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  1. #1
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    I talked about using a mixture of 1 part motor oil to 3 parts turpentine. First I did a coat of shellac. I have been doing a weathering test. About two months in the sun, and it is holding up very well. Much better than teak oil. I will probably go with this method. I may add an additional top coat of shellac. I'll post a current photo later today.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickyusa
    I like the look of teak oil, but it is not very durable.
    luckily teak is, it just weathers grey

    the oil merely enhances the look of it

  3. #3
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    He doesn't say what his house is made of.

  4. #4
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    What would be the cost of this in comparison to wood stain?
    Is it for use internally or externally or both? (because normal teak/tung oil would be sufficient where no sun is on the wood- as i believe it).
    I wanted to go this route but was in some ways lead to go the other way, it seems that applying so often would be fine, and so has a real appeal because the other costs a lot of money, for what seems fairy unskilled labour.

    We compared a wood stain (ICI Cuprinol, Chaindrite) clear matt, semi gloss the cost of which is 450 badt(4li) with the lid refund. For exterior use i am happy because of the protection i hope it will give and the cost.
    Inside i have wanted something less chemical and more natural, which is why we have used shellac, oil, but with a lacquer. My honest opinion is the wood stain looks identical to the oil, to the lacquer and so on. The reasoning now, why spend so much on this process and to use teak oil directly to the wood.

    The last thing i want to know is, are you sanding your wood first and to what finish?
    Was the wood planed?

    thank you for your insights.
    im hot its so hot today.......milk was a bad choice!

  5. #5
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    3 liters turpentine and one liter cheap motor oil, about 200 baht? Not sure about the shellac. Cheapest if you mix it yourself. I would probably use the shellac whether I was using my home brew or commercial stain. I'm planning on using it inside and out.

    This is 20 days in the sun. Expensive teak oil on the left, my concoction on the right.


    And this is after 57 days in the sun. The teak oil continues to fade out. My concoction (on the right) looks relatively unchanged.

  6. #6
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    What happened to the original post in this thread? I didn't start it.

  7. #7
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    The motor oil preparation leaves the wood a little darker than what I personally like. What about the flammability?

    I have eight 2.5m x 4m teak panels I need to finish. They will be outside and half will have more sun than the other half. I have used varnish on a few windows and like the way it brings out the grain of the wood. This is the product I am most used to being around boats most of my life. It does require a regular tune-up depending on the sun exposure, but it seems to do well in weather and sun. Many boat owners used teak oil, but I never liked the final finish.

    Most on this site want to know about durability and cost while I am also trying to factor in the final look and finish. I will need to make a decision soon since the wood panels will be going up on the house soon.

  8. #8
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    My samples are mai taeng (teng) not teak. As that is what my house is made of. Essentially, the same as what is commonly known as Philippine mahogany if I am not mistaken. Darker, redder, and harder than teak. I originally read` about using motor oil on another forum. Someone that was building and selling teak houses recommended it. I have no info on flammability.

  9. #9
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    The following is how a commercial woodworking shop in Bangkok finishes garage doors made of Taeng wood (commonly known as Balau), Shorea obtusa:


    FINISHING (MARITIME)
    1. 12-Step PermaLane II®
    2. Penetrating wiping stain sets the color
    3. Three Separate coats of alkyd moisture seal with fine sanding between coats
    4. Two coats of imported from Germany ‘Bayer Brand’ catalyzed Poly-Urethane with ultraviolet absorbers. Light sanding between coats
    5. Stain brightener applied
    6. Detailed hand rubbed to smooth satin finish

    The above is from their website: Garage Wood Door and Gate Custom Carving Design for Darrin from Pasadena USA

  10. #10
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    Yes redwood is much harder than teak, i quite like the lighter one too. the one on the right looks dirty somehow. Shellac gets my vote, but so does wood stain i think rothernburg has no voqs in it, and is apparently very good. Otherwise for outside in the sun a stain i think is fine. cheap.
    But for inside obviously a no no. im going with teak and i might finish with shellac.

  11. #11
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    I was talking about Mai Taeng (teng), not Mai Daeng (redwood or ironwood). Shorea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I prefer the darker redder one. Looks more like finished mahogany. Not trying to imitate teak.

  12. #12
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    It is my understanding that redwood is also resistant to termites due to its hardness. What other woods here in Thailand are good to use?

  13. #13
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    Several of my interior posts a mai praduu. It went through the fire of the previous house and survived. Very pretty pink color and grain. Incredibly hard.

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    Oh ok, I have mai teng too. Im using them actually like you, for floorboards. We are also going to be using it in the eaves and ceiling under the terrace.
    Mai teng is a nice hard wood, Mai daeng also. We have collected a fair bit of various hardwoods from Teak, mai padu, mai teng, mai daeng, mai ma kaa and so on. All used for different parts of the house.
    Mostly mai daeng and teak for posts. Mai daeng for floorboards as well as mai padu.
    All of them i would say need some treatment for termites if recently cut, unless the wood is old and you know that it less likely to get eaten. The one exception is Teak if its old, where as all other wood i have seen have problems. Normally little tunnels running along the outside of the wood indicate this best. However water, and posts being submerged in soil can also make it easier for termites to eat through rotted wood, but all this will do is make the bottoms look rubbish and need cutting off if someone is planning to buy. The only case where this wasnt so, was when the wood was sited more than 60 years ago, most of the wood was grown to a much older age. When i have seen posts like this submerged they have no effect from termites or rot, though this is just to buildings i haven seen.

    I know what mai teng looks like, when planed and sanded it has a reddish but light/pale colour, less red than mai daeng. Im not sure what it looks like yet when oiled or stained, so if i get a chance i will show you some comparisons.
    Mai padu is very nice it is chosen for its colour and grain, normally for floorboards stairs and walls. We have mai pa du for the stairs and they look stunning. We also have just acquired some old handcut mai padu very wide planks, and we look forward to seeing how they come out too.

    Well when you get close to a formula decision, please let us know.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wimpy View Post
    I was talking about Mai Taeng (teng), not Mai Daeng (redwood or ironwood). Shorea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I prefer the darker redder one. Looks more like finished mahogany. Not trying to imitate teak.
    I like the red one too, but the left one looks cleaner. If you can get the darker looking marks out i would say you're on to a winner. Are these similar to what you're using because the wood here doesnt look that nice in comparison to the floorboards and other that you have used? Is it scrap, or actually from wood you will be using?
    Did you sand it down first? as it looks quite rough.

  16. #16
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    I think shellac would have held it better after the oil. From this piece on furniture its one main disadvantage is contact with acid or alkaline substances. but for a natural finish their seems to be more that outweigh the negative.

    SHELLAC

    We have used shellac flakes dissolved in ethanol and i think the finish is superb.

  17. #17
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    It is the exterior siding from the village house. Sanded to remove the red paint/stain it came with. It has been in the weather for the past 30 or so years, so it is definitely rougher than some of the interior wood.

  18. #18
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    That makes sense then. Im still trying to argue the point to the wife that the outside really doesnt need to be sanded like everywhere else. No one is going to be staring point blank at it at 3-6 meters high in the sky. Am i going to win? NO.
    I bought a Dainichi planer industrial beast, so everything pretty much goes through that and its made the finish look really nice and easier to sand.

    So hopefully we shall see the fruits of that. If its outside at height it doesnt really matter then, its more durability so forget what i said.

  19. #19
    Newbie Aromaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk View Post
    . . . We have used shellac flakes dissolved in ethanol and i think the finish is superb.
    @benlovesnuk: Please be so kind as to guide me - where did you get SHELLAC flakes in Thailand. Been looking for it a while and never seen. Want to French Polish some Mai Makha Burl. If any help - I am near Pattaya.
    Last edited by Aromaz; 30-03-2012 at 07:10 PM.

  20. #20
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    Hi, i just got it locally to me in Chiangmai, but not so much for you if you're in Pattaya. Here is a place i found on the web give them a try?
    Company Name:Mahachai Shellac
    About Us:We, Mahachai Shellac, are the number one manufacturer of Dry Shellac Flakes in furniture grade in Thailand under well-known brand named NOK. The factory was established in 1981 by management team who had years of experience in field of shellac more than 25 years. The quality of our products, satisfactory services and the application of high tehnology in quality control system are our outstanding qualification that brings about trust and reliance to customers. The strong points of Mahachai Shellac Products are totally dissolve, six months long life, strong manufacturing capacity over 200000 kgs annually, and variety products: Red shellac flakes, Bleached shellac flakes, Seedlac. Mahachai Shellac always keeps on improving the quality standard in the industry and service as the customer's satisfaction being the most important part of company policy. Our staff are appreciated to serve you and if there is any further information, please kindly contact marketing department Tel 662-3318890-3 Fax 662-3318894 Company
    Business Type: Manufacturer
    Product/Service(We Sell):Shellac
    Address: 55/5 Sukhumvit Rd. Phrakhanong
    Number of Employees:11 - 50 People
    Contact Person: Ms. Kanokphorn S.
    Address: 55 / 5 Sukhumvit Rd. Phrakhanong
    City: Thailand
    Province/State: Bangkok
    Country/Region: Thailand
    Zip:10260
    Telephone:66-02-3318890-3
    Fax:66-02-3318894

  21. #21
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    Any shop that specializes in supplies for cabinet makers will have them. There are quite a few such places in Chiang Mai, and I'm sure they are available in your area as well.

  22. #22
    Newbie Aromaz's Avatar
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    Thank you for that info. I think I know all wood/tool/carpentry shops anywhere between Chonburi and Rayong. Big and small. Plenty of variety varnishes, PU, etc - but Shellac flakes is no go. Besides words I also scout with photos. Guess here it is more about quick production where nothing beats varnish or PU. I guess we can't have it all! Lately we have fantastic machines and tools around here.

  23. #23
    Member wimpy's Avatar
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    If you are not going to use a lot of it, you can get it premixed. It comes in a brown beer bottle with a shark on the label. Check the manufacture date, as it goes bad. Most hardware stores have the premixed variety. It comes natural or in various colors.

  24. #24
    Newbie Aromaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wimpy View Post
    If you are not going to use a lot of it, you can get it premixed. It comes in a brown beer bottle with a shark on the label. Check the manufacture date, as it goes bad. Most hardware stores have the premixed variety. It comes natural or in various colors.
    Thanks, I need a 1/2 Kg or so flakes a time. We are building yachts and I am making small decor items at home. Sometimes bigger furniture. Not all will be French Polish! Will only use on really fancy/exotic pattern wood

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