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  1. #1
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    Correct size tank and water pump

    This has probably been mentioned many times, but I have been unable to fiind a definitive answer, and need some help from one of you who may know.

    My house is a little more than 200 sq meters with 2 showers, 3 toilets, a washing machine, and 4 people living there.

    I need to have decent water pressure, and water available 24 hours per day, so will want a water tank and pump. I use government water. I do not want it on a tower, but on the ground with shade.

    I'm hoping for advice on what size tank, and what size and type of pump to purchase.

    Thank you for any help you may be able to give.

  2. #2
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    I would say that 1800 litre would be fine but it also depends on how good your mains water supply is !! If you have a constant supply then even a smaller tank would do but if your mains water goes off for a day or two then a bigger tank would be needed.
    I converted one of those concrete urns to use as a water tank ( holds about 700 Litre's ) and rigged it up with a float switch to my well pump and it kicks in when the urn is half empty and I have never run out of water .
    Big Ol' Lucky Ol' Al.

  3. #3
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    The tank size depends on the reliability of the government water. But if you must have a tank it should be at least one days supply otherwise why bother. So as has been said about 1600 litres. Buy one as big as you can afford over and above 1600. 2000 litre would be OK. Make sure government pressure is good enough to get to the top of the tank! If not you'll need two pumps, one to fill ,one to empty or bury the tank.

    Instal a bypass line around the whole thing and valves on inlet and outlet of pumps so that when the water pump fails, eventually, you can isolate and bypass and still use the lowest toilet while you drive to the store for a new pump.

    Pump depends on the height of the highest shower. Our highest shower is on the third floor and we use a simple Mitsubishi WP255-QS



    I confess to not knowing the difference between automatic and constant pressure!
    Last edited by VocalNeal; 04-01-2016 at 02:55 PM.
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  4. #4
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    We got 150 watt mitsubishi pump for about same size house, really not good enough pressure at all upstairs, but we have no tank. I'd go for at least 300 watt.

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    I should mention that this is a single story house, and I am completely ignorant about the workings of a pump.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by phinik
    My house is a little more than 200 sq meters with 2 showers, 3 toilets, a washing machine, and 4 people living there.
    My place the same except only 2 toilets.

    I have Mitsubishi WP255-QS pump and a 1500 litre tank buried. Also a simple single stage carbon filter feeding into the tank. All easy to find at your local hardware shop.

    Works well. About 10 years with no probs.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by phinik View Post
    I should mention that this is a single story house, and I am completely ignorant about the workings of a pump.
    A pressure pump in the 150-200 Watt category whould be OK for your needs Kang Yong Electric Public Company Limited


    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    Instal a bypass line around the whole thing and valves on inlet and outlet of pumps so that when the water pump fails, eventually, you can isolate and bypass and still use the lowest toilet while you drive to the store for a new pump.
    Or make sure that the mains water can be switched over to if the pump ever does fail ...as in the diagram below .


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    A 150-200 watt pump would be fine as long as you don't mind losing pressure in the shower every time someone flushes the toilet or if the washing machine is working, or if the two showers are on at the same time.

    A 300 - 350 watt pump is better and will hardly use any more power as it won't be working all the time, like a smaller pump.

    The difference between the two types of pump is that one is small and square with a small pressure tank (normal if you have a tank) and the other has a much larger pressure tank and is big and cylindrical (normal if you have no tank and pump from a well - illegal to pump direct from the mains), but there are advantages and disadvantages to either.

    To be honest, if you don't know much about it get advice from a good plumber or from a good hardware store as it depends on variables so what's best in one house may not be best for you.

    Ditto to the advice on a pre-tank filter for government water.

  9. #9
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    Thank you so much for your responses. It puts me on the right track.

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    No one ever moans about their tank being too big and personally I've always gone overboard on my pump as well.

  11. #11
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    illegal to pump direct from the mains
    Mine does as does at least two of my neighbors and I'll warrant all the houses in the street.

    I should mention that this is a single story house, and I am completely ignorant about the workings of a pump.
    From personal experience you need about 1 kg/cm of at the shower head so for a single story house at ground level you'll need minimum 1.2 kg/cm anything 200W or above will be fine. The difference in price between 200/250/300 will be minimal as has been said no one ever complained about
    too much water

  12. #12
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    We have a 250 W Mitsubishi pump and a buried 2,000 l tank. We have 4 bathrooms and a washing machine. Generally, it all works fine unless the water tank is less than half full and then the pump may not be able to lift the water up to the suction. I was always concerned about NPSH requirements, but I know no-one at Home pro would understand. Keep your tank fairly full, the pump should be ok.
    The pump is a beast. It's run dry several times and still keeps working. When this one fails, I'll get a 300 W pump next time.
    We've also installed a 3 stage filtration system upstream of the tank. Eventually, I'll put in a filter unit in the kitchen, so we have drinking water.
    Steve

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen View Post
    No one ever moans about their tank being too big and personally I've always gone overboard on my pump as well.

    .... as the Bishop said to the actress

  14. #14
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    Phuket we have 2/2650 litre tanks =5300 litres, pump is big enough to supply good water pressure to house and garden, some of our neighbors have one tank about 1500 litres but regularly run out of water in the dry season because the government water is only available 3 days a week and sometimes less often, and have to get a water tanker load.
    We never run out of water and have vege and flower gardens and sometimes have to top up the pool in dry season

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    illegal to pump direct from the mains
    Mine does as does at least two of my neighbors and I'll warrant all the houses in the street
    The reasons for not pumping direct from the mains, both from your own perspective and that of your neighbours, are pretty obvious. It really isn't to be recommended.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    We have a 250 W Mitsubishi pump and a buried 2,000 l tank. We have 4 bathrooms and a washing machine. Generally, it all works fine unless the water tank is less than half full and then the pump may not be able to lift the water up to the suction. I was always concerned about NPSH requirements, but I know no-one at Home pro would understand. Keep your tank fairly full, the pump should be ok.
    The pump is a beast. It's run dry several times and still keeps working. When this one fails, I'll get a 300 W pump next time.
    We've also installed a 3 stage filtration system upstream of the tank. Eventually, I'll put in a filter unit in the kitchen, so we have drinking water.
    Steve
    Hi Steve, i am interested in the "buried tank" Was it concrete constructed on site or was it plastic imported.
    Thank you.

  17. #17
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    It's a plastic tank. There's a pic of it in my thread about building a house in Nakhom Pathom.

    Steve

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    OK, here's a shot of our 2000 l water tank before it went into the ground:







    And a shot of it, after it in it's hole on the south side of the house:






    And another view from a different angle, so you can see the proximity to the house:





    We obviously filled it in, so, as long as there is inventory in the tank, the water will be relatively cool. That cooler water will also help with pump suction as well.

    Steve

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    why do you want it cool? shower only has to work harder to heat it, makes no sense to me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mykthemin View Post
    why do you want it cool? shower only has to work harder to heat it, makes no sense to me!
    It's a wee bit warm most of the year , we don't use much hot water from our solar hot water heater.
    And, as I said, cooler water helps with the pump suction. Less chance for cavitation.

    Steve

  21. #21
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    so you shower in cold water? no thanks. god the water would have to be nearly boiling to effect the pump.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykthemin View Post
    so you shower in cold water? no thanks. god the water would have to be nearly boiling to effect the pump.
    Nice of you to assume you know our water situation.

    Yes, cavitation does occur at the boiling temp, which is affected by suction pressure. Water can boil at temperatures lower than 100 deg C if you reduce the pressure, which can happen at the suction of the pump impeller.

    This thread is not about my house. He asked a question about our in ground tank and I provided him the information. If you want to criticize my set-up, please go to my thread and flail away.

    Steve

  23. #23
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    That golf ball is in a difficult spot , your reveredhighness !!





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    Looks only half buried, about right for a half baked idea. and look like a septic tank to me?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykthemin
    and look like a septic tank to me?
    why, has it got a gun and a fat wife?

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