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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Spray Insulation (Moisture retention)

    Is it available here or is there an alternative? I'm looking to insulate some shipping containers. Alternatively, is it possible to use apply paint used on the hull of a ship.

    I need to insulate followed by gypsum board. As there will be no holes made in the container, thin steel box section, instead of wood 2x2 will be welded to the steel surface followed by the gypsum either bonded, or self-tapped screwed or both?

    One way or the other I need to prevent moisture from entering the inside of the container.

    Thanks
    Last edited by Jesus Jones; 29-04-2014 at 09:54 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    One way or the other I need to prevent moisture from entering the inside of the container.
    Not sure to be honest. Might it be easier to accept some will come in and deal with it with a dehumidifier and other moisture busting devices?

  3. #3
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    Make a long tray ,so you can fill with red oxide & dip your 2x2 into before welding.
    Spray polyurathane foam can be good or can be not good.
    We use the PU foam under the floor of small boats, but it held a lot of water.
    This was many moons ago.
    If you go the PU foam PM me & i will give you some idea's.
    I like styrene foam.
    Good luck JJ

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    Albert Shagnastier's Avatar
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    Paint the container white/silver to reflect the sun.

    Use studwork framing that leaves a 10cm gap. Fill the gap with rockwool. Cover with plasterboard. Job done.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier View Post
    Paint the container white/silver to reflect the sun.

    Use studwork framing that leaves a 10cm gap. Fill the gap with rockwool. Cover with plasterboard. Job done.
    Good idea, but being corten steel i'm looking for it's original rusty look. In places anyway. I've heard rockwool isn't a good idea with shipping containers. I just seem to remember somewhere that spray foam or anti-fouling paint used on ships was ideal. Just can't remember where I read it.

    Thanks though.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    Make a long tray ,so you can fill with red oxide & dip your 2x2 into before welding.
    Spray polyurathane foam can be good or can be not good.
    We use the PU foam under the floor of small boats, but it held a lot of water.
    This was many moons ago.
    If you go the PU foam PM me & i will give you some idea's.
    I like styrene foam.
    Good luck JJ
    Thanks

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones
    One way or the other I need to prevent moisture from entering the inside of the container.
    Not sure to be honest. Might it be easier to accept some will come in and deal with it with a dehumidifier and other moisture busting devices?
    Possibly, but I'd rather make an attempt to get it right. It will be a pretty big place consisting of 3 x 40ft and 4 x 20ft containers overhanging a mountain edge. It will be a weekend/holiday home so if I'm not there to monitor it, it could get out of hand.

    We're going green even though I don't believe the world is at its end!

  8. #8
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    Albert Shagnastier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier View Post
    Paint the container white/silver to reflect the sun.

    Use studwork framing that leaves a 10cm gap. Fill the gap with rockwool. Cover with plasterboard. Job done.
    Good idea, but being corten steel i'm looking for it's original rusty look. In places anyway. I've heard rockwool isn't a good idea with shipping containers. I just seem to remember somewhere that spray foam or anti-fouling paint used on ships was ideal. Just can't remember where I read it.

    Thanks though.
    Rock wool is a fucker to work with (fibreglass) but cheap.

    Expanding Foam Insulation is quick and easy - but expensive. Also, expandable foam dries out, cracks and starts to fall apart after a few years so has to be re-done.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier View Post
    Paint the container white/silver to reflect the sun.

    Use studwork framing that leaves a 10cm gap. Fill the gap with rockwool. Cover with plasterboard. Job done.
    Good idea, but being corten steel i'm looking for it's original rusty look. In places anyway. I've heard rockwool isn't a good idea with shipping containers. I just seem to remember somewhere that spray foam or anti-fouling paint used on ships was ideal. Just can't remember where I read it.

    Thanks though.
    Rock wool is a fucker to work with (fibreglass) but cheap.

    Expanding Foam Insulation is quick and easy - but expensive. Also, expandable foam dries out, cracks and starts to fall apart after a few years so has to be re-done.
    I wonder if a combination of the anti-foul paint and rock wool would suffice? Might be an idea!

    As for cost, we are saving in other areas but I believe moisture is the only real thing to combat with containers.
    Last edited by Jesus Jones; 29-04-2014 at 09:56 PM.

  10. #10
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    Damp and condensation prevention system

    Order a few of these bad boys



    Job done.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier View Post
    Paint the container white/silver to reflect the sun.

    Use studwork framing that leaves a 10cm gap. Fill the gap with rockwool. Cover with plasterboard. Job done.
    Good idea, but being corten steel i'm looking for it's original rusty look. In places anyway. I've heard rockwool isn't a good idea with shipping containers. I just seem to remember somewhere that spray foam or anti-fouling paint used on ships was ideal. Just can't remember where I read it.

    Thanks though.
    Most ship get painted with red oxide & anti-foul is used below the water line, as it fall apart.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat Jesus Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    Damp and condensation prevention system

    Order a few of these bad boys



    Job done.
    Just being reading about them on another site. Looks like an option. One advantage is that all my containers won't be in contact with the floor.

    A site recommends simple ventilation holes being adequate.

  13. #13
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    I'm not sure that anti fouling paint would be of any use for you. It's developed to inhibit the growth of weeds, barnacles and things which it does by either being a bit tricky to stick onto, or by slowly eroding.

    Containers are a bit like boats in that they are fundamentally designed to keep water outside, which can lead to problems with a lack of air circulation inside.

    As with unattended boats, I would say that having plenty of natural ventilation would be the key. Staying on the nautical theme you may want to look at adding one or two solar mushroom vents to each container:



    These should whir away happily whilst the place is locked up creating some air circulation.

    A cheaper option, and given you are going to be building on a mountainside then you may get a reasonable breeze, is something like a boat's dorade vents (pointing in opposing directions to give you an 'in' and an 'out' vent) which could also work:





    The problem with using the silica gel container dry poles is that they only last for so long before needing to be replaced. If you completely seal the container then you can use them to get the humidity down to a point where you will inhibit mould growth, but you'll need about six to eight per 40' container. I'm not sure where you are planning on building this but if humidity is a potential problem then I'd simply get a dehumidifier or two and leave them running on a time switch or, if such things exist, a humidity switch when you are away (powered by a solar panel?).

    Personally I'd simply make sure the interior walls were well painted with some form of epoxy paint, the floor was sealed/varnished and then keep everything fairly open plan (shelves instead of cupboards) and not keep too many moisture absorbing things in there (overstuffed sofas and the like). Mould needs two things to grow - dampness and some form of food source - untreated wood and fabrics get dirty after a while and have the potential for mould growth.

    I'd then make sure there was there was decent ventilation and fingers crossed it would be enough to keep moisture from being an issue when you are away.

    The area that could be a concern though is if you are planning on using air conditioning when you are there as it could be a cause for condensation to form on the inside walls unless you insulate the containers that you will run the a/c in. My thoughts would be to use polystyrene sheets against the metal (you are creating an unventilated space and polystyrene doesn't absorb moisture), then either normal or exterior grade gypsum on the inside wall (i'm not sure if exterior grade is less absorbent than the normal gypsum), or ideally that thin cement board stuff that you need an angle grinder to cut.

    If there's to be no aircon then I'd keep it simple with bare painted metal walls.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Jones View Post
    Is it available here or is there an alternative? I'm looking to insulate some shipping containers. Alternatively, is it possible to use apply paint used on the hull of a ship.

    I need to insulate followed by gypsum board. As there will be no holes made in the container, thin steel box section, instead of wood 2x2 will be welded to the steel surface followed by the gypsum either bonded, or self-tapped screwed or both?

    One way or the other I need to prevent moisture from entering the inside of the container.

    Thanks
    lots of sites & info if ya google mate.?
    eg. Shipping Container Homes

  15. #15
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    SprayFoam Thailand

    Lohr Trade Insulation Construction

    Here are a couple of companies in Thailand spraying this stuff on. It will stop water coming through, but will not stop water in the air condensing. However, is the outside wall of the containers are hot by virtue of being in the sun all day, then water will not condense on the surfaces, thus no damp, and you will instead have to fight the various moulds and fungi that will form over time.

    As above, ventilation and air movement will be critical. Perhaps there is a way to link a wind turbine on the roof to a fan inside through cogs and stuff (cheaper than getting a punkawalla to sit their all day and night).

    Catching moisture in the air when you lock up and go. A bin full of BBQ charcoal will do this. You can also create your own dehumidifier with a bucket full of rock salt, hole at the bottom, letting the water fall into a drip tray or a line leading outside. You could make both devices look nice of course, and does not have to be literally a bucket sat in your mountain retreat.

    IS there going to be a picture thread of this fascinating build?
    Originally Posted by bsnub "No wonder I drive a tesla"

  16. #16
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    Do you have pics of your build? Thinking about doing (2) 40ft containers side-by-side here with (2) 20 ft containers stacked on top

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