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  1. #1
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    Issaan building project

    I have readed this and other forums and are researching and making plans for my coming house built. It will start when i feel i have the project planed as i want it.

    Some basic details, goals and plans:

    - Land is rectangular and 18m width limit house plans to be a rectangular plan probably max 12 m in width.

    - Location is not to see as a investment who can be sold again, but good location for my living ( i already live on location)

    - Room req: kitchen with dining area, living room, bathroom, large masterbedroom with bathroom (30m2+), 2 bedrooms, roofed terrace/outside area

    - Building materials: My current idea is to use the thinner chap blocks as double walls. I want to have a house easy to keep cold. I have trees who give some protection on the most sunny side. I expect use some kind of plated roofing with foil under to stop heat, then isolated ceiling. Inside ceiling will be light ceiling sheets.

    - I have good access to local B350 a day workers here, not much access to high level skill guys like foreman or engineer types. Im also plan to be on building to look after things and give some hands too. So as it looks i should go for a simple construction, currently im looking at Free House Plan 7.

    I also open for optional plans who fit the req, or can be adjusted. For this plan i thinking of extending it so its 4m between each cement pole both ways, so 8x12 or 8 x16m. Car area on plan would be change to outside area.


  2. #2
    Thailand Expat Humbert's Avatar
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    Where are you located?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Where are you located?
    30 min outside Korat


    Pink

  4. #4
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    Couple off points to think about?

    If you want a house that is easy to keep cool, how far are you willing to go to achieve that, which equates to how much do you want to spend.
    I don't know what "chap" blocks are that you are thinking about using for walls? I did give some consideration to going with double walls but decided against it, mainly because I didn't want to give a home to every stray "creature" from miles around! Finally went with a ~5" thick x ~12" aerated concrete blocks that have a high "R" value.
    Windows, in my opinion people tend to put far too many and too large windows in houses here, most times you are not trying to get light in, but keep it out!
    Again - my opinion, no sliding windows or doors, the el cheapo sliding windows and doors here barely seal never mind helping keep a low temp.
    Plan on insulating the ceiling with at least 6" of insulation and worth thinking about putting a fan high up in the gable with a thermostatic switch to suck out the hot air from the roof void.
    Good luck

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    Hi Airportwo, many good points. Yes i must agree i see most house plans have to much windows... I also thinking of a thicker concrete block as option, but i must check more on this. Keeping roofing as cool as possible is a must, i was thinking about a solar fan if i found something usable in normal price range, if not i look other options. What window type you suggest? If no sliding you mean normal hinged windows? I have not set my budget yet.

    Pink

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    Couple off points to think about?

    If you want a house that is easy to keep cool, how far are you willing to go to achieve that, which equates to how much do you want to spend.
    I don't know what "chap" blocks are that you are thinking about using for walls? I did give some consideration to going with double walls but decided against it, mainly because I didn't want to give a home to every stray "creature" from miles around! Finally went with a ~5" thick x ~12" aerated concrete blocks that have a high "R" value.
    Windows, in my opinion people tend to put far too many and too large windows in houses here, most times you are not trying to get light in, but keep it out!
    Again - my opinion, no sliding windows or doors, the el cheapo sliding windows and doors here barely seal never mind helping keep a low temp.
    Plan on insulating the ceiling with at least 6" of insulation and worth thinking about putting a fan high up in the gable with a thermostatic switch to suck out the hot air from the roof void.
    Good luck
    Airport, I have double walls on all those exposed to the outside and we have been living in the house over four years. During this time, we have not seen any "creatures" out of the norm and the extra insulation seems to help. The factor one does have to figure on is the added expense of a double shell. Labor and block are cheap in Thailand, so the additional cost is not that bad.

  7. #7
    Member John Lennon's Avatar
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    We built 2 years ago - Q-Con.
    The bigger the better. Then 7.5cm was considered good. We used 20cm.
    These are what are used in shopping centers.
    A/C use is minimal.

  8. #8
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam03
    We used 20cm
    Good exterior.

    Quote Originally Posted by adam03
    7.5cm
    Interior.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pink
    What window type you suggest?
    Doubled glazed low e do well but pricey. Upvc frames are best for insulation. I have lots of windows because I like natural light and open air. I mostly use A/C at night.

    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo
    at least 6" of insulation and worth thinking about putting a fan high up in the gable with a thermostatic switch to suck out the hot air from the roof void
    Good suggestion.

  9. #9
    Member John Lennon's Avatar
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    Amendment
    We wanted 20cm Q-Con. The builder had never used Q-Con before. We settled on 15cm. Inside - 10cm. The larger size would not have been a problem. A Q-Con cement is important BUT Q-Con were very helpful.
    Windows - Height - 1m. Width - varies. We did not use double glazing as the price is steep. Tinting - just do it. Eaves - similar.

  10. #10
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    ^
    That is why I did not use Qcon, since my building team had no experience with them and I didn't want to be the first. I had to settle for double wall construction at the time.

  11. #11
    Member John Lennon's Avatar
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    Do what you can sleep with. Insulation is a combination of many factors.

  12. #12
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers
    That is why I did not use Qcon, since my building team had no experience with them and I didn't want to be the first.
    Being the first not good.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    Couple off points to think about?
    Airport, I have double walls on all those exposed to the outside and we have been living in the house over four years. During this time, we have not seen any "creatures" out of the norm and the extra insulation seems to help. The factor one does have to figure on is the added expense of a double shell. Labor and block are cheap in Thailand, so the additional cost is not that bad.
    I'm not sure a thicker slab would be a benefit? I think for sure you need a air gap under the floor (use concrete floor planks) the thicker the concrete, once it has heated up will retain the heat longer?

    Good to hear there is no problem with double walls, we went with Q-con extra wide blocks they are about 3 times wider than the standard blocks and were a special order, the cost was just a little more (30k actually) than having double walls, they do work, checked temp and no penetration from sun heat during heat of the day in the summer time & it does get warm in the summer time here in Isaan!

    A "whole house fan" is worth looking at also if you have space for it, I looked at installing, but difficult as we have no gable ends, again it is part of the solution and helps with cooling and airflow as do extractor fans inside the house near windows and in bathrooms as they blow cool air into attic void space.

    For windows and doors we put in "hinged" UPVC double glazed.

    I did look at solar attic fans, they weren't available in Thailand when I looked, could get on Internet but never bothered, quality didn't look great!

  14. #14
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    Yes, there needs to be an airspace between the two walls to diminish heat transfer through the wall. When there is direct sunlight on the outside wall it is pretty warm to the touch while the inside wall is much cooler. There may be some heat transfer from windows and doors depending on how many and how big they are. All my windows are tinted, which helps as well.

    As mentioned before, there are many variables to insulating a house in Thailand. I also live in the NE and yes, it does get a bit warm.

  15. #15
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    ^ If you don't have an air gap you need "mass" that doesn't conduct the heat, which is what I did and what the large blocks are designed to do, I cant remember what the "R" value is for them but was good.
    A good point with the larger blocks is they were more or less the same width as the support posts, so internal and external walls are flat.

    Tinted windows also help and the larger the gap in the double glazing void and thicker glass also helps, really we should be fitting triple glazing, but Thailand very slow for such things and off course you need a market as not cheap.

    I think we live fairly close to each other rickschoppers, I recall reading another post of yours and thinking you must be close by. I am in Nadee.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pink View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    Where are you located?
    30 min outside Korat


    Pink
    Welcome to the neighborhood

  17. #17
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    Just as a comment, I did the standard red brick process on our home. We made sure we had longer eaves, excellent roof ventilation, better roofing materials, double pain windows through out and to this day it is never been uncomfortable in our house. I seldom ever use the AC's, ceiling fans do a great job.

    Of course I recognize that location will play a key role in that. we live up North and always have a nice breeze. Your build should be reviewed based on location and the surrounding environment.

    On Edit, If money is no object then use the best materials and practices available. With a smaller house the cost of quality materials might be a better option
    Last edited by JPPR2; 25-01-2017 at 09:28 AM.

  18. #18
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2
    I did the standard red brick process on our home. We made sure we had longer eaves, excellent roof ventilation, better roofing materials, double pain windows through out and to this day it is never been uncomfortable in our house. I seldom ever use the AC's, ceiling fans do a great job.
    Same here because Qcon not available local. Made sure all material locally available. Another bid factor is having foliage around walls to keep direct sun off.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2
    I did the standard red brick process on our home. We made sure we had longer eaves, excellent roof ventilation, better roofing materials, double pain windows through out and to this day it is never been uncomfortable in our house. I seldom ever use the AC's, ceiling fans do a great job.
    Same here because Qcon not available local. Made sure all material locally available. Another bid factor is having foliage around walls to keep direct sun off.
    Yes good point Norton, That's a must and we have some mature shade trees around a good portion of the house and I bought some larger ones that are in process of growing now. No need to wait for a small tree to grow. You can go buy mature trees for a very small price.

    Also to note, I highly recommend do not pour a huge slab of cement around the house. That becomes a HUGE heat sink plus the sun reflects off it and generates additional heat. Plant grass or something.

  20. #20
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    ^Ggood point regarding the concrete slab JPPR2, I bought a infrared thermostat gun last year and went to checking temperatures at various times of the day, its not unusual for the concrete temp to be + 20c higher than than the grass surround, I just checked now, its a relatively cool day, sun not so hot this time of year, temp of concrete is 12c higher than grass, and it will hold the heat once the sun "goes down".

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    ^Ggood point regarding the concrete slab JPPR2, I bought a infrared thermostat gun last year and went to checking temperatures at various times of the day, its not unusual for the concrete temp to be + 20c higher than than the grass surround, I just checked now, its a relatively cool day, sun not so hot this time of year, temp of concrete is 12c higher than grass, and it will hold the heat once the sun "goes down".
    I did same thing. I did a quick analysis with a 2 foot square area of dirt, Grass, rock and cement. My delta numbers were similar to yours. Believe it or not a nice bedrock area is better then just plain dirt. Grass is by the far the best and when the sun goes down the temperature is actually cooler as the grass produces dew. I have grass around my entire house.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    ^ If you don't have an air gap you need "mass" that doesn't conduct the heat, which is what I did and what the large blocks are designed to do, I cant remember what the "R" value is for them but was good.
    A good point with the larger blocks is they were more or less the same width as the support posts, so internal and external walls are flat.

    Tinted windows also help and the larger the gap in the double glazing void and thicker glass also helps, really we should be fitting triple glazing, but Thailand very slow for such things and off course you need a market as not cheap.

    I think we live fairly close to each other rickschoppers, I recall reading another post of yours and thinking you must be close by. I am in Nadee.
    I am about 12 kms outside Udon on the 210 near Na Wa Sol. You are more than welcome to come over and we can compare notes.

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    Today i had a meeting with a building team who built more of the higher end houses around here. I give him a print of this plan to give me a price, and he told 13k/m2 with 7cm quality concrete block and 15k/m2 with 2 x cinderblock wall. Building is around 130m2 he said ( when i check i get 116m2) so total around 1.69/1.950. Expensive or not? i will check more builders offcource, im not in hurry..

    Pink


    Last edited by Pink; 29-01-2017 at 12:15 PM.

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    To keep the roof cavity cooler, make your eaves as wide as you can and install air vents in them, this helps shade the walls as well in the heat of the day
    Install a wind powered air extractor on the roof, they call the wirlywirds i think and have a round ball like shape
    This constantly removes the hot air from your roof cavity as long as the wind is blowing which is most of the time where we live

  25. #25
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    ^^rickschoppers, be good to have a look at your place & your bike! lets plan on meeting soon.........

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