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  1. #1
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    Teak Floor Finishing - Teak Oll?

    Had this teak floor installed.

    Told them "natural", non-glossy finishing.

    Well, there's no finishing at all.

    They only applied teak oil.

    Would you ask for the other finishing?

    As with the teak oil "drying", it's not really a maintenance-free floor.

    The floor's beautiful, but quite delicate.

  2. #2
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    ^ Aren't you supposed to wax it too?

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    Quote Originally Posted by absolutely Bangkok
    The floor's beautiful, but quite delicate.
    On boats we leave teak decks unfinished. Teak was used as decks on US aircraft carriers for years before a more durable substance replaced it. Your floor is not that delicate. it will however, stain. Now that it is oiled it may be tough to get a poly coating to stick; as Marmite pointed out a well applied coat of wax will protect it. thing is, you've got to keep it maintained.
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


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    Salt water will wash the oil out after a few applications, maybe!

  5. #5
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    oxalic acid works brings back original color too.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by absolutely Bangkok
    The floor's beautiful, but quite delicate.
    On boats we leave teak decks unfinished. Teak was used as decks on US aircraft carriers for years before a more durable substance replaced it. Your floor is not that delicate. it will however, stain. Now that it is oiled it may be tough to get a poly coating to stick; as Marmite pointed out a well applied coat of wax will protect it. thing is, you've got to keep it maintained.
    Stained, that's the key word. Got these stains.

    What wax you suggest? (Kiwi floor wax?)

    Apply manually/with towel?

    Every how many months?

  8. #8
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    I was not wearing my specs and I thought the title of thread was Teak Door Finishing - Teak Off

  9. #9
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    Teak does not need much protecting, unless you want to keep it beautiful

    Polyurethane can be used, although it is not the perfect finish. It can be applied over teak oil without problems. If you use the matt version, it looks better, and will not stain. Varnish cannot be used over oil, so make sure you use PolyU. Waxing is a lot of work, so is best avoided, esp for a floor.

    Teak oil is best and can be used as follows:

    If you follow these instructions you will have a first class finished teak product because you will have done the basic finishing that will determine the life of the item you have bought.
    • Find a well ventilated location that your item can dry in for the next 3 - 5 days. For Oil or varnish the basic process is the same.
    • Wipe all dust and contamination off the teak using mineral spirits, odorless if possible.
    • Let dry while you get the first coat ready. I am going to use teak oil for this particular application.
    • Brush on a soaking coat of teak oil on all surfaces of the teak item. Let set for ten minutes, then dry off all remaining teak oil with a soft cloth.
      Teak oil is volatile so after you finish put the cloth in a zip lock bag and seal it for use tomorrow .
      Let the teak dry for 24 hours (minimum).
    • Complete Item 4, two more times being careful to allow 24 hours drying time in between coats.
    • On the fourth coat, use the teak oil like a furniture polish. Apply a fourth and fifth coat allowing 24 hours between each.
    • When you finish, soak the fabric that has teak oil in it in water at least overnight before disposing of it properly.

    Now you have completed the hard part. From now on about every 4 to 6 months, wipe down your teak and apply a polishing coat of teak oil. In most weather conditions it will retain a smooth finish as long as the process is kept up. It is waterproof and you have completely sealed the wood, so no damage should occur.
    Varnish finishes, polyurethane etc. all are treated the same way, same coats, in some cases and environments they either last longer or not. Your call. The process is the same, except these finishes are brushed or sprayed on.
    as you can see, it is a bit of work to do it initially; labour is cheap so get someone else to do the hard part but make sure they do it properly.
    I have reported your post

  10. #10
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    Tks all - and a special cheer to DrAndy.

    Maybe I do not want to apply the teak oil torture each half a year.

    Just spoke with the contractor, they will sand the floor slightly and apply the semi-gloss PolyU.

    Should be fine then I guess - and the stains can be made disappear as well.

  11. #11
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    The SIKA company has quite a few choice on the high side of quality and price...

    Sika (Thailand) Limited | Thailand

  12. #12
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    Sika is a damn fine product and we used it on the boats all the time.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Sika is a damn fine product and we used it on the boats all the time.
    My contractor called Sika. They said they'd had only glue for wood ...

  14. #14
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    Sika in Bangkok is hopeless, when we needed it for building yachts a while back we ordered from Singapore - far quicker.

    How about some pics before and after???

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ban Saray View Post
    Sika in Bangkok is hopeless, when we needed it for building yachts a while back we ordered from Singapore - far quicker.

    How about some pics before and after???
    Deal, will be done, but not with the Sika finishing I'm afraid ...

  16. #16
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    Waxing wood floors and furniture not effective due to Thai weather

    What wax you suggest? (Kiwi floor wax?)

    I used the above as Kiwi has a great rep, but over time a white haze developed on and in the wax. I now regret the choice. For what it's worth.... Cheers

  17. #17
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    Teak Wood Flooring

    I likewiise was considering the use of Teak Wood in two of my rooms (office and master bedroom), primarily because it is retardent to termites and I like the feel of hard wood flooring on the feet. After discussing with a non-partisent individual, the recommendation for the use of "Makha Wood" rather than Teak was offered as a recommendation for consideration. I asked about it's finished looks, it's hardness, the price, and degree of distaste for by the termites and was advised that it looks real nice when finished, is as hard as Teak, is slightly cheaper than Teak, and is not liked by termites at all.

    Anyone have experience with the use of "Makha Wood" as flooring for inside the house?
    "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff....and it is all small stuff"

  18. #18
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    Makha Wood: Origin: S.E. Asia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma. Burl Wood is a hard woody hemispherical outgrowth on a tree strongly and heavily built. Makha wood is a rare hardwood, highly prized which gives an outstanding finish. The wood is hard, heavy and dense and develops a beautiful patina as it ages. The wood is finely figured and highly valued for it's attractive and luxury-class red wood. It's mainly used in furniture industry, flooring, trim and construction of fine musical instruments. It's also used in cabinetry, home building and sculpture. This beautiful timber is used for cabinet work and wood carvings, as well as for construction of bridges, house posts, etc. The tree grows in the deciduous forest.[NL][NL]Makha is considered as a large-sized tree with an average life of 200-300 years. It can reach 30 meters in height and more than a meter in diameter. The seed pulp is used in making cigarettes and the bark is used in traditional herbal health drinks. The buried wood near the base of the trunk is especially valued. An old Makha tree can measure up to almost two meters in diameter. It has a light brown or brownish pink bark. The wood is very durable, and used mainly for burly constructions, such as a post, sleeper, or structure of a sailing boat or ship, etc., or can be used as a gun's stock, part of a musical instrument, such as a drum. It has a very precious burl. Its burled grain stems from a damage to its trunk caused by an insect's bite or mould. It automatically produces the burl to rehabilitate itself. The burl normally grows out close to its root or a few meters higher up. This special grain without any conduit can be as large as one meter wide; but normally it is considerably a small piece of wood, compared to the whole tree. To get a large piece will take almost a generation. Therefore, large piece is extremely difficult to get. Due to the limited wood supply in Thailand, Makha products are normally not made in large quantities. Each piece is made by hand and hand-rubbed to enhance the beauty of its unique burled grain.

  19. #19
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    Hi There, i am building a Thai style Teak house, and am wondering what product to use for the outside and inside to seal and protect from bugs,sun etc
    Have been looking at the chaindrite varnish as it is also a bug repellent etcetc
    any ideas?
    thanks rob

  20. #20
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    I assume that at least some temples in Thailand have teak floors. If this is true, does anyone how they are finished and maintained? Through the application of teak oil, as discussed earlier in this thread? Some other kind of oil? Or, possibly, no finish at all? All of the above? None? If none of the above, then how?

  21. #21
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by absolutely Bangkok
    Would you ask for the other finishing?
    The matte (satin) finish suggested above is what I used and it really is good.

    Suggest you do a small piece first to test the "look" and make sure it adheres well to the floor.

  22. #22
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    Is Danish Oil suitable. We used it on boats and though pricey preserved it perfectly

  23. #23
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    the recommendation for the use of "Makha Wood" rather than Teak was offered as a recommendation for consideration.
    Makha is a very good teak like wood. If you decide on the Makha get the stuff from Lao. It is better than the Thai Makha but slightly more expensive.

    Another wood to consider is Mai Daeng. It is darker than Teak or Makha but very hard and resilient.

    No matter which you choose an important consideration is the quality of the tongue and groove cuts. Bad T&G will result in gaps between the boards and will have to be filled which detracts from the beauty of the floor IMO.

    Some folks like the look of the grain variance and color from board to board and some prefer a more uniform look. For a more uniform look use a light stain before you finish.

    Maybe the most important thing is to make sure you have a contractor that knows what they are doing when laying the floor. I have seen some beautiful wood really screwed up by bad installers.

    Termites and other critters is always a concern. The amount of concern depends a lot on the surface the wood flooring is being laid. If the flooring is laid on finished concrete as is common then one need to be less concerned about the bugs. If on a deck or framed floor bugs will be a problem to consider.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post

    Termites and other critters is always a concern. The amount of concern depends a lot on the surface the wood flooring is being laid. If the flooring is laid on finished concrete as is common then one need to be less concerned about the bugs. If on a deck or framed floor bugs will be a problem to consider.

    That is not a problem with teak, termites dont like it

    if you use other wood, then it should be treated before laying, especially if laid on concrete. The termites will happily work away under the wood until, one day, there is little wood left!

    anyone used the polyurethane finish here? I would be interested to hear some results for teak.

    Using Danish Oil is the same as Teak Oil, you get good protection but need to reapply every 6 months for a house to avoid any staining. It is not a difficult job, no sanding or dust etc, quite friendly on the hands too

  25. #25
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    if you use other wood, then it should be treated before laying, especially if laid on concrete.
    You are correct but only if you neglect to spray occasionally around the edges of the flooring to prevent termites from getting under the flooring.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    anyone used the polyurethane finish here?
    Not on teak but used it (matte) on Mai Daeng and very happy with the finish.

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