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  1. #1
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    ceburat's Avatar
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    Thailand Building Construction

    Sorry to start a new thread, but, I cannot find the information that I need in the other construction threads.

    I am presently having my home built. No contractor involved. A relative is building and has done a fine job so far. I am now living in part of the house. However, he as well as I are lacking in knowledge when it comes to building strong enough for the second level.

    I need to know the minimum requirements for the post and beams, cement and iron(rebars) to build the following. I would also like to know what is considered adequate or best. Any and all adivse is welcome.

    The part I am concerned about is the two-story(two level) part of the house. It will be 5 meters wide and 9 meters long. I plan to place cement reinforced post every 3 meters along the length of the building on the sides only. So from one side of the building to the other, there will be a 5 meter span with no support underneath. I need to know the requirements for building the beams and post. Size of rebar? Number of pieces of rebar per post? Size of rebar for beams and number of pieces. Recommended configuration would be welcome also. Minimum post/beam size - cement.

    The ground floor will be cement and there will be a 10 foot ceiling. Walls cement blocks-rendered. This 5M X 9M room will have 4 post on each side, each with a beam overhead.

    The second level will have a cement floor/ceiling. This level will be used for a raised patio and will be tiled. Walls will only be half walls with post going up to support the gable roof. The gable roof will run the length of the building. Stairs to the second level will be on the outside of the building.

    Please load me up with all do's, don'ts , specifications, recommendations, etc.

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Go see a civile engineer or an architect.
    To start with what is the soil like, does it need piling like a lot of land does in Thailand.
    Long beams over three metres are dodgy if done with concrete due to teh dual tension, and compression as it sags. So it must be built to design criteria that only a civil engineer will know.
    I build ships and offshore platforms made of steel, so I cannot help you.
    A sketch or drawing of your intentions would help as well.
    Good luck

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat Boon Mee's Avatar
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    I'm sure DD won't mind if I pass on a link to a good Thailand-based construction forum: Thailand - Expat Builders' Guide and Forum

    It's run by an **spit**, **spit** American named Dozer who has his shit togeather. Lots of good info there.

  4. #4
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    Yes very good forum, but no-one on that forum can give ceburat what he needs.
    But plenty of info all the same.

  5. #5
    ding ding ding
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    5m spans for concrete beam are not normal here.

    The max is see in general house construction is 4 meter span.

  6. #6
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    I have had 7 metere spans built, the beams need to be 50cm deep and have monster irons inside

    the only real advice, already given, is get an architect to do some plans

    if you just continue to do it yourself, then either you will put up a dangerous building or, with luck, you will overbuild, wasting money

    an architects drawing do not cost much. They are also useful for planning permission...do you have that?
    I have reported your post

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat
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    My wife started having second thoughts about the roof top patio. She was afraid too many relatives and friends would visit (live) there. I wasn't sure of the soil there in that area so I just cancelled the idea. One large bedroom there with a simple gable roof.

    Thanks to all of you who provided information.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    I have had 7 metere spans built, the beams need to be 50cm deep and have monster irons inside

    the only real advice, already given, is get an architect to do some plans

    if you just continue to do it yourself, then either you will put up a dangerous building or, with luck, you will overbuild, wasting money

    an architects drawing do not cost much. They are also useful for planning permission...do you have that?

    I have no permits, permission, etc. I checked, my wife checked, and the only requirement in this area is a photo of the house when finished. When the first part of the house was finished my wife took a photo and used it to obtain her house book. This was done directly thru the Captain and other official/s who assist him.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy
    then either you will put up a dangerous building or, with luck, you will overbuild, wasting money an architects drawing do not cost much.
    My experience is that the 'architects' here just copy someone else in the office specs and then add a bit on the size of everything for luck. The designs themselves are usually way over spec but compensated for by builders who think that concrete with the consistency of soup is strong as well as being easier to pour, or that concrete beams can be poured in two parts with a join in the middle.
    Lord, deliver us from e-mail.

  10. #10
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    or that concrete beams can be poured in two parts with a join in the middle.
    For a two storey house, isn't that effectively what happens anyway, with the second floor pillar being poored on top of the first one? So how bad can that be?

    [just asking.. already scanning for the exits. ]

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteLotusLane
    For a two storey house, isn't that effectively what happens anyway, with the second floor pillar being poored on top of the first one?
    That is a vertical section and the weight is all downwards in compression plus there will be (hopefully) lots of steel in the floor section where the pour comes together. What they should NOT do is pour half the column and then let it set and pour the rest of it.

    Too often you will see a beam stuck on the side of a column with a couple of bits of 6mm rebar hammered into the column for the beam to attach to. In that case there is a strong shearing action. Builders here seem to think that concrete has some sort of gluing properties.

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