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Thread: Marmite's Pad

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ossierob View Post
    Yep good luck Marmite.....My wife built our first place here with just a little input from me...together we would get concensus and she would go ahead and organise and pay...cheaper that way I believe....I must confess she was strong and made the building team redo things we didnt like or agree to and the end product is pretty good...far from perfect as some of the posts on here seem but nevertheless pretty good. We used concrete and rebar. On the land at the back I am now looking around for ideas to construct a work shed for me and a small wood thai style house....I will watch your build with interest Marmite
    You are a lucky man to have a wife with SOME business sense. I wouldn't trust my wife with any kind of building project. She has no clue as to how things should look. She looks at it like a Thai with no concept of getting a good job that not only looks good, but works as it should. Example; She replaced a door when I was out of town. Even though the door stuck and at times wouldn't latch, she said the man did a good job installing it.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan
    so presumably when your new one is built that comes down
    I think the woman who lives there will be a bit pissed off if I demolish her place.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bangyai
    cumberland sausages
    I would do a lot for sausage right now.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Even though the door stuck and at times wouldn't latch, she said the man did a good job installing it. ralphlsasser is offline Add to ralphlsasser's Reputation Report Post Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
    and the problem with the replaced door was....? I've got a neighbor who slams his door twelve times to get it shut for over a year. He never thinks there's something wrong with the door. Just difficult to close. Thai repair services are a real treat.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailing into trouble
    I would do a lot for sausage right now.
    Surely that kind of behaviour dosent belong in Marmites building thread

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    I think the woman who lives there will be a bit pissed off if I demolish her place.
    I can imagine , sorry I thought that was your place now fronting the land

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post


    Will you be building that in South Park?
    brilliant, i didnt realize that that is what i was thinking until i read it.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    ^ can you lend us some money please.
    After all the problems I've had getting this house built, I have no money left to loan/give.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Even though the door stuck and at times wouldn't latch, she said the man did a good job installing it. ralphlsasser is offline Add to ralphlsasser's Reputation Report Post Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
    and the problem with the replaced door was....? I've got a neighbor who slams his door twelve times to get it shut for over a year. He never thinks there's something wrong with the door. Just difficult to close. Thai repair services are a real treat.
    The problem with the door was, it was out of plumb. Causing it to not close to the frame squarely. Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan
    Surely that kind of behaviour dosent belong in Marmites building thread
    A good bit of Cumberland is welcome anytime any place!

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    American?

    it is an informal US term that’s not that widely known and certainly doesn’t appear in many reference works. One problem in finding it is that it often goes around under an alias, appearing as wapper-jawed, whomper-jawed, whompey-jawed, whoppy-jawed or whompsey-jawed, and also seems to be related to the even rarer lopper-jawed, which the Dictionary of American Regional English records from 1916.
    But neither of the two dictionaries that list it agree with your friend’s meaning, one giving no clear definition, the other — which records it as wapperjawed — saying it means having a projecting lower jaw. So I turned to the experts on the American Dialect Society mailing list, who confirmed that the term is known and still used in the US on occasion and does indeed usually mean askew. Several subscribers to the World Wide Words newsletter have since reported that the word was familiar to them from decades ago in reference to something out of alignment or ill-made. It seems to be much less common than it once was.
    Its origin seems to be in the English dialect verb wapper, meaning to blink the eyes, or perhaps to move tremulously, which may come from the Dutch wapperen, to swing, oscillate, or waver. A more common form at one time was wapper-eyed, which variously meant to have sore eyes, or eyes that continually shifted from side to side, or were unsteady or blinked a lot.
    There’s an example from the East Anglian dialect dated 1825 in the Oxford English Dictionary that suggests it once meant a wry mouth or a warped jaw. A similar idea is in a sentence recorded from 1848: “Fancy an heir that a father had seen born well featured and fair, turning suddenly ... squint-eyed, hair-lipped, wapper-jawed” (hair here may be a misprint for hare). Taking these with all the other early examples, it seems that wapper meant something that was deformed or distorted, for which askew is as good a word as any. Quite how the more specific term wapper-jawed took on the broader sense of wapper is unknown, as there are very few examples of its use in print at any time.
    It’s easy to see that one of these could over time have evolved into the sense of having a projecting jaw. That sense is first recorded — in the Century Dictionary — in 1891, but it has also been found in a letter written by Mark Twain in December 1863: “He is a long-legged, bull-headed, whopper-jawed, constructionary monomaniac”, where it seems to have the meaning of somebody pugnacious, who sticks his jaw out spoiling for a fight. No doubt it was helped along by a mental association with whopper, something especially large (whose origin is not known, but which seems to be linked with wap or whop, meaning to strike a heavy blow). The lopper-jawed spelling seems to be a corruption.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    American?

    it is an informal US term that’s not that widely known and certainly doesn’t appear in many reference works. One problem in finding it is that it often goes around under an alias, appearing as wapper-jawed, whomper-jawed, whompey-jawed, whoppy-jawed or whompsey-jawed, and also seems to be related to the even rarer lopper-jawed, which the Dictionary of American Regional English records from 1916.
    But neither of the two dictionaries that list it agree with your friend’s meaning, one giving no clear definition, the other — which records it as wapperjawed — saying it means having a projecting lower jaw. So I turned to the experts on the American Dialect Society mailing list, who confirmed that the term is known and still used in the US on occasion and does indeed usually mean askew. Several subscribers to the World Wide Words newsletter have since reported that the word was familiar to them from decades ago in reference to something out of alignment or ill-made. It seems to be much less common than it once was.
    Its origin seems to be in the English dialect verb wapper, meaning to blink the eyes, or perhaps to move tremulously, which may come from the Dutch wapperen, to swing, oscillate, or waver. A more common form at one time was wapper-eyed, which variously meant to have sore eyes, or eyes that continually shifted from side to side, or were unsteady or blinked a lot.
    There’s an example from the East Anglian dialect dated 1825 in the Oxford English Dictionary that suggests it once meant a wry mouth or a warped jaw. A similar idea is in a sentence recorded from 1848: “Fancy an heir that a father had seen born well featured and fair, turning suddenly ... squint-eyed, hair-lipped, wapper-jawed” (hair here may be a misprint for hare). Taking these with all the other early examples, it seems that wapper meant something that was deformed or distorted, for which askew is as good a word as any. Quite how the more specific term wapper-jawed took on the broader sense of wapper is unknown, as there are very few examples of its use in print at any time.
    It’s easy to see that one of these could over time have evolved into the sense of having a projecting jaw. That sense is first recorded — in the Century Dictionary — in 1891, but it has also been found in a letter written by Mark Twain in December 1863: “He is a long-legged, bull-headed, whopper-jawed, constructionary monomaniac”, where it seems to have the meaning of somebody pugnacious, who sticks his jaw out spoiling for a fight. No doubt it was helped along by a mental association with whopper, something especially large (whose origin is not known, but which seems to be linked with wap or whop, meaning to strike a heavy blow). The lopper-jawed spelling seems to be a corruption.
    "whop a jawd" not a very familiar American term as I have never heard of the term....

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    not a very familiar American term as I have never heard of the term....
    well, now you have

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    "whop a jawd" not a very familiar American term as I have never heard of the term....
    First time for me as well- probably a Southern or Midwestern thing.

    Patience and a cool demeanor are the two things you need most on a build in LOS, though rage can be a valuable thing in moderation- I actually had to be restrained from strangling my contractor one sunny afternoon when he tried to explain how his feelings of 'greng jai' towards a supplier were going to cost me a couple hundred thousand baht- he got the point and I got my way.
    Last edited by FailSafe; 12-03-2012 at 09:22 AM.
    There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
    HST

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    American?

    it is an informal US term that’s not that widely known and certainly doesn’t appear in many reference works. One problem in finding it is that it often goes around under an alias, appearing as wapper-jawed, whomper-jawed, whompey-jawed, whoppy-jawed or whompsey-jawed, and also seems to be related to the even rarer lopper-jawed, which the Dictionary of American Regional English records from 1916.
    But neither of the two dictionaries that list it agree with your friend’s meaning, one giving no clear definition, the other — which records it as wapperjawed — saying it means having a projecting lower jaw. So I turned to the experts on the American Dialect Society mailing list, who confirmed that the term is known and still used in the US on occasion and does indeed usually mean askew. Several subscribers to the World Wide Words newsletter have since reported that the word was familiar to them from decades ago in reference to something out of alignment or ill-made. It seems to be much less common than it once was.
    Its origin seems to be in the English dialect verb wapper, meaning to blink the eyes, or perhaps to move tremulously, which may come from the Dutch wapperen, to swing, oscillate, or waver. A more common form at one time was wapper-eyed, which variously meant to have sore eyes, or eyes that continually shifted from side to side, or were unsteady or blinked a lot.
    There’s an example from the East Anglian dialect dated 1825 in the Oxford English Dictionary that suggests it once meant a wry mouth or a warped jaw. A similar idea is in a sentence recorded from 1848: “Fancy an heir that a father had seen born well featured and fair, turning suddenly ... squint-eyed, hair-lipped, wapper-jawed” (hair here may be a misprint for hare). Taking these with all the other early examples, it seems that wapper meant something that was deformed or distorted, for which askew is as good a word as any. Quite how the more specific term wapper-jawed took on the broader sense of wapper is unknown, as there are very few examples of its use in print at any time.
    It’s easy to see that one of these could over time have evolved into the sense of having a projecting jaw. That sense is first recorded — in the Century Dictionary — in 1891, but it has also been found in a letter written by Mark Twain in December 1863: “He is a long-legged, bull-headed, whopper-jawed, constructionary monomaniac”, where it seems to have the meaning of somebody pugnacious, who sticks his jaw out spoiling for a fight. No doubt it was helped along by a mental association with whopper, something especially large (whose origin is not known, but which seems to be linked with wap or whop, meaning to strike a heavy blow). The lopper-jawed spelling seems to be a corruption.
    "whop a jawd" not a very familiar American term as I have never heard of the term....
    You probably wouldn't if your not from the southern United States. All it simply means is that it is fucked up.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    American?

    it is an informal US term that’s not that widely known and certainly doesn’t appear in many reference works. One problem in finding it is that it often goes around under an alias, appearing as wapper-jawed, whomper-jawed, whompey-jawed, whoppy-jawed or whompsey-jawed, and also seems to be related to the even rarer lopper-jawed, which the Dictionary of American Regional English records from 1916.
    But neither of the two dictionaries that list it agree with your friend’s meaning, one giving no clear definition, the other — which records it as wapperjawed — saying it means having a projecting lower jaw. So I turned to the experts on the American Dialect Society mailing list, who confirmed that the term is known and still used in the US on occasion and does indeed usually mean askew. Several subscribers to the World Wide Words newsletter have since reported that the word was familiar to them from decades ago in reference to something out of alignment or ill-made. It seems to be much less common than it once was.
    Its origin seems to be in the English dialect verb wapper, meaning to blink the eyes, or perhaps to move tremulously, which may come from the Dutch wapperen, to swing, oscillate, or waver. A more common form at one time was wapper-eyed, which variously meant to have sore eyes, or eyes that continually shifted from side to side, or were unsteady or blinked a lot.
    There’s an example from the East Anglian dialect dated 1825 in the Oxford English Dictionary that suggests it once meant a wry mouth or a warped jaw. A similar idea is in a sentence recorded from 1848: “Fancy an heir that a father had seen born well featured and fair, turning suddenly ... squint-eyed, hair-lipped, wapper-jawed” (hair here may be a misprint for hare). Taking these with all the other early examples, it seems that wapper meant something that was deformed or distorted, for which askew is as good a word as any. Quite how the more specific term wapper-jawed took on the broader sense of wapper is unknown, as there are very few examples of its use in print at any time.
    It’s easy to see that one of these could over time have evolved into the sense of having a projecting jaw. That sense is first recorded — in the Century Dictionary — in 1891, but it has also been found in a letter written by Mark Twain in December 1863: “He is a long-legged, bull-headed, whopper-jawed, constructionary monomaniac”, where it seems to have the meaning of somebody pugnacious, who sticks his jaw out spoiling for a fight. No doubt it was helped along by a mental association with whopper, something especially large (whose origin is not known, but which seems to be linked with wap or whop, meaning to strike a heavy blow). The lopper-jawed spelling seems to be a corruption.
    Gee. Who would have thought?

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by FailSafe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    "whop a jawd" not a very familiar American term as I have never heard of the term....
    First time for me as well- probably a Southern or Midwestern thing.

    Patience and a cool demeanor are the two things you need most on a build in LOS, though rage can be a valuable thing in moderation- I actually had to be restrained from strangling my contractor one sunny afternoon when he tried to explain how his feelings of 'greng jai' towards a supplier were going to cost me a couple hundred thousand baht- he got the point and I got my way.
    The same thing happened to me on the first two contractors I had. At that time, the cross bar hotel didn't matter. I was in the kill mode.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    So similar to the UK expression "Skew-Whiff"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thetyim View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser
    Or as we say where I'm from, the door was "whop a jawd".
    So similar to the UK expression "Skew-Whiff"
    who gives a fuck,this is supposed to be a building thread you pack of cock heads.

  20. #120
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    ^ It's OK. I'll even let Aussie's post their fleeting thoughts here.

  21. #121
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    right enough!! marmers old buddy, any pics?

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    ^ It's OK. I'll even let Aussie's post their fleeting thoughts here.
    Lets hope he's fleeting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunsetter View Post
    right enough!! marmers old buddy, any pics?
    Nope. Not much else to see apart from a few more holes with steel sticking out of them.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphlsasser View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    ^ It's OK. I'll even let Aussie's post their fleeting thoughts here.
    Lets hope he's fleeting.

    Not really possible to get thoughts from aussies as our short attention span means that we don't have time to fully arti...

    Ah, beer, don't mind if I do!

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sunsetter View Post
    right enough!! marmers old buddy, any pics?
    Nope. Not much else to see apart from a few more holes with steel sticking out of them.
    Isn't that what building threads are about?

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