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Thread: Water filtering

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    Water filtering

    Ok, my new house uses a water supply from a well, then it is pumped up to a tank. There is another tank on top of that filled with ricestraw charcoal, which acts as a crude filter for any sediment

    The local soil is mainly clay, deposited over the years as floodplain from the river

    As they use quite a lot of fertiliser and weedkiller on the ricefields, what is the best way of filtering the water for house use?

    In addition, I have noticed that the water lately has a yellow colour, so that is not nice for cooking with.
    I have reported your post

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    ^ There are some carbon-filters there can be used, but I think it would be a good idea to get a lab-test on the water, to see what needs to be removed, to avoid sickness in the familie..

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    DE (Diatomaceous earth) with carbon back up for bacteria is what is most commonly used in all municipal water treatment plants. It will filter out virtually all of the more harmful and disgusting debris down to 1 micron (which is virtually everything).

    The down side is it is quite expensive, requires quite a bit of cleaning (due to it's efficiency) and most people here don't know how to maintain it properly so you would have to learn yourself..
    It is also a filter media that is a carcinogen if it is inhaled so caution is advised but it is all natural. It also has a fair amount of byproduct expelled after cleaning which presents a small issue with disposal over time..

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    that sounds more industrial in scale

    I need something for a house supply

    Thanks also Dalton, I may do that

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    I use just rain water that is stored in Thai water jars, but before it goes into the service line there is a 5 micron filter just after the pump that catches anything that could plug the washer or shower filters.
    We do not use that water for anything other than sanitary water in the kitchen sink, showers and toilets, we buy bottle water for cooking and drinking, and when you brush your teeth.
    It is safer and it damn sure worth a few baht a week.

    I would suppose that your well is not deep enough and well cased to prevent surface water from entering and all surface water is first recycled thru dry wells and cess pools before entering a bore hole to be pumped up for domestic use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    that sounds more industrial in scale

    I need something for a house supply

    Thanks also Dalton, I may do that
    Not at all, these filters are also commonly used for filtering swimming pools.. So they are sized accordingly.. It's just the principal that is used on an industrial scale..

    ^ yeah and I would suggest some sort of automatic chemical feeder (I.E. Chlorine injector) treatment of your bulk "filtered" water source, they are not too expensive or complicated but again well worth it..

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    Our water tastes good, so no chlorine please, that would be a negative approach

    Dalton had the right approach, do a water test before making any expensive commitment

    from the web

    Foul taste, smell, or color of your household water may prompt you to investigate water treatment equipment. The publicity about water pollution problems may cause you to question the safety of your water supply. Or mineral scale buildup may cause you to invest in early replacement of plumbing fixtures and water-using appliances.
    Before you attempt a quick and possibly costly or ineffective remedy, take a first important step: have your water analyzed. A water analysis will help identify bacteria, minerals, or other pollutants that are present. Interpretation of the test results will help you determine whether the water needs to be treated and, if so, the type of treatment needed. The intended use of the water (whether for drinking, laundry, or all household uses) will also help determine the extent of treatment required.

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    Who knows what sh8t could be in the water....

    What about an RO filter for drinking and cooking, then you know that its going to be as close to pure as possible - with a separate tap in the kitchen? Mybe put an -on line ceramic/charcoal filter on bathrooms etc for cleaning teeth?

    This is what my mate's place in India uses and I drink the RO water all the time without problems,. Quite an acheivement when I stop and think what might be in the water in Delhi.

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    That sounds good also Xavier

    however, reverse osmosis filters are expensive and waste a lot of water, I hear

    might be wrong though

    still need to test the water first to see if necessary

    Reverse Osmosis Water Filters
    Reverse osmosis systems are generally considered to be the most effective form of water filtration available. They are used by the military in situations where clean water isn't readily available for example. The main part of the system is a semi-permeable membrane through which the untreated water passes. Due to the pressure at which the water is under it flows in the opposite direction to that which it would in natural osmosis, hence the name 'reverse' osmosis. By passing through the membrane almost everything is removed from the water except radon, pesticides and volatile organic chemicals (VOC's). To address this most reverse osmosis systems come with an additional carbon/ceramic filter which removes these contaminants either prior to passing through the membrane or after, sometimes both. Because reverse osmosis systems are more sophisticated than other types of filter, often incorporating the other types into their design, they are significantly more expensive. However the running costs are roughly the same as for the the solid carbon/ceramic filters. Reverse osmosis systems are available that are either fitted to a single tap as with other filter types or plumbed into the main water inlet pipe, delivering filtered water throughout the house.

    Advantages: Highly effective filtration, running costs reasonable, whole house systems available.

    Disadvantages: Expensive initial cost, plumbing work required. Filtration is so comprehensive that ALL minerals are removed meaning supplements required to replace minerals with nutritional value
    Last edited by DrAndy; 30-11-2007 at 09:59 PM.

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    [quote=DrAndy;466464]Our water tastes good, so no chlorine please, that would be a negative approach

    Dalton had the right approach, do a water test before making any expensive commitment

    from the web

    Foul taste, smell, or color of your household water may prompt you to investigate water treatment equipment. The publicity about water pollution problems may cause you to question the safety of your water supply. Or mineral scale buildup may cause you to invest in early replacement of plumbing fixtures and water-using appliances.
    Before you attempt a quick and possibly costly or ineffective remedy, take a first important step: have your water analyzed. A water analysis will help identify bacteria, minerals, or other pollutants that are present. Interpretation of the test results will help you determine whether the water needs to be treated and, if so, the type of treatment needed. The intended use of the water (whether for drinking, laundry, or all household uses) will also help determine the extent of treatment required.
    Doesn't have to be chlorine, that was just one suggestion...

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    That sounds good also Xavier

    however, reverse osmosis filters are expensive and waste a lot of water, I hear

    might be wrong though

    still need to test the water first to see if necessary

    Reverse Osmosis Water Filters
    Reverse osmosis systems are generally considered to be the most effective form of water filtration available. They are used by the military in situations where clean water isn't readily available for example. The main part of the system is a semi-permeable membrane through which the untreated water passes. Due to the pressure at which the water is under it flows in the opposite direction to that which it would in natural osmosis, hence the name 'reverse' osmosis. By passing through the membrane almost everything is removed from the water except radon, pesticides and volatile organic chemicals (VOC's). To address this most reverse osmosis systems come with an additional carbon/ceramic filter which removes these contaminants either prior to passing through the membrane or after, sometimes both. Because reverse osmosis systems are more sophisticated than other types of filter, often incorporating the other types into their design, they are significantly more expensive. However the running costs are roughly the same as for the the solid carbon/ceramic filters. Reverse osmosis systems are available that are either fitted to a single tap as with other filter types or plumbed into the main water inlet pipe, delivering filtered water throughout the house.

    Advantages: Highly effective filtration, running costs reasonable, whole house systems available.

    Disadvantages: Expensive initial cost, plumbing work required. Filtration is so comprehensive that ALL minerals are removed meaning supplements required to replace minerals with nutritional value
    I agree about the plumbing, although you can buy counter top versions with a reservoir and there are some with puncture type fittings.
    There's alot of disagreemant about whether you need the minerals in water - doctors I've spoken to tell me there's more minerals in a teaspoon of vegetable soup than 5 litres of water so I wouldn't wory on that score.
    Some people reckon food tastes alot better when cooked in RO water.
    I guess alot of its propaganda - the water filter biz vs mineral water bottlers.
    RO water is much better for cleaning stuff thats for sure.

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    the only stuff I need to clean is myself! we use the well water for everything except drinking, at the moment, although I have also drunk it occasionally without any ill effect

    tastes good for tea and coffee too

    the main worry I have is agricultural chemicals, so I will get it tested

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    Dalton's water analysis recommendation sounds best, but where do you get it done?
    I used well water at all my homes in Thailand. Occasional probs during rainy or very dry seasons, but otherwise, it was great. Also used it for cooking, coffee and brushing my teeth. Think it helped build up my immune system. I now use a jug with a Brita water filter to drink Canadian city tap water, mostly because of the heavy use of chlorine. Bottled water -- I only drank Minere; the rest tasted weird.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    Dalton had the right approach, do a water test before making any expensive commitment
    Doing a water test will not guarentee your well water may not become polluted and unusable in the future. It may just prove to be okay at the initial test but things change. For me I'd go for a charcoal filtered system, which are available for domestic use. You can buy water testing kits on the Internet instead of paying someone to do it. You can then do it as and when you need to.

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    In most cities there are a department for water-supply, they can do a test there for a small fee or maybe free if you are a nice guy
    Knowing what you need to remove from the water is benefit where you decide what kind of filtration you need. But whit chemicals in the water, you might not be able to avoid chlorine, but get the water tested before jumping to conclusions.
    The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.

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    If you are using water from a well, most of the wells in Thailand have heavy metals & calcium.
    If the water that you are using leaves brown stains in the bath room.
    Then you need to filter the water, using a water softener.
    With Resin or Burm.
    The filter with Resin you have to regenerate with salt every time backwash.
    The filter with Burm regeneration is not required.
    If you would like clean water you use 1 sand filter 2 Burm filter 3 carbon or Anthrasit which is a good filter media then 4 Membrane filter which filter down to .02 micron.
    They say that you can then drink the water. I would only drink bottle water.

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    Pesticide runoff will end up in your well for sure.
    I wouldn't be confidant of even the most expensive water filter stopping the poisons getting through. Bottled water or rain water for drinking and cooking is cheap and easily available. Up to you.

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    up to me indeed!

    I will get the water tested, eventually. In the meantime, we will drink bottled water. I am sure that coffee and tea taste better with pesticide

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    ^ The human stomac are pretty tough

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    We have dwell water for general purpose and rain-water for cooking and drinking.
    The only prob so far was a dead rat in one of the tanks - gave me the shits for a few days.

    What's all the talk about micron filters?
    The solids settle on the bottom of the tank, the outlet is 2' above ground.
    Is this not enough?

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    How thick was the rat?

    Did it block the outlet or was it a bloated floater?

    (BTW, did you grill it or fry it?)

    Welcome back Stroller.

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    What's all the talk about micron filters?
    The solids settle on the bottom of the tank, the outlet is 2' above ground.
    Is this not enough?[/quote]


    Membrane filter which filter down to .02 micron.
    Micron is the size it will filter down to.
    If you look at the diameter of a strand of hair is about 10 micron then .02 micron is very fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    up to me indeed!

    I will get the water tested, eventually. In the meantime, we will drink bottled water. I am sure that coffee and tea taste better with pesticide
    Probably best to get the well water tested at regular intervals throughout the year if you have any intentions of drinking it in the future. Reason being that wells generally tap into the shallow aquifer which is simply local run off traveling slowly like an underground river over impervious clay or rock. So, if the farmers spray their crops mostly in say May, the most polluted water may not reach you until say September.

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    we are talking about the possibility of pesticides and nitrates getting into the ground water, Ratchaburi

    these can be bad for your health in the long term

    mind you, in the long term, we all tend to die

    and Panda. true but I will have to see what the first tests are like

    the soil here is mainly river clay, so is pretty impervious to drop down from the fields

    therre are weak points in it though where water can seep

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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpat View Post
    How thick was the rat?

    Did it block the outlet or was it a bloated floater?

    (BTW, did you grill it or fry it?)

    Welcome back Stroller.
    It was a sinker, at an advanced stage of decomposing when I took the initiative to inspect the tank, as my morning cuppa was tasting weirder every day and the tap water starting to smell.

    Reason the rat got in was the 'improved' design for the piping system I insisted on. Usually there are good reasons the Thais do stuff the way they do, even if they cannot explain the rational for it.

    Oh well, we live and learn...

    Anyway, collecting rain water is a feasible solution for drinking water out in the sticks, I wouldn't rely on well-water for which there are more possibilities for chemical and biological pollution.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi
    Membrane filter which filter down to .02 micron.
    Micron is the size it will filter down to.
    If you look at the diameter of a strand of hair is about 10 micron then .02 micron is very fine.
    Ah, ok, thanks.
    But what's the purpose of this? Does it filter certain 'life-forms' out or what?

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