Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:53 AM
    Posts
    213

    Any electricians in?

    Anyone know if it's safe to use two pin Thai appliances in Uk three pin sockets?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:52 PM
    Posts
    1,132
    Quote Originally Posted by tj916 View Post
    Anyone know if it's safe to use two pin Thai appliances in Uk three pin sockets?
    In case the appliance body is all of plastics, then no problem.
    If the body is of metal to change the cable to one with three wires, the third wire connected to the metal body.

  3. #3
    Sukhumvet
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:54 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    9,717
    Does the house have an RCD unit? Should be in or next to the fuse/breaker box.

    If so should be OK if not you could buy one of these for peace of mind.

    Time Guard Circuit Breaker RCD Adaptor - UK Plug Only |
    www.partmaster.co.uk


    Also similar at Argos for 5.99

    But also what Klondyke says.
    No one on TD is gay. If suspect, it was probably because of the way they were reared.
    I apologize if any offence was caused. unless it was intended.
    You people, you think I know feck nothing; I tell you: I know feck all
    How much more grievous are the consequences of anger than the causes of it.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    David48atTD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:21 AM
    Location
    Palace Far from Worries
    Posts
    2,907
    From a technical point of view ... YES

    Thailand is 50 cycle / 220 volts

    The UK is 50 cycle / 230 volts ... used to be 240 volts but has changed to 230 volts.

    Australia is 50 cycle / 240 volts


    It's the cycles that is important. The voltage can vary.
    Australia's variation standard is +/- 10% The UK's is +10% - 6%
    All my Aussie stuff works in Thailand and Visa-versa.

    The USA 60 cycle / 120 volts ... so appliances need both a transformer and a converter. Some things like computers can handle this ... others can not.



    Sooo ... the simple answer is yep, should work.


    Is it safe? ... unsure.

    If the appliance is double insulated then the 'earth' is not required to be attached as the original configuration would have been '2 pin'.




    VocalNeil
    's suggestion re the safety switch is excellent and EVERY home should have one.


    Even some forgettable electricians have stuck the knife down the toaster to prise the stuck piece of bread and almost fried themselves, but were saved by the safety switch (cough, cough ).
    .
    Perspective is everything ... it's the difference between going through an ordeal or going through an adventure..

  5. #5
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,629
    Quote Originally Posted by tj916 View Post
    Anyone know if it's safe to use two pin Thai appliances in Uk three pin sockets?

    Thanks.
    Two pin so no earth, and therefore presumably the appliance is double insulated, and IMO should be OK.

    I've used my computer in the UK with no problems whatsoever. The issue you will have will be the plug and socket not matching. I used a travel adapter to get around that.

  6. #6
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,629
    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    The UK is 50 cycle / 230 volts ... used to be 240 volts but has changed to 230 volts.
    Officially yes, to comply with the EU, however, I think you'll find that in reality the voltage is still at, or very close to, 240 volts - using permitted variance (below) to be able to both comply with the EU regulations and at the same time stay the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    The voltage can vary.
    The UK's is +10% - 6%

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,044
    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD
    It's the cycles that is important.
    Sorry Dave, but that's not the case for the question at hand. Hertz has nothing to do with if an appliance is earthed or not. Klondyke was right in the first post.
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    in reality the voltage is still at, or very close to, 240 volts
    Makes little difference, 230 V or 240 V to the OP (or to the appliance). Klondyke was right.
    Earthing is providing an alternative path for the current IF the casing of the appliance is conductive AND if the circuit is compromised. It's a safety feature.

  8. #8
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,629
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    in reality the voltage is still at, or very close to, 240 volts
    Makes little difference, 230 V or 240 V to the OP (or to the appliance).
    I was simply enlightening David48 on the UK voltage issue. I thought that was clear from my post.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat
    Slick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,268
    Yes FFS you can plug it in and it will work.

    Its not the safest but it will work and its probably more safe plugging it in in the UK than plugging the same appliance in in thailand.

  10. #10
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,629
    Quote Originally Posted by tj916 View Post
    Anyone know if it's safe to use two pin Thai appliances in Uk three pin sockets?
    What appliances do you intend to take over?

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    Slick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,268
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    What appliances do you intend to take over?
    The mere fact that it comes factory with a 2 pin plug should answer most questions.

    If he cut off the 3rd pin or something then its more dangerous but still probably safer plugging it in in the UK than here.

  12. #12
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,629
    The reason I asked is because most things can be got in the UK and it would be easier just to buy new. I wouldn't want to haul a lot of appliances over, but an expensive single item (notebook for example) would be logical.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
    Slick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,268
    ^ Good point. Retarded to lug a rice cooker

  14. #14
    Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:53 AM
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    The reason I asked is because most things can be got in the UK and it would be easier just to buy new. I wouldn't want to haul a lot of appliances over, but an expensive single item (notebook for example) would be logical.
    Too true Nev, I originally enquired about my phone charger.
    But if there is room in my suitcase I would love to take my trusty toasted sandwich machine back home.
    Never let me down unlike the rest of the...............


  15. #15
    Thailand Expat
    fishlocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bungling in the jungle
    Posts
    3,814
    Laptop, tablet,cellphone chargers universal world wide for the most part.Read the AC/DC adapter. It should state;
    Input 100-240V-1.2A 50-60Hz
    output 20V--2.25A for a laptop.
    Cell phone charger=
    Input100-240v-.2A
    output 5v--800mA or there about.

    I would buy a dozen 1 dollar cell phone chargers and sell them for 2 or three back home for what they usually have to pay 5 or 6 for. It may be the only chance you ever have to brag you doubled your money in a day.5555.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
    fishlocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bungling in the jungle
    Posts
    3,814
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick View Post
    ^ Good point. Retarded to lug a rice cooker
    Hey now that's a bit rough. I brought my rice cooker on my last trip to Laos. Cost 1300 for the plane ticket but hell she does dishes too.

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat
    fishlocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Bungling in the jungle
    Posts
    3,814
    Your sandwich toaster will be fine. It's motors like in hair dryers that may burn up if designed for 110v-AC as well as the heating elements if running on 240V.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    Slick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,268
    I don't think his issue was the voltage & frequency but 2 pin plugs IE earthing

    And yeah phone charger is totally fine.

    Toasted sandwich maker thingy is fine too IMHO but anyway thats kinda heavy.

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,044
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Its not the safest but it will work and its probably more safe plugging it in in the UK than plugging the same appliance in in thailand.
    Dangerous advice. It's got nothing to do with which country's grid and house wiring it's plugged in to and everything to do with the quality of the appliance.
    The earth is for safety if the internal wiring in the appliance shorts with the outer casing.

  20. #20
    Sukhumvet
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:54 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    9,717
    Quote Originally Posted by tj916
    I originally enquired about my phone charger.
    Totally enclosed in plastic so OK.

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat
    Slick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,268
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Its not the safest but it will work and its probably more safe plugging it in in the UK than plugging the same appliance in in thailand.
    Dangerous advice. It's got nothing to do with which country's grid and house wiring it's plugged in to and everything to do with the quality of the appliance.
    The earth is for safety if the internal wiring in the appliance shorts with the outer casing.
    Nah not really. UK house wiring is coded & regulated and should have safety protections built in for leakage. Thailand is supposed to, but doesn't. Very many homes don't have anything but breakers and zero leakage protection. It's likely it will be safer to use this appliance in the UK because of the regulation & coding.

    Not all appliances are required to have a 3 pin plug. The fact that this one does not have one indicates it doesn't need one. These appliances are built for sale in several regions and listing regulations.

    Your logic is assuming that every appliance NEEDS to be bonded to earth to be safe and that's incorrect.

    Usually these appliances have something like a CE Listing tag on them for refrence as well if someone was so inclined to look it up.

    My point is, the fact that it doesn't have a 3rd pin usually indicates it doesn't need one.

    If an existing 3rd pin was cut off so it could fit into a 2 pin plug then that's another story but it's no different than if a 3 pin appliance was used with an adapter to fit into a 2 pin socket, same, and people do it all the time, everywhere.

    I would have zero issue using a 2 pin appliance in another country assuming the voltage & frequency is correct.

  22. #22
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last Online
    08-09-2017 @ 01:56 PM
    Posts
    49
    It all depends if the appliance is a Thai brand built for Thailand or international standards. I have seen two pin devices that have an earth screw on the back so just because it only has two pins don't assume it doesn't need to be earthed.

    But as others have said if it is all plastic you are fairly safe in assuming its double insulated

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    6,044
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Your logic is assuming that every appliance NEEDS to be bonded to earth to be safe and that's incorrect.
    Wrong. And I did not imply every appliance NEEDS to be earthed.
    You stated to the effect that plugging an appliance into the UK grid is safer than plugging it into the Thai grid regardless of the appliance, whereas I am saying the grid has nothing to do with it and that it's all about the safety of the appliance.


    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorbloke
    It all depends if the appliance is a Thai brand built for Thailand or international standards. I have seen two pin devices that have an earth screw on the back so just because it only has two pins don't assume it doesn't need to be earthed.

    But as others have said if it is all plastic you are fairly safe in assuming its double insulated
    Correct.

  24. #24
    Sukhumvet
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:54 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    9,717
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slick
    Your logic is assuming that every appliance NEEDS to be bonded to earth to be safe and that's incorrect.
    Wrong. And I did not imply every appliance NEEDS to be earthed.
    Maanam, Chill. The only real NEED in this, is Slick's NEED to be correct.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •