 8 meter lengths.

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    Thailand Expat Texpat's Avatar
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    Why not just glue 4 of them together?

    Something about a steel roof in Thailand that makes me say ... no.

    With the high humidity, torrential downpours, frequent lightening, blazing sunshine and other factors, I'd stick with tile (ceramic).

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog View Post
    No, you misunderstood what was told to you in the translation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Smithson
    the building dept requires the structure be strong enough to support tiles.
    Actually it was a farang who told me, but I thought it was BS.

  15. #15
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    Then he misunderstood what was told to him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Why not just glue 4 of them together?

    Something about a steel roof in Thailand that makes me say ... no.

    With the high humidity, torrential downpours, frequent lightening, blazing sunshine and other factors, I'd stick with tile (ceramic).
    Same climate here in Oz. Lots of them around here and have been for many decades. In fact where I live up here on Cape York just 12 degrees south of the equator (and a cyclone prone area), ALL the roofs are colour bond. Cheapest, strongest and lowest maintenance. Most of the northern hemisphere experts who have never lived in a house with a colorbond roof will try to tell you that metal roofs are hot and noisy in the rain. But modern insulation puts them right on par with a properly insulated tiled roof for both temperature control and noise in rain. AND, besides being stronger and nil maintenance, its a hell of a lot cheaper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Why not just glue 4 of them together?

    Something about a steel roof in Thailand that makes me say ... no.

    With the high humidity, torrential downpours, frequent lightening, blazing sunshine and other factors, I'd stick with tile (ceramic).
    Tiles store heat to be released at night. They require more support, often meaning more concrete columns, which also store heat. There has been a lot of research done in Australia on the use of iron sheets in the tropics.

    Tiled roofs are favored by thieves.

    Colorbond is the way to go, cheaper and better. The only issue is the noise, but I'm sure this can be dealt with.

    In Australia we could order sheeting to fit the lengths of the roof, which means no cutting and no overlaps (the area most likely to corrode).

    The largest we ever did was 10m sheets for a factory. There was only 2 of us, dangerous work.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Why not just glue 4 of them together?

    Something about a steel roof in Thailand that makes me say ... no.

    With the high humidity, torrential downpours, frequent lightening, blazing sunshine and other factors, I'd stick with tile (ceramic).
    Not for me Tex, Long run coated steel every time.
    The house I posted a photo of in the "buying a new house thread" Was built 30 yrs ago using long run formed sections. I talked with and had a walk around with the current owner last year and its stood up well.
    Not a problem with it, absolutely no sign of corrosion.
    That was built in an even tougher environment than here, as it has to stand all the environmental rigors that you have mentioned plus salt spray and high wind speeds.
    It was built adjacent to a Ocean Marina.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithson View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Why not just glue 4 of them together?

    Something about a steel roof in Thailand that makes me say ... no.

    With the high humidity, torrential downpours, frequent lightening, blazing sunshine and other factors, I'd stick with tile (ceramic).
    Tiles store heat to be released at night. They require more support, often meaning more concrete columns, which also store heat. There has been a lot of research done in Australia on the use of iron sheets in the tropics.

    Tiled roofs are favored by thieves.

    Colorbond is the way to go, cheaper and better. The only issue is the noise, but I'm sure this can be dealt with.

    In Australia we could order sheeting to fit the lengths of the roof, which means no cutting and no overlaps (the area most likely to corrode).

    The largest we ever did was 10m sheets for a factory. There was only 2 of us, dangerous work.
    Mate, my house is a low pitched colourbond roof celled on the rake. So its only a few inches between the ceiling and the actual roof sheets. Its insulated with fiberglass and reflective foil. One of my big complaints is that I cant hear the sound of rain on the roof. So I have to go outside to the uninsulated patio to hear that lovely sound.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithson
    The largest we ever did was 10m sheets for a factory. There was only 2 of us, dangerous work.
    In the UK they have the metal (usually zinc plated tin) on a roll and form it on site, so you can have any length you want.

  21. #21
    Member More Volts Igor's Avatar
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    All good stuff chaps

    Looks like BlueScope Lysaght have exactly what we're looking for, Smartruss (sounds like an athletic support) with Colorbond cladding BlueScope Lysaght Thailand

    Panda, is your roof insulated with a spray on job or seperate stuff on a roll (has to be a technical term, brain is not operating)?

  22. #22
    Thailand Expat Texpat's Avatar
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    Personal preference, mates.

    I wouldn't/didn't put a metal roof on my shed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by More Volts Igor View Post
    All good stuff chaps

    Looks like BlueScope Lysaght have exactly what we're looking for, Smartruss (sounds like an athletic support) with Colorbond cladding BlueScope Lysaght Thailand

    Panda, is your roof insulated with a spray on job or separate stuff on a roll (has to be a technical term, brain is not operating)?
    Not spray on. Just the normal fiberglass stuff attached to a reflective foil.
    Wouldnt hurt to do both if the cost permits. And I would go for the thickest insulating matting in the first place rather than wishing you had later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Personal preference, mates.

    I wouldn't/didn't put a metal roof on my shed.
    What's wrong with tin sheds? I was quoted 19B per meter for corrugated iron the other day, even if it's the cheapest stuff around, sound really cheap.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    Personal preference, mates.

    I wouldn't/didn't put a metal roof on my shed.
    More like personal prejudice. There's some big debates on some other boards re tiles verses metal roofs. Lots of technical data posted re heat transfer to the house. But without exception the knockers of metal roofs are all from the northern hemisphere and have never lived in a house with a metal roof.

    I think its more of a cultural thing as high pitched tiled roofs have always been the traditional style in the cooler climate western countries. AND also in Thailand. Even the old grass roofs in Thailand need a high pitch to make them water tight.
    Tin roofs are seen by many in northern hemisphere countries and indeed Thailand as the poor mans substitute for a "proper " tiled roof. I recall one European gent stating that tin roofs were only suitable for commercial sheds and not homes.

    Yea its personal preference, but not based on any logical argument apart from
    the fact that most northern hemisphere people haven't had anything to do with tin roofs and prefer to stick with what they know and are comfortable with. And the same goes for Thais I have been told as houses with tin roofs are reportedly harder to sell and bring a lower price compared with the inferior tiled roofed places. I guess this ignorance and prejudice will continue for a while yet until people finally catch on.

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