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  1. #1
    Dean
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    Window glazing in LOS?

    I have never seen any windows in LOS with glazing, just wood or plastic trim. Having just finished the builing of my vacation/fishing home, I need to remove the wood trim on the two bathroom windows. In putting in the wood trim, the contractor cracked one of the panes and in cutting the glass, he cut it too short in one instance and in the other, the glass barely covers the frame. He glued in the wood trim with my Gorrella (sp) glue and did a shitty job there. The glass is too loose. I am going to the U.S. Tuesday for two weeks and am planning on bringing back a can of window glazing and some window push points and re-doing the window. Can I find glazing in Thailand and will the glazing hold up to the heat and humidity of LOS?

  2. #2
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    What is glazing? What are window push points?

  3. #3
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    Glazing is the pane of glass, isn't it?

    Maybe he means doing glazing using putty and beading?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    Glazing is the pane of glass, isn't it?
    Thats what I thought, Thailand has tonnes of glass in every town, why would he bring back panes of glass from America?

  5. #5
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    I think he means putty.

    Glazing Push Points
    Use to hold glass in picture frames or windows prior to applying putty (Glazing Compound). Zinc coated. Push easily into place with putty knife.
    Painter's tools, sealants, caulk, home repair tools - Red Devil, Inc.

  6. #6
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    You just use small pieces of wood to balance the glass before you put the trim or putty in, hell, you can even use dogends, it aint rocket science.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean
    The glass is too loose.
    Very common fault in Thailand. Had it in every house I have lived in.
    When the wind blows or a door is shut all the glazing rattles.

    I go round with a hot glue gun and 'fix' all the rattling ones.

  9. #9
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    Assuming that what you're after is putty, I've never seen any for sale here nor have I ever seen a glazing job done here that used it although that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
    However, rather than going to all the trouble of bringing some back from the States why don't you consider reglazing the windows using new glass cut to the correct dimensions (aperture size minus 4 mm in each direction ) New harwood glazing bead cut to size and some brown silicone. Run a a bead of the silicone (plenty available from somewhere like Homepro, CementThai or Global) round the inside of the opening and then use 2 small sections of hardwood the thickness of the glass to lift the pane off the bottom of the rebate so that it is central in the aperture. Once you've done that run some more silicone into the channel between the edge of the glass and the frame aperture and then another bead on the glass for the glazing bead to bed against. Tack the beading into place just to hold it temporarily and then leave it for a little while for the silicone to begin to cure before finally driving the pins holding the beading into place. Clean any excess of silicone off the window and when it finally cures the glazing job should be perfect although you may have to do a bit of sanding to get the edge of the beading flush with the frame since the silicone will have pushed t out a bit.
    All you've got to do now it hope that unlike 99% of Thai windows they don't warp or become impossible to open or close.

  10. #10
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    They sell glazing putty here but I have never seen it used.
    I agree with what rtwo said.


    Big-Ben Paint Co.,Ltd.

  11. #11
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    ^Ermm, I think you will find that that is car body filler, doubt window putty would take the sun here, it would lose the oils too quick and crack, better off with silicone hidden behind the beading so the sun don't get to it.

  12. #12
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    ^
    Hmm...I think you might be right.
    Do yanks call body filler putty ?
    But it is listed as glazing putty so where does the glazing bit come in ?

    Anyway, if it's wrong can you delete the post please

  13. #13
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    I think that the "glazing' means it is fine grained and they put it on in case there will be a low spot in the Bondo [putty] for the finish sanding.
    I have seen it used and is usually a blue color.

  14. #14
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    In the UK body filler is called putty, c14 or something like that, p45 maybe? damn sure I can't remember but it was like a letter and 2 numbers, but they are 2 completely different mixes for cars and windows, windows stuff smells nice

  15. #15
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    ^
    We always called it body filler, pudding or Isopon P38

    The glazing stuff has got Linseed oil in it
    You like that smell ?

  16. #16
    Dean
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    Sorry but I haven't logged on for two days. I used to paint in U.S. for 5 years before getting into the wood floor installation/re-finishing business. On older houses, all the windows on the outside had glazing/putty instead of wood. As it aged, it would get brittle and possibly fall out. By the time that someone would hire me to paint their house, I would have to take a stiff putty knife to remove the old glazing and replace it with new glazing. Dap, in the U.S., has the market for selling glazing at paint stores and places like Home Depot and Lowes. To replace broken windows, you would remove the glazing and metal "push points (they are metal and have one point down and a place just above the point down where you can place your putty knife to push it down into place). You would use two push points per side of window and they are small enought that a small box wouldn't take any space in my suitcase (either would a small or medium sized can of Dap glazing). I tend to bring things from the U.S. that I can't find here, like my De Walt 18 volt cordless tool set (I'm bringing back a cordless nail gun this time). When I had my teak house buiult, the person that put the glass into all the windows did use silicon and I have no problem with those. I guess that its just a difference in what you are used to. When painting, I got used to using glazing. Thanks

  17. #17
    Dean
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    No. I wasn't planing to bring back panes of glass to LOS.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean
    When painting, I got used to using glazing.
    No, you got used to using putty. Glazing is glass, even in the US.

  19. #19
    Member The_Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean View Post
    Sorry but I haven't logged on for two days. I used to paint in U.S. for 5 years before getting into the wood floor installation/re-finishing business. On older houses, all the windows on the outside had glazing/putty instead of wood. As it aged, it would get brittle and possibly fall out. By the time that someone would hire me to paint their house, I would have to take a stiff putty knife to remove the old glazing and replace it with new glazing. Dap, in the U.S., has the market for selling glazing at paint stores and places like Home Depot and Lowes. To replace broken windows, you would remove the glazing and metal "push points (they are metal and have one point down and a place just above the point down where you can place your putty knife to push it down into place). You would use two push points per side of window and they are small enought that a small box wouldn't take any space in my suitcase (either would a small or medium sized can of Dap glazing). I tend to bring things from the U.S. that I can't find here, like my De Walt 18 volt cordless tool set (I'm bringing back a cordless nail gun this time). When I had my teak house buiult, the person that put the glass into all the windows did use silicon and I have no problem with those. I guess that its just a difference in what you are used to. When painting, I got used to using glazing. Thanks
    Why do you deal with old techniques? How come you won't upgrade to a high insulation value windows (PVC)? Single pane -wood frame has very little insulation value. Show some pics of your project when you have time i'm sure you'll get a few pointers from the BM's. Save you some time and $$$.
    All people have photographic memories, the problem is most people don't have film!

  20. #20
    Dean
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    The building that I put the two windows is just a studio house, with a kitchen and bathroom. The 4 windows in the studio section are the crank open type with maybe ten glass slats on metal frames. Not exactly energy efficient but I don't plan on using an air conditioner, so it doesn't really matter. Sorry Marmite but I am in the U.S. and went to Lowes yesterday and bought the small package of "push points" and saw the Dap GLAZING material. It is actually called that. I'll post a picture of the can on this site after I get back to LOS on May 10. I guess you can't be right all the time.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean
    Dap GLAZING material
    OK, a material used for glazing. Glazing is still glass.

  22. #22
    Dean
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    You are stubborn, MD! Like I said, its GLAZING in the U.S. I found another brand, that I bought because it is in a smaller container, and it also says GLAZING. I'll post a picture of it when I return.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean
    Like I said, its GLAZING in the U.S.
    Sorry, but you're talking out of your arse.

    GLAZING

    Noun

    1. Transparent, or semitransparent, colors passed thinly over other colors, to modify the effect.

    2. The glass, glasslike, or glossy substance with which any surface is incrusted or overlaid; as, the glazing of pottery or porcelain, or of paper.

    3. The glass set, or to be set, in a sash, frame. etc.


    Verb

    1. The act or art of setting glass; the art of covering with a vitreous or glasslike substance, or of polishing or rendering glossy.


    From the Seppo Dictionary of simplified English.

  24. #24
    Dean
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    MD, first you say that its called putty and not glazing in both the U.K. and U.S. I knew that you were full of it then but waited until I got to U.S. and saw the containers with my own eyes (obviously, you haven't, at least in the U.S.). I politely corrected you and what is your response? That I'm still wrong! You finally go to the dictionary (probably from the U.K.) and say that I don't know what I'm talking about. The fact is, I can back up my claim with a picture of the product. All you say is that you know what it is called in the U.K. and, even though you have no knowledge of it, you claim that it is the same in the U.S. I somehow miss the logic in your argument and the only post that I will make further on this topic is the picture of the container, which says GLAZING!!! Enough said!

  25. #25
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    I think you will find that it is called "Glazing Putty".

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