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Thread: Your opinion

  1. #1
    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    Your opinion

    ok i don't know construction terms other that foundation and pilar.

    our old house Thai style, decent foundation, and those large concrete pillars that the locals use, all standard around here, ground floor is OK and all cemented, the top floor is wood, full of it of which i want to burn then turn it into a bungalow with a concrete roof.

    plans is to remove wood from top floor, expose top of all pillars, then make a wood box all the way around and across connecting all the pillars and fill it with steel and cement,
    then lay down the concrete slabs and add more steel and concrete,
    turning it into a bungalow with a cemented roof.
    my worry is if the ground foundation and pillars would hold the weight.

    i hope you understand my question
    cheers
    Sorry about me horrible speling

  2. #2
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    I can't answer you question but the first thing anyone will ask is what size are the existing pillars.
    So post the measurements and maybe someone can help you

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    they 25cmx25cm

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    Sell the wood, don't burn it. Lots of buyers for it you'll find.

    I have one almost the same description, but I'm using it as a temporary hovel while I build my western style house on adjacent land. I will sell off the wood house later and use the concrete floor level for a shop and storage area.

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    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    will make charcoal with it,

    no one will buy it, full of termite, but will give me pleasure seeing it burn and it will make the in laws pull their hairs

    how could i work out if it can hold the weight of a cemet roof, try it an hope?
    come on
    someone must have seen it or heard of some conversion like this

  6. #6
    TD Fat Club VP Dillinger's Avatar
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    try asking the contractor

  7. #7
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    Are you talking about cement tiles or a cement flat roof here ?

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    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan
    Are you talking about cement tiles or a cement flat roof here ?
    cement flat roof which will then accommodate a steel frame for roof

  9. #9
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    You're going to put a concrete floor plus a roof on something built to support a regular wooden house? That doesn't sound like a great idea. If you're making a bungalow, what's the point of the concrete floor? It just sounds like an expensive heat trap.

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    A flat concrete roof in a bungalow its not unusual and i don't think its a heat trap at all

    A flat roof like this

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zooheekock View Post
    You're going to put a concrete floor plus a roof on something built to support a regular wooden house? That doesn't sound like a great idea. If you're making a bungalow, what's the point of the concrete floor? It just sounds like an expensive heat trap.
    Sounds a very good idea. Can use the concrete floor as a drinking (sorry drying) area and the top roof will keep the sun off - so quite the opposite to a heat trap - and a good idea in the tropics

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zooheekock View Post
    You're going to put a concrete floor plus a roof on something built to support a regular wooden house? That doesn't sound like a great idea. If you're making a bungalow, what's the point of the concrete floor? It just sounds like an expensive heat trap.
    Sounds possibel.

    Have you considered double pyramid roof allowing hot air to be drawn up,the roof can be metal frame C bar with tiles and a whirlgig may help cooling.

    You need to balance some variables

    Cost,appearance,weight

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    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    how would i do that if the idea is to remove all the wood from upstairs, then level all the walls make a cement box on top of the walls connecting all the pillars with cross beams all in cement then lay down the flat cement roof.

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    Much of the heat gain in a house comes through the roof so if you haven't got that worked out, your concrete roof is going to sit there all day sucking up enormous amounts of heat which it will re-radiate onto your head through the afternoon and evening. I would suggest making your roof out of something both light in colour and thermal mass - it will radiate heat away during the day and what it doesn't will dissipate rapidly in the evening plus you will have a better chance of being able to use the existing columns. And I definitely wouldn't look at what your neighbours have done (unless it's 80+ years old); most Thai architecture is an extended essay in ugliness, waste and inappropriate design.

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    Concrete is basically a storage heater. Enjoy your warm nights/expensive AC bills.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zooheekock
    inappropriate design
    i suppose beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, i mean just look at socal's Girlfriend
    i dont agree with that, i will help keep the house cool.

  17. #17
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    It's inappropriate in the sense that very few houses are built for the climate, not that they're ugly (that's an additional failing). Anyway, up to you but if you think that putting an enormous heat sink on top of your house is going to make it cooler, you might like to read up on thermal mass and designing for this type of climate before you make any final decisions.
    Last edited by Zooheekock; 09-09-2013 at 02:11 PM.

  18. #18
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    The subject of this thread is about whether or not the foundations are sufficient to make the change from lightweight wood to very heavy concrete

    I doubt it, as most houses are built to a budget and the foundations would only be strong enough for the projected house

    25x25 pillars are quite small, esp. if you consider they may be rendered to that size and are, in fact, smaller

    another factor would be the sizes of the supporting pads (feet); you will have to dig down to check those

    the best way forward would be to kill the termites, keep the house, and build yourself a new one nearby. The wooden one could be good for guests
    I have reported your post

  19. #19
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    Talking about concrete roofs and heat sinks

    nowadays, it is quite common for the flat concrete roof to be insulated from the underside rooms so any heat does not make the house hot

    I have just built a house in Portugal and have done just that - the top of the house is a great tiled roof terrace and there is no noticeable heat transfer to the rooms underneath

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    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    we have tried everything on the termites
    also they eaten into too much wood
    it does not feel safe in it,
    but treatments for termite are welcome as suggestions, i can always try,

  21. #21
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    Although I am an engineer, I am not a civil or structural engineer and would be very reluctant to give you more than a simple personal (not professional)opinion.
    Firstly it is impossible to answer your original question regarding whether your existing pillars (25cm square) would support a concrete roof.
    You don't say whether the pillars have any steel inside them and you won't know without cutting one in half.
    You also don't say how thick a concrete slab you want top place on top of them as a roof, so how could someone work out the weight they need to support and you don't specify the spacings of the pillars?
    My concern would be any "internal" pillars as the perimeter pillars could be helped by building a concrete perimater wall that is load bearing. The internal pillars could also be removed and replaced by something more substantial in order for them to support the weight of the roof.
    My advice would be to find yourself an architect or a structural engineer as they have software that they use, which would soon provide the answers you need and any money spent would be cheaper than the trial and error method, especially if it stayed up for a year but fell down while people were inside after a year or so.
    You also have to consider the fact that your footings may not be able to withstand the load even if the pillars can, just as Dr A said previously, they may settle more with extra weight and that would cause further problems as the load may then be spread unevenly.
    As for the concrete roof being a heat trap you could always grow a garden on top which would act as an insulator but add more weight to your problem.

  22. #22
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    get rid of any nests and spray all the wood; replace any too weakened

    we ended up replacing all the internal wood in our house! cheap enough and it now looks great

    then we protect the house with annual ground injections, although you could use the more advanced chemicals

  23. #23
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    Without entering into the discussions about heat and weight regarding a flat, concrete roof, I would think other issues to consider would be making sure that the roof is watertight and dealing with the run-off. I have enough difficulty dealing with the recent heavy rains in Thailand and I've got a sloping roof and gutters that struggle to handle the run-off.

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    Simply consult with a good builder in your area, it is a good option because the well known about construction then us. If you are new to your community then ask the peoples living there for a good builder.

  25. #25
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    its structural engineering and usually an architect can calculate it...
    it depends on the pillars but also on the inside walls and how they are built...

    you are going to put such a metal roof on the bungalow ?
    otherwise it probably wont stand the rain (for long) ?

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