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  1. #1
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    Checking for Flood Risk

    If you're building or buying a house in Thailand, are there general ways to avoid places that are prone to flooding? It's obvious that you don't want to build low, but even if you build on a hill you might be in a landslide zone. Any way to do detective work on that? I would doubt it, but is there such a thing as flood insurance in Thailand?

    Edit: That's FLOOD Risk (what a dumb-ass).
    Last edited by LarryGee; 21-03-2017 at 04:32 AM.

  2. #2
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    I don't know where you are but in issan the ground is usually built up to road level about a year before construction
    Not convinced you could be safe in a large city as the drainage infrastructure is not maintained or updated to cope with the construction work

  3. #3
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    Yes in the cities you must be careful because drainage is a problem and also some places like parts of Bangkok are in flood zones.
    I would always build up the property with dirt quite a bit higher then the road.

  4. #4
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    Most of the time its local information (asking around) and taking the necessary precautions of fill dirt etc...

    If there are other houses around you build yours a bit higher than the rest and let gravity take course, creating a land grade that drains towards the road etc...

    If you are talking about local records & shit. Nah probably not unless BKK or CM or whatever where there is a bit more infrastructure.

    outside the tessaban you can pretty much do whatever the fuck you want.

  5. #5
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    Build high off the ground.
    They've been doing this forever, because it's practical and safe - for the obvious reasons, regardless of one's local.

    Much more logical than the ugly cement/block grounded structures that most slobber over.
    Dangerous all around.



  6. #6
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    ^ Looks nice no doubt but thats gonna be a mosquito infested sweatbox, jeff.

    Incompatible with my foreigner habits

    Cannot/will suffer

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slick View Post
    ^ Looks nice no doubt but thats gonna be a mosquito infested sweatbox, jeff.

    Incompatible with my foreigner habits

    Cannot/will suffer

    Pussies that can't acclimate shouldn't apply. [or live in the tropics]


    I'm sure you'd trade the flooding over your pussified Farang angst of the heat and mosquitos.

    FFS -

  8. #8
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    We're still in the states, but planning to move over there in a couple of years, and maybe buy/build after traveling around for a year or so. I'm thinking that if we bought in a city somewhere, we could check out the neighborhood for flood damage.

    Where we live in the US, we could get a 100-year deluge and never flood, because our house is built on rock and somewhat elevated. Some of our neighbors further down the street do get their basement flooded once in a while.

    Last year we were in Chiang Mai and an over-friendly coffee shop owner lady took us to her neighborhood to try to sell us her son's house. It was way out of town (past the big mall), and right on the shore of a lake. The whole house was mildewed, and the entire street and sidewalks were covered with black algae or something.

  9. #9
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    ^^^^
    Not to mention the cost. Wood houses are no longer cheap to build.

    I had the luxury of watching our building plot through two rainy seasons. I was able to see first hand what the water drainage around our land was like and added fill dirt where needed. Our house sits higher than road level and rain water drains around our house and winds up in our pond which is well below our house level.

    A little research will pay off in the long run.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme
    Pussies that can't acclimate shouldn't apply. [or live in the tropics]
    lol my spot in the states has the same climate for like 8 months of the year and the whole place is climate controlled.

    Takin a shit in a climate controlled space > sweaty shits & swatting mosquitos

    To each their own. I cant do it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryGee
    We're still in the states, but planning to move over there in a couple of years, and maybe buy/build after traveling around for a year or so. I'm thinking that if we bought in a city somewhere, we could check out the neighborhood for flood damage.

    Where we live in the US, we could get a 100-year deluge and never flood, because our house is built on rock and somewhat elevated. Some of our neighbors further down the street do get their basement flooded once in a while.

    Last year we were in Chiang Mai and an over-friendly coffee shop owner lady took us to her neighborhood to try to sell us her son's house. It was way out of town (past the big mall), and right on the shore of a lake. The whole house was mildewed, and the entire street and sidewalks were covered with black algae or something.
    Have a poke around here:

    coolthaihouse.com ? Index page

  12. #12
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    ^^

    Thanks for the link; forgot about that site.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryGee
    Thanks for the link; forgot about that site.
    Dunno if its still got an active group or not but still some decent info on there.

  14. #14
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    All paddy field by my house I wanted away from the the locals dog , chicken shit.Garbage thrown everywhere, noise pollution, traffic , no thanks
    I built a proper 2,5m high retaining wall with a French drain and weep holes directing the water away.
    Ferang stupid he do too much, after one rainy season a German who lives by me had his wall topple over into the field , had to basically build 160m of wall again
    He followed my design
    It's not just the house you have to think about when your building your plot/ home
    Last edited by jimbobs; 21-03-2017 at 01:13 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbobs
    I built a proper 2,5m high retaining wall with a French drain and weep holes directing the water away.
    Yep. This shit is kindergarten but for some reason, when people come to Thailand, they think its another planet where rain & flooding are somehow managed better with the local mentality of cheapest available option + buddha shrine + displeasure of filling their headspace with much.

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbobs
    Ferang stupid he do too much
    Yep. For someone to call you stupid, they have to first think themselves as smarter than you.

    Gotta ave a larf.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme View Post
    Build high off the ground.
    They've been doing this forever, because it's practical and safe - for the obvious reasons, regardless of one's local.

    Much more logical than the ugly cement/block grounded structures that most slobber over.
    Dangerous all around.


    I like that place.

    But, TBH, with 2 rugrats running amok, not a practical build, but I can appreciate the aesthetics of it.

    I don't like 'pole' houses, but that place does allow for enjoying the coolness between the earth and the floor. Plus, if it's slightly elevated, take advantage of the prevailing breezes.

    ---

    Back to the OP ... I used to sell land ... acreage land.

    I knew I had a genuine buyer when it was raining but he, and the Family agreed to go and look at a few blocks.

    Not a Sales pitch, but I did mention that the best time to view land is during/after a huge downpour and you get to see, not only your land's potential trouble spots, but also where your run-off goes and, MORE IMPORTANTLY, where your neighbours run-off travels.

    You need some really decent rainfall as the early precipitation usually just soaks into the ground, but after the ground becomes saturated, the puddles and rivulets flow and it can be really helpfull to observe that.

    That applies to Rural land.

    Buying in the City presents a completely different set of issues.
    .
    Perspective is everything ... it's the difference between going through an ordeal or going through an adventure..

  17. #17
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    You might find something thats fine now then the down the track a railway line gets put in or someone builds a dam way down the road and that could change everything to shit.
    It wouldn't be the first time it's happened.
    It was only a couple of years ago in OZ they found that a new rail line flooded a small town because the raised dirt in areas where it should have been on a bridge system to let the water pass.
    This is not the one I was thinking of but same deal
    Authorities to investigate whether rail line work caused Deception Bay flooding, north of Brisbane - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

  18. #18
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    Check out the area you are interested in the monsoon season after heavy rains.
    Its not unusual to see recently developed areas with new house built on it flooded after heavy monsoon rain, they do not have a clue here about installing drainage when doing a development and leave it out to save on costs

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slick View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryGee
    We're still in the states, but planning to move over there in a couple of years, and maybe buy/build after traveling around for a year or so. I'm thinking that if we bought in a city somewhere, we could check out the neighborhood for flood damage.

    Where we live in the US, we could get a 100-year deluge and never flood, because our house is built on rock and somewhat elevated. Some of our neighbors further down the street do get their basement flooded once in a while.

    Last year we were in Chiang Mai and an over-friendly coffee shop owner lady took us to her neighborhood to try to sell us her son's house. It was way out of town (past the big mall), and right on the shore of a lake. The whole house was mildewed, and the entire street and sidewalks were covered with black algae or something.
    Have a poke around here:

    coolthaihouse.com ? Index page

    Used to be much more of an interesting forum, until most lost the plot.

    Perhaps, it'll return to it's original form [or not].

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Most of the time its local information (asking around) and taking the necessary precautions of fill dirt etc...
    We asked around and everybody we asked said "no it's never flooded in that area" so went ahead and brought in the dirt and made a nice big pad higher than the road, that was in March, returned in November to find the entire area for miles flooded. the only area showing above water was a couple of inches of our pad.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnwadrick View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Slick
    Most of the time its local information (asking around) and taking the necessary precautions of fill dirt etc...
    We asked around and everybody we asked said "no it's never flooded in that area" so went ahead and brought in the dirt and made a nice big pad higher than the road, that was in March, returned in November to find the entire area for miles flooded. the only area showing above water was a couple of inches of our pad.
    I wonder if you can hire someone to do some simple investigations of the soil in an area you want to build - take a core sample and look for silt layers that would indicate recent flooding. Like a civil engineer or even an archaeologist?

  22. #22
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    Has more to do with the particular dwelling design/position than locale, as high water/flooding will occur most everywhere - frequently or infrequently.

    Per usual, the larger picture is miscalculated.

  23. #23
    Love Thailand Carnwadrick's Avatar
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    ^ the property has been in the family for generations and nobody could remember it flooding, it was our prefered location to build but can't take any chances so moved to second choice and higher ground. hope to start the build next year

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