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Thread: Water Tank Size

  1. #1
    Newbie Ganesh's Avatar
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    Water Tank Size

    Hi,

    I'm looking for a water tank for a large 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom home. I've got a 300 watt pump, but have no idea what size water tank to get. In the house it's just me, my wife and 2 young kids. City water is pretty reliable in my moo-bahn, but want to have enough stored in case it were to go out for a few days. Any advice on size would be appreciated.

    Cheers.

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    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    2000 litre

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    I'm with Baldrick on that one

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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    2000 litre
    Overkill.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ganesh
    300 watt pump
    Overkill.

    1500 litre tank, max and a 200w pump would do you fine unless you have a very high second or 3rd floor and use a lot of water...

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    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    ^ whaats the price difference between a 1500 and a 2000 litre polycarbonate tank ?
    400 baht ?

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    We have 5 bedrooms (technically 6, but last one is my office) and 4 bathrooms. We went with a 2,000 liter in-ground tank and 250 w pump.

    Everything seems fine when I was there. But my wife does tell me that sometimes there are problems if her brother is using water downstairs and she wants to shower upstairs. We do have a lot of piping. We probably should have used larger supply piping going to each bathroom, as I suspect there could be some head loss going on.

    When finances settle down, I might look into adding a second pump and ball valve cross-connect. Then set it up so that one pump supplies one end of the house and the other pump goes to the other end. The ball valve will normally stay closed, unless a pump craps out, then we can open it and still have water everywhere until bad pump is repaired/replaced.

    I forget what we paid for the tank. It was more than I expected, but it's got a heavier wall construction which allows it to be placed in the ground.

    Steve

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    You should assume 250 to 300 litres of water per day and person. We are 3 adults and 1 child (2 years old) and use 1'000 to 1'200 litre a day.

    The water tank should have a capacity form at least 2 days - depending on the local water supply. Other sources recommend a water reservoir for at least 3 days.

    The cost for a good water tank are about THB 10'000 per 1,000 litres.

    The 300 W water pump seems a good choice (depending on the piping system).

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    I've got a 2 story house with a 300w pump and I get a bit miffed when showering and someone turns a tap on downstairs. I reckon I'll put a bigger pump in and keep the old one as a spare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by juehoe View Post
    You should assume 250 to 300 litres of water per day and person. We are 3 adults and 1 child (2 years old) and use 1'000 to 1'200 litre a day.

    The water tank should have a capacity form at least 2 days - depending on the local water supply. Other sources recommend a water reservoir for at least 3 days.

    The cost for a good water tank are about THB 10'000 per 1,000 litres.

    The 300 W water pump seems a good choice (depending on the piping system).
    As an aspiring pommy soapdodger my water ,clean teeth and knob around same as wine 1 liter per day ,Thai wife,m-i-l,and daughter on 5 showers per day and rinsing all kinds of inedibles in the 3 sinks loads.

    A serious point about weight.I just built 2x 5 concrete rings to store roof run off for garden,pools etc (not drinking) but as Dr A and JJ advised I put about 10cm of rebar concrete underneath.I cannot recall the equation but even the strong plastic 2000 liter tanks are heavy full so I would not just park them on the sub soil.

    If already have concrete or tarmac a couple of 1 meter rebar fence posts as an additional base trestle should be strong enough,always worth planning where any leak may go,They don't all end up in Wales.

    Mine are fine ,only the pipe the 'builder" put in has a small seepage but he is to return for a second fix and is so cheap I shall not boot himup the arse , he knows my displeasure on pay day whe the LhaKhao appears instead of the Jamesons special old reserve.Seeing his polite smile dissolve is or September highlight.
    I used to have a job at a calendar factory.
    I got the sack because
    I took a couple of days off.

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    ^^^

    As far as weight goes, in Imperial units, a gallon of water weighs a little over 8 pounds. So a 2,000 liter tank = 528.3 gallons x 8 pounds/gallon = 4,224 pounds or about 1,916 kg.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen
    I've got a 2 story house with a 300w pump and I get a bit miffed when showering and someone turns a tap on downstairs.
    That's not a pump issue, it's how you've set up your plumbing/water flow, imho...

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    ^^^

    As far as weight goes, in Imperial units, a gallon of water weighs a little over 8 pounds. So a 2,000 liter tank = 528.3 gallons x 8 pounds/gallon = 4,224 pounds or about 1,916 kg.

    Steve

    Steve
    Part of the reason the rest of the world has gone over to using metric measurement is because it is so simple.

    I Litre of water = 1 kilogram therefore 2000 litres = 2000 kilograms or 2 tonne

    Same with linear measurements, none of the bullshit about:
    1 mile = 1760 yards = 5280 feet and 1 foot equals 12 inches.
    much easier:
    1 kilometre = 1000 metres 1 metre equals 100 centimetres = 1000 millimetres.

    When is the US going to move into the 21st century and use metric measure, they were smart enough to use dollars and cents when the English and Aussies were still using Pounds, shillings and pence which was just as much of a head F*** as using Imperial measurement units.

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    ^^^

    Ootai, no argument from me on going metric. I've got a course, that has been well received overseas using SI units, that I am trying to convert to Imperial units, just so I can offer it here in the USA.

    I was rounding off, so I was close. However, is it 1 liter fresh water or salt water that weighs 1 kg ?

    Cheers !
    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    ^^^

    Ootai, no argument from me on going metric. I've got a course, that has been well received overseas using SI units, that I am trying to convert to Imperial units, just so I can offer it here in the USA.

    I was rounding off, so I was close. However, is it 1 liter fresh water or salt water that weighs 1 kg ?

    Cheers !
    Steve
    Steve
    I now understand why we have a difference in the conversion.
    There are 3 "gallons" and being aussie I used the english one not the US one which you obviously used.

    Imperial Gallon (English) = 4.54609 litres = aproximately 4.54kgs = 10 pounds
    this is measured at 62 degrees F or 17degrees C

    US Gallon = 3.7854 litres = 8.34lbs = 3.78kgs measured at the same temperature.

    then there's the US dry Gallon - 4.405 litres but this is rarely used.

    If I want to do conversions I use my trusty old HP 48X calculator but I don'tty have that then I use google to find one on the net, there are lots of good ones there.

    As for your question regarding fresh or salt water I would think salt water is heavier because it is more dense than fresh water, whcih is why it is easier to swim in salt water. But as this thread is about water tanks for a house I assummed it would be fresh water.

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    You can allways turn your pump down a bit to run on 75% easy enough , but you cant turn it up anymore from the max setting

    so I like a bigger than nessasary pump

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    Ootai,

    Ehhhh, I always round off to ~4 liters = 1 US Gallon when doing conversions off the top of my head. The conversion program I used has 1 US gallon = 3.785412 liters.

    I agree that salt water weighs more than fresh. But you weren't clear about the 1 liter of water weighing 1 kg (fresh or salt).

    I poked around on line and found some references stating that 1 liter of salt water weighs ~1.027 kg and 1 liter of fresh water is the magic 1 kg.

    There once was an attempt to convert the US to SI units, back in the late 70's. But it fizzled out.

    Steve

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    Member BKKBILL's Avatar
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    U S has been increasing its use of metric units for many years, and the pace has accelerated in the past three decades but until metric is taught in schools there will be no change even though it is now the only industrialized country in the world that does not use the metric system as its predominant system of measurement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBILL View Post
    U S has been increasing its use of metric units for many years, and the pace has accelerated in the past three decades but until metric is taught in schools there will be no change even though it is now the only industrialized country in the world that does not use the metric system as its predominant system of measurement.
    While Ireland isn't really industrial try asking for 568 of Guinness in Glasgow and you'll be be asked if you require a half ,

    Of course a pint of plain is yer only man.

    At strangeways you may be able to sell your services for 28.5 grams of snout but not on the Moor or Pentonville.

    And drinking a pint of Ale in the Huntsman woulddn't feel the same if it was .91 metres.

    Naturally scientists those fine fellows who brought us GMO ,irradiated food,Fuckusheema and CFCs are all for the metre a largely French plot
    Becqueral to do with pwogress.

    Bring back the groat,rum sodomy and the lash a return to traditional values ,you may have to sacrifice a goat to assuage the ragheads and the god of Moses or be smoted verily (terms and conditioners may apply)

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    Member BKKBILL's Avatar
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    ^
    You could very well be right, thing is I wonder if a pint is a pint these days.

    My beer of choice here is Chang export big 640 ml small 330 ml a bottle. Had to look that up as who would give a rats ass.

    As for a 2,000 L tank of water it's heavy.

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    The reason the U.S. gave up on the metric system is that too many, not very intelligent people whined and complained that they wouldn't know how many MPH they were going if they switched to metric. Or how hot it was in Fahrenheit, or how many inches something was.


    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    Ootai,

    Ehhhh, I always round off to ~4 liters = 1 US Gallon when doing conversions off the top of my head. The conversion program I used has 1 US gallon = 3.785412 liters.

    I agree that salt water weighs more than fresh. But you weren't clear about the 1 liter of water weighing 1 kg (fresh or salt).

    I poked around on line and found some references stating that 1 liter of salt water weighs ~1.027 kg and 1 liter of fresh water is the magic 1 kg.

    There once was an attempt to convert the US to SI units, back in the late 70's. But it fizzled out.

    Steve

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    I wanted to get a bigger pump to insure that I had maximum shower velocity and volume but people said the pvc pipe would explode. Do they do 1 inch or 1 1/2 inch copper pipe here?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Your name here View Post
    I wanted to get a bigger pump to insure that I had maximum shower velocity and volume but people said the pvc pipe would explode. Do they do 1 inch or 1 1/2 inch copper pipe here?
    People are wrong methinks...village water uses blue pipe,I assume from pretty high volume pumps?
    Seen large diameter black PVC?...probably more durable and flexible..comes in coils....uses compression joints I believe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBILL View Post
    U S has been increasing its use of metric units for many years, and the pace has accelerated in the past three decades but until metric is taught in schools there will be no change even though it is now the only industrialized country in the world that does not use the metric system as its predominant system of measurement.
    This is a really astonishing that USA stubbornly still insist on those old bloody units. If working according the inch units, how to summarize e.g. 12" 3/16 + 11" 7/32? When an engineer loose his clever conversion booklet, he is lost.

    Or how to know if with this Fahrenheit I will get the water frozen?
    I am buying wood from US by USD/mbf - who knows that? (I do, had to).
    Luckily not by bushel (and they are 3 different), as it is still practised somewhere.

    Is USA more conservative than the good old England and her subjects (Canada, OZ?) where they already had changed to SI system?

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    Quote Originally Posted by crepitas View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Your name here View Post
    Do they do 1 inch or 1 1/2 inch copper pipe here?
    People are wrong methinks...village water uses blue pipe,I assume from pretty high volume pumps?
    Seen large diameter black PVC?...probably more durable and flexible..comes in coils....uses compression joints I believe.
    No copper, if you buy the blue PVC, ask for the thicker version, then no problem with any usual pump. Of course a good connecting technique (sand paper prior to glueing) is always recommended.

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    Most problems with water flow is the pipe diametre is to small good flow for 1 tap.
    But if you run a larger header pipe then run smaller pipe to each tap you will have good flow to all taps.

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