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  1. #1
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Blocking light / deflecting heat on windows - Best method?

    We just moved into a new 2 story rental house and we want to darken the bedroom (and some other rooms) and try to deflect some of the heat coming in. The obvious first option that comes to mind is the black / silver sun blocker curtains, but do those actually deflect heat or just block the light? I've also seen some film online that claims to reduce heat, but I'm not so so how it is for blocking light.

    The house is very hot, more so than most I have lived in. I'm thinking with proper sun blocking and adding some insulation in the attic it may cool it off. If any of you guys are experts in cooling off a house, I'm all ears. The walls were built with Q-Con but I believe the problem stems from no insulation or air flow in the attic and too many windows with zero protection from the sun/heat. However, this is not my area of expertise so I'm just stabbing in the dark.

    We have a year lease so I don't mind spending a few baht on something we can take with us when we leave, as our next move will hopefully be into our own home.

    Much thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Things you could take with you wouldn't include the best options, big shady trees....
    Spend a few thousand baht on reflective auto film.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, like Necron, I'm thinking of some film that you put on the windows. Stop the radiant heat there. Curtains are more of a hassle and they are inside the room.

    Get some air flow in the house, do the windows have insect screens ? If so, open them up.

    Putting some insulation in the attic space will help block the heat. What about a whirlybird or two on the roof to help remove the hot air ? Based on your other posts, does this PD House have soffit vents ?

  4. #4
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99 View Post
    Things you could take with you wouldn't include the best options, big shady trees....
    Spend a few thousand baht on reflective auto film.
    Is the film for home the same for cars? I'm guessing it may be but I've never bought either.

    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    Yeah, like Necron, I'm thinking of some film that you put on the windows. Stop the radiant heat there. Curtains are more of a hassle and they are inside the room.

    Get some air flow in the house, do the windows have insect screens ? If so, open them up.

    Putting some insulation in the attic space will help block the heat. What about a whirlybird or two on the roof to help remove the hot air ? Based on your other posts, does this PD House have soffit vents ?
    Yes, we have the windows open with screens and a few fans blowing. At night it isn't that bad but it is still a lot warming than where we just came from on the 4th floor in a condo building a few blocks away. That place was very cool most of the day while this house is more or less an oven.

    I haven't fully climbed into the roof yet, just did a quick check for insulation, but at a glance I didn't notice any whirly birds or even an opening for air flow in the attic. I do know PD House contracts out their work, but besides the bathrooms in this house I would be pretty disappointed if I owned it. It looks like the idea was there but the workmanship maybe was poorly supervised.

    Going to put some insulation up in the roof, hopefully that will help some. And if the film is easier to use than curtains maybe that will be the way. Do you know if you can buy the film at Home Pro or Home Mart?

    We rehabbed a townhouse in Pattaya not too long ago and didn't have such heat issues there as we were well shaded and it stayed fairly cool there, so heat proofing a home is a first for me.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino View Post
    Yes, we have the windows open with screens and a few fans blowing. At night it isn't that bad but it is still a lot warming than where we just came from on the 4th floor in a condo building a few blocks away. That place was very cool most of the day while this house is more or less an oven.

    I haven't fully climbed into the roof yet, just did a quick check for insulation, but at a glance I didn't notice any whirly birds or even an opening for air flow in the attic. I do know PD House contracts out their work, but besides the bathrooms in this house I would be pretty disappointed if I owned it. It looks like the idea was there but the workmanship maybe was poorly supervised.

    Going to put some insulation up in the roof, hopefully that will help some. And if the film is easier to use than curtains maybe that will be the way. Do you know if you can buy the film at Home Pro or Home Mart?

    We rehabbed a townhouse in Pattaya not too long ago and didn't have such heat issues there as we were well shaded and it stayed fairly cool there, so heat proofing a home is a first for me.

    Thanks again.

    Yes, it seems with PD House it is truly hit and miss. I've got some issues, but nothing like what happened to richard's build.

    I thought it was a PD House standard to have 3" of fibreglass insulation up in the attic. I asked them to double it, not sure if they did. I'm also going to put at least 6 more inches in within the year.

    I can't tell you where to buy the film, as I sit here in the USA, but I would think any of the "Home" stores would...might know. PD House is supposed to be installing some that green reflective heat glass in our place.

    Yes, you need something to block the sun baking into the house. Can the landlord pay to put in a nice shade tree or three ? I wouldn't pay for it, since you're only there for a year. And the attic space needs to breathe, but again, don't sink too much money into it (unless you can take it with you).

    Good luck !

  6. #6
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    Yes, it seems with PD House it is truly hit and miss. I've got some issues, but nothing like what happened to richard's build.

    I thought it was a PD House standard to have 3" of fiberglass insulation up in the attic. I asked them to double it, not sure if they did. I'm also going to put at least 6 more inches in within the year.
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better? I really have no experience with insulation at all.

    In regards to PD House having 3" of fiberglass... they don't have anything up there but the heat. I suppose it is possible the owner choose not to have it put in or they cheated her, as she is pretty clueless as to what is going on with the house. Anything is possible here I suppose. In the kitchen all the shelves in each cabinet were sitting on the bottom shelf. I went to put them in the proper place and notice ALL OF THEM were cut too short to actually sit in place so not one of them is useable, so they just sat them in the bottom and called it a day. Not even sure what the builders were thinking on that one other than what time is the next whiskey break.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better?
    the thicker insulation is better, and you can get it with foil backing, so you win both ways; just be careful to keep any foil away from electrical fittings like inset lamp backs

    the windows could be shaded with awnings; the plastic ones are not too expensive

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino View Post
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better? I really have no experience with insulation at all.

    In regards to PD House having 3" of fiberglass... they don't have anything up there but the heat. I suppose it is possible the owner choose not to have it put in or they cheated her, as she is pretty clueless as to what is going on with the house. Anything is possible here I suppose. In the kitchen all the shelves in each cabinet were sitting on the bottom shelf. I went to put them in the proper place and notice ALL OF THEM were cut too short to actually sit in place so not one of them is useable, so they just sat them in the bottom and called it a day. Not even sure what the builders were thinking on that one other than what time is the next whiskey break.
    Oh it looks like they installed the foil backed insulation. But I'll lay more on top of it. I don't care if it's foil backed or not. All that fiberglass creates little air spaces, to help block the heat. It's like wearing layers of clothes when you go someplace really cold. The different layers will help create insulating pockets to keep your body heat in.

    The Q-Con blocks work in similar fashion. All the tiny air bubbles help act as an insulator.

    Basically the more the better. Most houses in USA have at 12" of fibreglass. But that's also to help keep the heat inside.

    Yes, it sounds like the home owner got screwed over in your place. I've tried to ride PD House hard (as best as I can), so I think it helps.

    Steve

  9. #9
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dino
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better?
    the thicker insulation is better, and you can get it with foil backing, so you win both ways; just be careful to keep any foil away from electrical fittings like inset lamp backs

    the windows could be shaded with awnings; the plastic ones are not too expensive
    Thanks DrAndy, appreciate the info.

  10. #10
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dino
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better?
    the thicker insulation is better, and you can get it with foil backing, so you win both ways; just be careful to keep any foil away from electrical fittings like inset lamp backs

    the windows could be shaded with awnings; the plastic ones are not too expensive
    Thanks DrAndy, appreciate the info.

  11. #11
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dino View Post
    What made you choose between the thicker fiberglass insulation vs the thinner silver colored insulation they have at the stores here? Is the thicker fiberglass insulation better? I really have no experience with insulation at all.

    In regards to PD House having 3" of fiberglass... they don't have anything up there but the heat. I suppose it is possible the owner choose not to have it put in or they cheated her, as she is pretty clueless as to what is going on with the house. Anything is possible here I suppose. In the kitchen all the shelves in each cabinet were sitting on the bottom shelf. I went to put them in the proper place and notice ALL OF THEM were cut too short to actually sit in place so not one of them is useable, so they just sat them in the bottom and called it a day. Not even sure what the builders were thinking on that one other than what time is the next whiskey break.
    Oh it looks like they installed the foil backed insulation. But I'll lay more on top of it. I don't care if it's foil backed or not. All that fiberglass creates little air spaces, to help block the heat. It's like wearing layers of clothes when you go someplace really cold. The different layers will help create insulating pockets to keep your body heat in.

    The Q-Con blocks work in similar fashion. All the tiny air bubbles help act as an insulator.

    Basically the more the better. Most houses in USA have at 12" of fibreglass. But that's also to help keep the heat inside.

    Yes, it sounds like the home owner got screwed over in your place. I've tried to ride PD House hard (as best as I can), so I think it helps.

    Steve
    Excellent info, I wasn't aware of it working like that or that being how Q-Con worked. I've even used Q-Con before in a small rehab job but didn't understand the science of how it worked. Thanks.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino View Post
    Excellent info, I wasn't aware of it working like that or that being how Q-Con worked. I've even used Q-Con before in a small rehab job but didn't understand the science of how it worked. Thanks.
    Be warned, however, that Q-Con blocks are not the best choice for a standalone wall. I don't think they can support that much weight. You need a frame to support the loads and the Q-Con blocks are just a filler. You can see clearly see this in my house build project. We have a lot of pre-fab concrete columns and beams that were fitted together and support the whole house. The Q-Con blocks then go in to define the actual walls. They are actually quite lightweight and easy to shape by hand, as you probably know.
    But I think they require a special mortar. Dr. Andy would know the details of that. I've seen some other discussion threads about that.

    I like his idea of installing some cheap awnings to help block the sun shine through the windows.

  13. #13
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    Does this PD house build most ESAAN houses ?

    Why always speaking about them and still working this company when it is clear that they are so bad ?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang
    Be warned, however, that Q-Con blocks are not the best choice for a standalone wall. I don't think they can support that much weight. You need a frame to support the loads and the Q-Con blocks are just a filler.
    Not so sure about that - the manufaturers claim they can be load bearing

    the 200mm are suggested for that

    BLOCKS

    Q-CON block is 200 mm high and 600 mm long,
    the thickness may vary between 75 mm
    and 375 mm in 25 mm increments.
    A variety of Walling System is possible,
    however the standard Q-CON buildings
    has 200 mm thick external load bearing
    walls and 100 or 125 mm internal
    non load bearing walls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang
    I like his idea of installing some cheap awnings to help block the sun shine through the windows.
    yes, here are some examples in aluminium

    Aluminum Awnings, Fabric Awnings, Sun Control Devices

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by stevefarang
    Be warned, however, that Q-Con blocks are not the best choice for a standalone wall. I don't think they can support that much weight. You need a frame to support the loads and the Q-Con blocks are just a filler.
    Not so sure about that - the manufaturers claim they can be load bearing

    the 200mm are suggested for that

    BLOCKS

    Q-CON block is 200 mm high and 600 mm long,
    the thickness may vary between 75 mm
    and 375 mm in 25 mm increments.
    A variety of Walling System is possible,
    however the standard Q-CON buildings
    has 200 mm thick external load bearing
    walls and 100 or 125 mm internal
    non load bearing walls.
    Well, I didn't know about Q-con until my house build. I haven't visited their website. And ours are a miserly 9 cm, hence the pre-fab concrete frame.

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    I know it doesn't address the main issues, but fitting a few blackout blinds may help keep temps down a wee bit along with the reflective film. Just keep them shut in parts of the house you're not currently using, or shut them all when you go out and it might drop the temps a couple of degrees.

  18. #18
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Update: Since the 2nd floor was the hottest, and I mean walking on the sun hot, we figured step one should be to block the windows with blackout curtains, connecting them with velcro to the back of the existing curtains. The windows are very large and we can take these with us when we move, resizing them if we have to in the future.

    Results: A darker and slightly 2nd floor. As expected.

    That said, it is still an oven. I think our next step is to lay insulation in the ceiling and try to block some of the heat that is coming in from the attic, which has no current insulation, vents, or whirly bird. From what I've read you can reuse batt style insulation, so we can take this with us when we leave as well. Anyone have experience with reusing insulation?

    Our next move is hopefully into our own place, so that's why I'm OK with spending some money now on the rental on items we can use on our own place later.

    The home owner doesn't want us to put awnings outside the windows, which is a double disapointment because not only would it help block more of the sun, but we have zero shelter from the rain. I made the mistake of leaving the windows open when we went to sleep a few nights ago and woke up to a floor of water and all curtains and new blackouts soaked. It is a modern style house, more like a box if you ask me, but there is no ledge or roof overhang to protect against sun or rain.

    Honestly, the architect who designed this house needs a swift kick to his dangling bobbies. No shade from sun, no shelter from rain, skinny halls, very low ceilings (I can reach up and touch with ease), and a staircase from hell that is borderline impossible to move large objects up. Stuff to be expected from a rehab job where you have to deal with what you have, but they built this from the ground up. *sigh*

  19. #19
    Member Dino's Avatar
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    Forgot to add...

    We picked up a little "UV protection" black film at Home Pro to test on one of the windows. I was unsure of it out of the gate but they claim it has UV protection so we gave it a test run. We cleaned the window, sprayed water, attached the film, smoothed out the bubbles, and when the sun came up we could tell quite a difference with that alone before we closed the black out curtains.

    Midway through the scorching day, it all fell off. Three separate pieces of it, one for each large pane of glass in that window, all fell off. Two days in a row.

  20. #20
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    If you don't need the light, an old nightshift worker in the tropics remedy that doesn't not fail.
    Tape tinfoil, shiny side out to the windows.

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