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Thread: Eucalyptus Home

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    Eucalyptus Home

    A few years ago, euca home were getting built, by a company based in BKK, does anyone know of anyone that has one.?

    If so whats the condition of it, after a few years.?

    In the next few months i have to decide whether to build a new home or do some renovations, to are existing house.

    We have a euca plantation with more than enough trees to build a log cabin from the lumber.

    through some research i have done, i am able to understand theres considerable shrinkage, and possible cracking of the wood, though theres a nagging feeling it will not last long.?

    Any suggestions would be gratefully accepted.

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    anonymous ant
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    A few years ago, euca home were getting built, by a company based in BKK, does anyone know of anyone that has one.?

    If so whats the condition of it, after a few years.?

    In the next few months i have to decide whether to build a new home or do some renovations, to are existing house.

    We have a euca plantation with more than enough trees to build a log cabin from the lumber.

    through some research i have done, i am able to understand theres considerable shrinkage, and possible cracking of the wood, though theres a nagging feeling it will not last long.?

    Any suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
    there are over 1000 different kinds of eucalyptus: some better than others.
    try to find the biological name for what they are using.
    if they are using the red gum, i suspect it is either cameldalensis or syderoxylon (spelling) and neither of these will give you any trouble -the syderoxylon (red ironbark), untreated ,will stand half submerged in water for over 20 years with no rotting and the insects will break their teeth trying to chomp through it.
    perniculata is another excellent one.
    the eucalyptus they grow for paper pulp (e.nitens) is useless shit and will crack and rot in no time, so check what you got growing before you waste your time.
    also, the stuff will not dry until sawn, and then it can take years to dry properly unless kiln dried, so don't waste your time.
    i assume that you are going to be using the machined "logs", and here is the thing:
    we dry timber to between 9 and 13%, but i seldom found dry timber in thailand. if the stuff is not properly dried you will get warpage and shrinkage plus cracking over time, and some subspecies are more prone to cracking than others
    now, timber in thailand, with it's naturally high humidity might not have to be dried so much-might never dry naturally to that point, so you need to do some research on that.
    either way, the slower the stuff dries, the less likely it is to crack, so thailand's high humidity is a plus.
    i used a lot of their "maidaeng" , which i think is one of the eucalyptus types and it was very good: dense as hell and you battle to get a nail through it, so this will probably do just fine.
    good luck.
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    Thanks Tsicar

    when we bought the seedlings, i asked the type of euca its was, and was told it good for wood. typical of around here.

    Through my own research now and how the trees have grown, and what they look like, i have come to the conclusion they are Cameldalensis, having sold some as well some dealers, say the trees are very strong and they keep coming back to buy them.

    Either way i am thinking that i will not make the lumber a permanent fixture, so they can be removed if and when needed, the interior will have block wall anyway, though have both interior and exterior logging/or possibly split loggging.

    if you have any ideas about seasoning them would be helpful, the local around here used to use old mtor oil.?

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    anonymous ant
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Thanks Tsicar

    when we bought the seedlings, i asked the type of euca its was, and was told it good for wood. typical of around here.

    Through my own research now and how the trees have grown, and what they look like, i have come to the conclusion they are Cameldalensis, having sold some as well some dealers, say the trees are very strong and they keep coming back to buy them.

    Either way i am thinking that i will not make the lumber a permanent fixture, so they can be removed if and when needed, the interior will have block wall anyway, though have both interior and exterior logging/or possibly split loggging.

    if you have any ideas about seasoning them would be helpful, the local around here used to use old mtor oil.?
    ANY oil is fine for ANY timber-you will have to reapply fairly regularly, so the cheapest stuff e.g. old engine oil is just fine.
    don't use varnish for exterior.
    the oil soaks in and prevents cracking, and varnish will peel as the wood expands and contracts with heat/humidity changes.

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    Eucalyptus camaldulensis is River Red Gum, if you cut it the timber should be as red as an apple. Very good firewood.

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    Thanks again

    how about a oil based wood stain would that do the same?

    Quote Originally Posted by tsicar View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Yasojack View Post
    Thanks Tsicar

    when we bought the seedlings, i asked the type of euca its was, and was told it good for wood. typical of around here.

    Through my own research now and how the trees have grown, and what they look like, i have come to the conclusion they are Cameldalensis, having sold some as well some dealers, say the trees are very strong and they keep coming back to buy them.

    Either way i am thinking that i will not make the lumber a permanent fixture, so they can be removed if and when needed, the interior will have block wall anyway, though have both interior and exterior logging/or possibly split loggging.

    if you have any ideas about seasoning them would be helpful, the local around here used to use old mtor oil.?
    ANY oil is fine for ANY timber-you will have to reapply fairly regularly, so the cheapest stuff e.g. old engine oil is just fine.
    don't use varnish for exterior.
    the oil soaks in and prevents cracking, and varnish will peel as the wood expands and contracts with heat/humidity changes.

  7. #7
    anonymous ant
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    Quote Originally Posted by palexxxx View Post
    Eucalyptus camaldulensis is River Red Gum, if you cut it the timber should be as red as an apple. Very good firewood.
    yup.
    red river or red murray.
    good stuff.

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