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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by KiCanCummins View Post
    I do have some experience in Thai roofs.
    I do try to keep things simple KISS principle, but sometimes I get caught up with too much technology. The passive way is obviously the better way to go no need for electric.
    I will be using A/C when we build in Issan.

    As my member name kind of tells you of my nationality, Kiwi & Canadian.


    On Mrs KC’s house I designed a carport and had a local contractor source all the materials (gave him pretty much free rein on that) we ended up 5 years alter with the glue on foam & foil backing peeling off from the wrong adhesive used, Can’t find that contractor anywhere now.
    At a point we added to the carport and the next contractor saw the condition of the foam under the existing roof and guarantied this would not happen with the extension he would add to the existing roof, I had originally had the carport this size, but Mrs KC does not read plans and could not see the need for such a large carport, but she does like it now. And the foam/foil on the new extension is still like new 3yrs later. We deemed it too expensive to reroof the old roof at the time of the extension.


    Also her house attic cavity the reflective “sarking” that was originally installed has in some places degraded and is drooping down from the concrete tiles that are above it, so much for reflective barrier.


    CM dweller,
    I would not worry too much about the birds on the roof most of the time it will be too hot for them to walk on, our biggest problem with the carport is the pigeons and Minor birds like to sit on the rafters and poop on the car, LOL.


    As for Spray foam I said it was not good to spray on the underside of the metal roof for the obvious reasons, thermal expansion of dissimilar materials.
    But I would use rigid sheet foam under the roof battens between the rafters. Then on the top of the ceiling I would use the closed cell spray foam insulate and seal the ceiling from the attic.

    I have seen this on a few bird nests lofts to keep them cool. They also use a double qcon block wall with an air gap, near the bottom of the wall are a series of 6” pipes cut into the outer wall with a bug screen cover and at the top of the open cavity of the wall a bug screen is placed along the top, in all quite a cool dwelling. The bird house was about 10 meters wide by about 30 meters long and the equivalent of 3 stories high, quite a large structure, but of course no windows. This was just south of Hua Hin.

    David48atTD, what are your thoughts on a roof mounted solar water heater?

    I hope I have clarified my findings
    Lots of good info from you guys, good to be able to learn from each other.
    Sorry CMdweller no intent to highjack your thread.

    KC
    Thanks KC for that comment. Great info.

    2 Canadians in LOS. That's rare. I am from Vancouver.

    Yes, if we can learn from each other, then we can all be happier.

    I agree that the "social and cultural environment" is not really conducive to best practice here (losing face/lack of a critical feedback is hurting this culture), but we have our problems as well in our own countries. Snake-oil salesman anyone?

    As I said, I am not a roofer (metal or otherwise) and I am learning as I am reading.

    That is quite a bird house. I just could not visualize: "Near the bottom of the wall are a series of 6” pipes cut into the outer wall with a bug screen cover and at the top of the open cavity of the wall a bug screen is placed along the top, in all quite a cool dwelling." Are you suggesting I house all the birds I don't want. LOL

    Rigid foam in the floor of the roof seems like a good idea. I am a bit worried about the spray foam inside the conditioned space (say the drop ceiling space), but around the perimeter of the sheathing should be okay (inside and inside the drop ceiling for good measure). It should prevent any insects and any of the fibreglass dust from going in the wrong space, if the heat does not do the trick. I hear that fibreglass can sag, so ridid foam boards might be a better idea. They take less room too. Not sure if they are as good with soundproofing, but I could use a mix, putting the fibre on top of the boards inside the drop ceiling space, i suppose. Any thoughts?

    Here is a drawing I got from the architect just today. I have 2 large bedrooms downstairs and one up, where the living quarters and the views are. I have asked to remove a window downstairs for security, noise, and (to some degree) heat (east side / minimal heat at night). But, I am puzzled by the venting at the soffit regions. The wind going inside the roof seems minimal (if any at all), but maybe it is a good idea to have a small intake. I am told that it does create a better draft. Maybe they are using this technology. Any idea?



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  2. #27
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    I was going to spend a lot of time to reply and try and educate you a little more about building in Thailand but,
    when I read this statement of yours ...
    Quote Originally Posted by CMdweller View Post
    I have no windows in my bedrooms.
    I sort of figured that your idea/concept of building a dwelling/house/home is a galaxy away from mine.

    If you plan a bedroom with no windows, so I assume, a hermetically sealed, air-conditioned bedroom ... I can't
    assist you any more.



    One tip for you though as I work/ed in the industry.
    I'm not sure of your age and health status but, as we age, joint mobility deteriorates and the idea of climbing stairs
    to get to your bedroom becomes less appealing and, in the late years, close to impossible.

    If this dwelling is the one which 'you will curl your toes up in' then I strongly suggest a ground floor bedroom and
    toilet/bathroom.


    This was a great thread of the Members here builds, sadly, PhotoBucket destroyed the originals, but I enlarged some
    for the Forum to give you a small Idea of what has been built ... click this ... http://teakdoor.com/construction-in-...ml#post3680558 (A Better Gallery of House-Builds)

    Our fingerprints never fade from the lives we touch

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    I was going to spend a lot of time to reply and try and educate you a little more about building in Thailand but,
    when I read this statement of yours ...
    I sort of figured that your idea/concept of building a dwelling/house/home is a galaxy away from mine.

    If you plan a bedroom with no windows, so I assume, a hermetically sealed, air-conditioned bedroom ... I can't
    assist you any more.



    One tip for you though as I work/ed in the industry.
    I'm not sure of your age and health status but, as we age, joint mobility deteriorates and the idea of climbing stairs
    to get to your bedroom becomes less appealing and, in the late years, close to impossible.

    If this dwelling is the one which 'you will curl your toes up in' then I strongly suggest a ground floor bedroom and
    toilet/bathroom.


    This was a great thread of the Members here builds, sadly, PhotoBucket destroyed the originals, but I enlarged some
    for the Forum to give you a small Idea of what has been built ... click this ... http://teakdoor.com/construction-in-...ml#post3680558 (A Better Gallery of House-Builds)
    Dear David,

    I read one of your comments again in which you seem to complain about my long paragraphs. You seem to be having some issues with reading large paragraphs. I am so sorry. I do have a master's degree in literature and linguistics. I have been trained to write paragraphs around one thesis or topic sentence. I am not used to write one-liners. I learned not to in Grade 5.

    I appreciate your know-how in the building industry though. And I thank you for sharing your knowledge.

    Now I understand that the idea of having windows in all rooms --and bedrooms-- is the norm for you --and a lot of people. I am sorry if I have challenged these basic notions. As an outsider, as an alumnus, I have been trained to question everything. Sorry. While I understand that windows in a bedroom have some benefits, they have huge negatives. I hate noise, light and heat. I also love to sleep 9 to 10 hours. They can also be a security concern. I could use ear-plugs for the noise, but they bother me. I could use a mask, but it keeps me hot. I am not used to them. I also don't see the need to be in a bedroom and look out of a window. I never do. Of course, I could buy those triple glazed windows with argon gas and what-not to deal with the heat and the noise to some extent, but sadly here in CM, there are some planes that will fly nearby. I don't see the need to buy those expensive units. They will leak in a few years and will need to be replaced. To me, it is not a good solution and it is an expensive one.

    In your last comment, you decided to make you look very good and make me look like a nutter (by contrast) by assuming that I do not have a bedroom downstairs. Oddly, it is clearly stated in one of my latest post: " I have 2 large bedrooms downstairs and one up, where the living quarters and the views are. I have asked to remove a window downstairs for security, noise, and (to some degree) heat (east side / minimal heat at night)." I also explain why I don't like to have windows. I have a few ideas on how I can and will bring "fresh air" into the bedroom without bringing noise. Btw, I have 2 bathroom downstairs and a kitchen, but I don't plan to use them, unless the heat is too much upstairs. I am 56. I have never smoked and rarely drink alcohol. I am an active athlete. I plan to live until 85 or more, which is feasible given that both my parents were/are. So, to me, living quarters upstairs made a lot of sense. I figure I might as well enjoy the view and will be able to for at least 20 years. Btw, the 2 bedrooms are large enough to be LR/DR as well and one of them could be transformed into a bona fide LR/DR living space as well, with a bathroom. I carefully oriented the BRs so that they are not on the Westside or are shielded by a tree. The ones on the East side might get a double wall with a 15 cm gap and 6 inch total of fibreglass. I also plan to use the bottom BR(s) for Airbnb income. I don't know everything about buildings, but I can read or ask questions.




    Sorry if I challenged the notion that all bedrooms need to have windows. If you like them, I won't ostracize you. Some people can sleep with them. You can think what you want of me, but maybe I am not such a nutter after all, hey? I don't think you are the type to admit you erred, but surprise me. Btw, if I had more money, I would be even less a nutter, maybe I would look like a genius, paying for expensive add-ons and architectural designs, but I did it on my own.
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    Last edited by CMdweller; 16-12-2017 at 08:30 PM.

  4. #29
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    ^ Good luck with your build and thank you for not ostracizing me.

    Yours truly is a unique design and IMHO, most likely a challenge for a Thai Builder and possibly your wife
    to grasp your housing concepts.

    When it's completed, please come back with photos of the construction process, the finished product and
    maybe some antidotes.


    Two last pieces of parting advice ...

    1/
    If you are proposing a concrete slab on ground and ...
    Quote Originally Posted by CMdweller View Post
    the house has a large rice field on the north and east side that I am told could provide "microclimate" winds.
    You are in/near a rice paddy, consider a raised pad of earth to ease any flooding issues in the future and ...
    it's usual to 'season' the pad for a rainy season so that it finds it's natural level and becomes more compact.


    2/
    If you are in/near rice paddies, you may wish to check the title to the land as it's a different system to that which
    is common in the West.


    EDIT:-
    Also, good luck with the Air BnB concept (I missed that detail in the first reading of your post).
    I'm sure you will make an interesting Host should you decide to converse/interact with your customers.
    Last edited by David48atTD; 17-12-2017 at 02:36 AM.

  5. #30
    Member KiCanCummins's Avatar
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    Here is a graphic of what I intend to build I hope this photo thing works its the first time in 4 yrs that i upload a photo and the website has had a major overhaul so please bear with me.
    Moved back to Kanada

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