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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    There is always a sediment whilst the water residing in the tank.


    I guess that such a fine filter will get stuck by the water impurity, will not let the water properly in. Such a fine impurity - if any - would not make any harm to the pump.

    Anyway, it's a good precaution to dissolve (once a week or so) a bit of chlorine in the tank avoiding a growth of bad bacterias whilst the water is without movement. Then, the chlorine will discover also some chemical impurity - iron and other metals - there is always some - the residues will sediment at the bottom. A sand filter (back-washable) after the pump makes always a good service. Once after some time you backwash it, you will be surprised what the filter has held back.
    Obviously it all depends on your water supply, I have been obsessing over my supplies for near on 30 years now, so excuse my pedantic s!
    ~30 micron is considered to be a very coarse filter, if your city water supply plugs this filter you are fighting a lost cause, I have two water supplies & two tanks & pumps, I have a filter only on the well water which is used for watering the garden, the water is not clean, have to clean the filter every two weeks or so, we use a lot of water on the garden. Any solids in the water will add to wear and tear on the pump.
    The house water (from the city) we have a stainless tank, the city water is good, clean it out once a year, there is very little sediment and no bacteria, I have sized it so the water doesn't sit for long not giving time for bacteria to grow.
    Last edited by Airportwo; 02-03-2018 at 12:05 PM.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    There is always a sediment whilst the water residing in the tank.


    I guess that such a fine filter will get stuck by the water impurity, will not let the water properly in. Such a fine impurity - if any - would not make any harm to the pump.

    Anyway, it's a good precaution to dissolve (once a week or so) a bit of chlorine in the tank avoiding a growth of bad bacterias whilst the water is without movement. Then, the chlorine will discover also some chemical impurity - iron and other metals - there is always some - the residues will sediment at the bottom. A sand filter (back-washable) after the pump makes always a good service. Once after some time you backwash it, you will be surprised what the filter has held back.

    1. Isn't this supposed to prevent bad bacteria? 2. If I put the filter between the city water line and the tank inlet I would assume the water will go into the tank with no problems because of filtration. Am I wrong here? The pump pumps the water from the tank to the house so it would already be filtered in the tank.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    Obviously it all depends on your water supply, I have been obsessing over my supplies for near on 30 years now, so excuse my pedantic s!
    ~30 micron is considered to be a very coarse filter, if your city water supply plugs this filter you are fighting a lost cause, I have two water supplies & two tanks & pumps, I have a filter only on the well water which is used for watering the garden, the water is not clean, have to clean the filter every two weeks or so, we use a lot of water on the garden. Any solids in the water will add to wear and tear on the pump.
    The house water (from the city) we have a stainless tank, the city water is good, clean it out once a year, there is very little sediment and no bacteria, I have sized it so the water doesn't sit for long not giving time for bacteria to grow.
    I am assuming you leave the pump for the city water /stainless tank on all the time?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark45y View Post
    I am assuming you leave the pump for the city water /stainless tank on all the time?
    Yes, the tank is filled by city water, the city water supply is not constant but the tank is big enough that it never runs dry (tempting fate!) so the water from the tank keeps the house supplied 24/7

    If you have a filter inline to filling the tank, you have to keep an eye on the filter and clean as required if there is a lot of crap it will plug the filter, that is why I would keep the filter micron size large ~30 micron, if you go for smaller size ~0.5 you would be constantly cleaning filter.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    I have a filter only on the well water which is used for watering the garden, the water is not clean, have to clean the filter every two weeks or so, we use a lot of water on the garden. Any solids in the water will add to wear and tear on the pump.
    I doubt that any commercial pump will get any damage by fine solids.

    Your well water is obviously with a strong content of iron (and other metals) as usual in Thailand. Once you run the water directly into the filter the iron oxidates to a fine rust (saanim), hence it blocks the filter, the water does not go thru.

    This can be avoided by a temporary storage of the well water, the rust will sink to the bottom within 3 - 4 days (if enhanced with chlorine and another day with alum - SaanSom - so cheap here in Thailand - it gets faster. Then you take the water 10cm above the tank bottom completely (almost) clean.

    I wrote a thread here about struggling with my very rusty well water - after different solutions according to "expert" advices finding now a simple system, feeding my 60,000 L swimming pool, house, 3 gardens.

    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    The house water (from the city) we have a stainless tank, the city water is good, clean it out once a year, there is very little sediment and no bacteria, I have sized it so the water doesn't sit for long not giving time for bacteria to grow.
    The bacterias come already with the city water system. You better would not like to see where it is coming from and how long it stay there.

    Interesting that people do not mind to treat very carefully their swimming pool with strong "healthy" chemicals - for their 10 min. swimming. And on the other hand are not concerned about their water used for cooking, washing etc...

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    I doubt that any commercial pump will get any damage by fine solids.

    My experience is obviously different to your, my experience after 40 years using Industrial grade pumps is that fine solids, dependent on what they are will erode impellers and pump housings, sharp sand being the worse.



    Interesting that people do not mind to treat very carefully their swimming pool with strong "healthy" chemicals - for their 10 min. swimming. And on the other hand are not concerned about their water used for cooking, washing etc...
    I agree with you, we use city water for showering and washing only, I can see the reservoir where the water originates from my window, it is then filtered, treated and pumped to the few houses around.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Your setup more complicated than mine. Consider simplifying.
    Main to filter, filter to tank (float valve to shut off main when full), tank to pump, pump to house. Although I have a valve to get main directly to house, all house water comes from tank to house.
    I agree Norton. Keep it simple. Mine is plumbed same way as yours. I did however T off the main in 3 places as it was ran to the back of the house to filter/tank/pump location and use that for car washing, plant watering, hosing off driveway etc. All house water goes through filter to tank to pump then to house for showers, drinking water, washing dishes and water for my ice maker in fridge (which has another filter prior to that for good measure, it came with the fridge). Would hate to have funky smelling ice cubes in my cocktail...)

  8. #33
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    When you've fixed your pipes maybe a kind word or two to your house, it looks rather sad.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    a larger wife might fix it
    this was also my solution

    I started off with the American Standard but after a decade of delicious pies . she is well 'earthed'

    I realize for some chaps this can be a very sensitive area, and while chemical and mechanical means can hep your "pump' I find I can get almost instant results in the Happy valley if during the heat of the action she inserts a finger.

    Anyway I trust our plumbing experts have assauged your angst and your flush with success
    I used to have a job at a calendar factory.
    I got the sack because
    I took a couple of days off.

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