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  1. #651
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    Put Two Factor Authentication on lots of websites with a single app...

    https://authy.com/

  2. #652
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    A good reason to make sure your laptop has the latest firmware...

    ...the LoJax malware is unable to attack recent versions of computer firmware, meaning that if you keep your firmware updated, you’re unlikely to be a victim.
    Russian Malware That Embeds Itself Into PC Firmware Found in Wild

  3. #653
    disturbance in the Turnip
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    ^ though if you are updating your firmware via a windows software I would not be so confident

    but it seems like a good idea if you are installing an OS , flash the firmware first

  4. #654
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    "it will survive the reinstallation of an operating system or even the replacement of the computer’s hard disk".

    Where on earth does it hide ? The CPU ? The RAM ?

  5. #655
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    "it will survive the reinstallation of an operating system or even the replacement of the computer’s hard disk".

    Where on earth does it hide ? The CPU ? The RAM ?
    Firmware doesn't "hide". It's stored on Flash ROM usually.

  6. #656
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    Just for fun ...


  7. #657
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    Chinkies is nosey little fuckers...

    Super Micro shares are cheap right now though.

    A major U.S. telecommunications company discovered manipulated hardware from Super Micro Computer Inc. in its network and removed it in August, fresh evidence of tampering in China of critical technology components bound for the U.S., according to a security expert working for the telecom company.

    The security expert, Yossi Appleboum, provided documents, analysis and other evidence of the discovery following the publication of an investigative report in Bloomberg Businessweek that detailed how China’s intelligence services had ordered subcontractors to plant malicious chips in Supermicro server motherboards over a two-year period ending in 2015.

    Appleboum previously worked in the technology unit of the Israeli Army Intelligence Corps and is now co-chief executive officer of Sepio Systems in Gaithersburg, Maryland. His firm specializes in hardware security and was hired to scan several large data centers belonging to the telecommunications company. Bloomberg is not identifying the company due to Appleboum’s nondisclosure agreement with the client. Unusual communications from a Supermicro server and a subsequent physical inspection revealed an implant built into the server’s Ethernet connector, a component that's used to attach network cables to the computer, Appleboum said.

    The executive said he has seen similar manipulations of different vendors' computer hardware made by contractors in China, not just products from Supermicro. “Supermicro is a victim -- so is everyone else,” he said. Appleboum said his concern is that there are countless points in the supply chain in China where manipulations can be introduced, and deducing them can in many cases be impossible. “That's the problem with the Chinese supply chain,” he said.

    Supermicro, based in San Jose, California, gave this statement: “The security of our customers and the integrity of our products are core to our business and our company values. We take care to secure the integrity of our products throughout the manufacturing process, and supply chain security is an important topic of discussion for our industry. We still have no knowledge of any unauthorized components and have not been informed by any customer that such components have been found. We are dismayed that Bloomberg would give us only limited information, no documentation, and half a day to respond to these new allegations.”

    Bloomberg News first contacted Supermicro for comment on this story on Monday at 9:23 a.m. Eastern time and gave the company 24 hours to respond.

    Supermicro said after the earlier story that it “strongly refutes” reports that servers it sold to customers contained malicious microchips. China's embassy in Washington did not return a request for comment Monday. In response to the earlier Bloomberg Businessweek investigation, China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs didn’t directly address questions about the manipulation of Supermicro servers but said supply chain security is “an issue of common concern, and China is also a victim.”

    Supermicro shares plunged 41 percent last Thursday, the most since it became a public company in 2007, following the Bloomberg Businessweek revelations about the hacked servers. They fell as much as 27 percent on Tuesday after the latest story.

    The more recent manipulation is different from the one described in the Bloomberg Businessweek report last week, but it shares key characteristics: They’re both designed to give attackers invisible access to data on a computer network in which the server is installed; and the alterations were found to have been made at the factory as the motherboard was being produced by a Supermicro subcontractor in China.

    Based on his inspection of the device, Appleboum determined that the telecom company's server was modified at the factory where it was manufactured. He said that he was told by Western intelligence contacts that the device was made at a Supermicro subcontractor factory in Guangzhou, a port city in southeastern China. Guangzhou is 90 miles upstream from Shenzhen, dubbed the `Silicon Valley of Hardware,’ and home to giants such as Tencent Holdings Ltd. and Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.

    The tampered hardware was found in a facility that had large numbers of Supermicro servers, and the telecommunication company's technicians couldn’t answer what kind of data was pulsing through the infected one, said Appleboum, who accompanied them for a visual inspection of the machine. It's not clear if the telecommunications company contacted the FBI about the discovery. An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment on whether it was aware of the finding.

    AT&T Inc. spokesman Fletcher Cook said, “These devices are not part of our network, and we are not affected.” A Verizon Communications Inc. spokesman said “we’re not affected.”

    "Sprint does not have Supermicro equipment deployed in our network," said Lisa Belot, a Sprint spokeswoman. T-Mobile U.S. Inc. didn’t respond to requests for comment.

    Sepio Systems’ board includes Chairman Tamir Pardo, former director of the Israeli Mossad, the national defense agency of Israel, and its advisory board includes Robert Bigman, former chief information security officer of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

    U.S. communications networks are an important target of foreign intelligence agencies, because data from millions of mobile phones, computers, and other devices pass through their systems. Hardware implants are key tools used to create covert openings into those networks, perform reconnaissance and hunt for corporate intellectual property or government secrets.

    The manipulation of the Ethernet connector appeared to be similar to a method also used by the U.S. National Security Agency, details of which were leaked in 2013. In e-mails, Appleboum and his team refer to the implant as their “old friend,” because he said they had previously seen several variations in investigations of hardware made by other companies manufacturing in China.

    In Bloomberg Businessweek’s report, one official said investigators found that the Chinese infiltration through Supermicro reached almost 30 companies, including Amazon.com Inc. and Apple Inc. Both Amazon and Apple also disputed the findings. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said it has “no reason to doubt” the companies’ denials of Bloomberg Businessweek’s reporting.

    People familiar with the federal investigation into the 2014-2015 attacks say that it is being led by the FBI's cyber and counterintelligence teams, and that DHS may not have been involved. Counterintelligence investigations are among the FBI's most closely held and few officials and agencies outside of those units are briefed on the existence of those investigations.

    Appleboum said that he's consulted with intelligence agencies outside the U.S. that have told him they've been tracking the manipulation of Supermicro hardware, and the hardware of other companies, for some time.

    In response to the Bloomberg Businessweek story, the Norwegian National Security Authority said last week that it had been "aware of an issue" connected to Supermicro products since June. It couldn’t confirm the details of Bloomberg's reporting, a statement from the authority said, but it has recently been in dialogue with partners over the issue.

    Hardware manipulation is extremely difficult to detect, which is why intelligence agencies invest billions of dollars in such sabotage. The U.S. is known to have extensive programs to seed technology heading to foreign countries with spy implants, based on revelations from former CIA employee Edward Snowden. But China appears to be aggressively deploying its own versions, which take advantage of the grip the country has over global technology manufacturing.

    Three security experts who have analyzed foreign hardware implants for the U.S. Department of Defense confirmed that the way Sepio's software detected the implant is sound. One of the few ways to identify suspicious hardware is by looking at the lowest levels of network traffic. Those include not only normal network transmissions, but also analog signals -- such as power consumption -- that can indicate the presence of a covert piece of hardware.

    In the case of the telecommunications company, Sepio's technology detected that the tampered Supermicro server actually appeared on the network as two devices in one. The legitimate server was communicating one way, and the implant another, but all the traffic appeared to be coming from the same trusted server, which allowed it to pass through security filters.

    Appleboum said one key sign of the implant is that the manipulated Ethernet connector has metal sides instead of the usual plastic ones. The metal is necessary to diffuse heat from the chip hidden inside, which acts like a mini computer. "The module looks really innocent, high quality and 'original' but it was added as part of a supply chain attack," he said.

    The goal of hardware implants is to establish a covert staging area within sensitive networks, and that's what Appleboum and his team concluded in this case. They decided it represented a serious security breach, along with multiple rogue electronics also detected on the network, and alerted the client's security team in August, which then removed them for analysis. Once the implant was identified and the server removed, Sepio's team was not able to perform further analysis on the chip.

    The threat from hardware implants “is very real,” said Sean Kanuck, who until 2016 was the top cyber official inside the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. He's now director of future conflict and cyber security for the International Institute for Strategic Studies in Washington. Hardware implants can give attackers power that software attacks don’t.

    “Manufacturers that overlook this concern are ignoring a potentially serious problem,” Kanuck said. “Capable cyber actors -- like the Chinese intelligence and security services -- can access the IT supply chain at multiple points to create advanced and persistent subversions.”

    One of the keys to any successful hardware attack is altering components that have an ample power supply to them, a daunting challenge the deeper into a motherboard you go. That's why peripherals such as keyboards and mice are also perennial favorites for intelligence agencies to target, Appleboum said.

    In the wake of Bloomberg's reporting on the attack against Supermicro products, security experts say that teams around the world, from large banks and cloud computing providers to small research labs and startups, are analyzing their servers and other hardware for modifications, a stark change from normal practices. Their findings won't necessarily be made public, since hardware manipulation is typically designed to access government and corporate secrets, rather than consumer data.

    National security experts say a key problem is that, in a cybersecurity industry approaching $100 billion in revenue annually, very little of that has been spent on inspecting hardware for tampering. That's allowed intelligence agencies around the world to work relatively unimpeded, with China holding a key advantage.

    “For China, these efforts are all-encompassing,” said Tony Lawrence, CEO of VOR Technology, a Columbia, Maryland-based contractor to the intelligence community. “There is no way for us to identify the gravity or the size of these exploits -- we don't know until we find some. It could be all over the place -- it could be anything coming out of China. The unknown is what gets you and that's where we are now. We don't know the level of exploits within our own systems.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...in-u-s-telecom

  8. #658
    disturbance in the Turnip
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    If the data is traversing the server encrypted, who gives a fcuk

  9. #659
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    If the data is traversing the server encrypted, who gives a fcuk
    You'd be amazed how many people don't bother encrypting internal traffic. They think firewalls and VPNs cover it.

  10. #660
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    Had a mate on the phone this morning panicking because he'd got a Booking.com cancellation for a booking he'd never made.

    I've taught him how to spot Phishing emails but this was legit, so he phoned Booking.com and they told him the booking was made on the 9th.

    I can only assume that someone got his hotmail.com and booking.com passwords (unless they were the same, which in itself is a big NO)... AND... he'd saved his card details there.

    The most logical thing is that they were checking to see if the card worked, and deleted the original booking email, but he spotted the cancellation before they could delete it.

    So I told him to cancel his card, change the passwords (and make them unique for each system) and add 2FA on his Hotmail account (it's a piece of piss, you just use the Authenticator app on your phone as a second login credential).

    However, the important thing is that you should never, ever, ever save payment details on these sites.

    Pay.As.You.Go.

    Just sayin'.

  11. #661
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    Got a PS4? Watch out for dodgy messages.

    It seems a malicious message is making the rounds on the PlayStation Network. Reddit reports suggest PS4 owners are receiving a message that contains indecipherable characters that are causing their console to stop functioning, and requiring a factory reset to regain functionality.


    According to some users, players on in multiplayer games may send the offending message as a means of taking down an opposing team, and the best remedy may be to change your messaging settings to private so that only trusted friends can send you a message.

    Users are also being warned that the console may crash not only when you open the message but also if you receive the notification.
    One possible solution may be to access your messages via the mobile app and delete the offending message, though some users have found that to also be futile.

    This is not the first time that such an exploit has been used to crash a gadget. The mechanism of the attack seems to rely on deficiencies in the text processing ability of code; past reports indicate similar exploits by
    sending an SMS to crash a phone. There's also, of course, the famous incident from earlier this year when a Telugu character would crash various apps on the iPhone.

    Update: An earlier version of this article more ambiguously stated the message was causing consoles to be bricked. It has now been amended to clarify that this was a 'soft brick', and that the device is still recoverable via a factory reset.

  12. #662
    disturbance in the Turnip
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    haaarrrryyyyy - you should be all over this one - or are you freaking out wondering how you are going to roll out full disk encryption by tomorrow

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/1...sd_encryption/

    SSDs from crucial and samsung have been only using the Disk Encryption Key on the hardware to encrypt drives and this can be manipulated via the debugging ports and firmware
    worse still bitlocker assumes everything is good and the DEK is derived from the user password

    whoops

  13. #663
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    haaarrrryyyyy - you should be all over this one - or are you freaking out wondering how you are going to roll out full disk encryption by tomorrow

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/1...sd_encryption/

    SSDs from crucial and samsung have been only using the Disk Encryption Key on the hardware to encrypt drives and this can be manipulated via the debugging ports and firmware
    worse still bitlocker assumes everything is good and the DEK is derived from the user password

    whoops
    Since my Governance team make the Sloth out of Zootopia look like he's got ADHD, I'm actually OK with that one at the moment.

    But useful to know going forward!

  14. #664
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    You would think after the Bangladesh breach that they *might* have spent a few quid on security.

    In a shocking revelation, the head of the Federal Investigation Agency’s (FIA) cybercrime wing has said data from "almost all" Pakistani banks was stolen in a recent security breach.


    "According to a recent report we have received, data from almost all Pakistani banks has been reportedly hacked," FIA Cybercrimes Director retired Capt Mohammad Shoaib told Geo News on Tuesday.

    When pressed to clarify, the official said data from "most of the banks" operating in the country had been compromised.


    Speaking to DawnNewsTV, Shoaib said hackers based outside Pakistan had breached the security systems of several local banks. "The hackers have stolen large amounts of money from people's accounts," he added.


    "The recent attack on banks has made it quite clear that there is a need for improvement in the security system of our banks," he observed.

    He said the FIA has written to all banks, and a meeting of the banks' heads and security managements is being called. The meeting will look into ways the security infrastructure of banks can be bolstered.

    "Banks are the custodians of the money people have stored in them," Shoaib said. "They are also responsible if their security features are so weak that they result in pilferage."


    It wasn't immediately clear when exactly the security breach took place.


    According to Shoaib, more than 100 cases are being investigated by the agency in connection with the breach.


    "An element of banking fraud which is a cause of concern is that banks hide the theft [that involves them]... and the clients report [the theft] to the banks and not to us, resulting in a loss of people's money," he told DawnNewsTV.


    "We are trying to play a proactive role in preventing bank pilferage," he added.


    Shoaib said the agency has arrested many gangs involved in cybercrimes and recovered stolen money from them.


    A gang was arrested last week whose members used to disguise themselves as army officials and withdraw money from banks after gathering people's data, the official added.

    'Data of over 8,000 account holders sold'

    The disclosure comes days after around 10 banks blocked all international transactions on their cards, as concerns about a breach of credit and debit card data spread in the banking circles.

    Sources told Dawn the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) has been informed by several commercial banks that they have blocked international payments on debit and credit cards as a precautionary measure after cyber attacks on their clients’ accounts.


    According to a digital security website
    krebsonsecurity.com, data of over 8,000 account holders of about 10 Pakistani banks was sold in a market of hackers.


    A large Pakistani bank sent messages to its clients that online mobile banking services would be terminated for a temporary period from November 3 onwards on ‘technical grounds’.


    The first cyber attack was reported by BankIslami on October 27. The bank said that Rs2.6 million was stolen from international payment cards after which it has stopped such transactions and allowed biometrically verified payments only on ATM cards within Pakistan.


    Next day, the SBP issued directives to all banks to ensure that security measures on all information technology systems — including those related to card operations — are continuously updated to meet future challenges, ensure real-time monitoring of card operations related systems and transactions and immediately coordinate with all the integrated payment schemes, switch operators and media service providers.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/amp/1443970

  15. #665
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    This is hilarious. That will fucking teach the tight bastards.


    An independent researcher who was disgruntled with traditional bug bounty methods took it upon himself to leak the details of an exploit in Oracle’s Virtual Box without first informing Oracle.


    Sergey Zelenyuk discovered a flaw that would allow him to escape from the virtual environment of the guest machine to reach the Ring 3 privilege layer used for running code from most user programs with the least privileges.

    The vulnerability exists in VirtualBox 5.2.20 and prior versions.


    The bug can be leveraged on virtual machines configured with the Intel PRO/1000 MT Desktop (82540EM) network adapter in Network Address Translation (NAT) mode.


    “The E1000 has a vulnerability allowing an attacker with root/administrator privileges in a guest to escape to a host ring3.” Zelenyuk wrote in a technical write-up posted to his
    GitHub account in technical write-up. ”Then the attacker can use existing techniques to escalate privileges to ring 0 via /dev/vboxdrv.


    Zelenyuk said he likes VirtualBox and that he publicly posted the exploit in part because vendors take too long to patch their products, inconsistencies concerning which types of bugs will be compensated for, and the unclear pricing on how much researchers will be paid for their research. Oracle has yet to release and update for the flaw.


    After triggering the necessary set of conditions Zelenyuk is able to trigger an integer overflow condition and later a buffer overflow that could be abused to escape the confinements of the virtual operating system.


    Zelenyuk described the exploit as “100% reliable,” adding that “it either works always or never because of mismatched binaries or other, more subtle reasons I didn’t account.”


    Craig Young, computer security researcher at Tripwire, said the vulnerability is in the implementation of a virtual Intel E1000 compatible network adapter.


    “The write-up demonstrates how an attacker with permissions to load Linux kernel modules in a Virtual Box guest environment can achieve low-privileged code execution on the host OS which can then be elevated to gain administrative access to the host,” Young said. “Anyone using Virtual Box for accessing untrusted content (malware analysts for example) should immediately review their machine profiles and at least temporarily discontinue use of the E1000 device in favor of the PCNET adapter.”


    Young added that users should avoid running any less than trustworthy applications in any Virtual Box environment with E1000 enabled until Oracle is able to release a fix.

    https://www.scmagazine.com/home/secu...ed-researcher/

  16. #666
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    Researchers at cybersecurity company ESET have found a malware campaign that compromises device’s firmware component. The campaign is believed to be supported and spread by Kremlin-backed group Fancy Bear.

    According to the report, the malware is dubbed LoJax, and is capable enough to “serve as a key to the whole computer” by infecting the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) of a device. It is very hard to detect, and can also survive the operating system (OS) reinstallations.

    “The way that LoJax accesses both the UEFI and LoJack is by using binary files that, from the operating system, compile information about its hardware,” Panda Security researchers said in a blog.

    “LoJax isn’t dangerous simply because of the infection of the UEFI itself, but also due to the fact that many cybersecurity solutions, including corporate cybersecurity solutions that are present in many companies, completely overlook Computrace LoJack and the UEFI software, as the classify it to be safe.”

    LoJack is an anti-theft software, which is most commonly known for its cyber attack on the Democratic National Committee in 2016, as well as several other attacks on European organizations.

    “Although we were aware in theory that UEFI rootkits existed, our discovery confirms that they are used by an active advanced persistent threat group,” said ESET researcher Jean-Ian Boutin, in a press release.

    “These attacks targeting the UEFI are a real threat, and anyone in the crosshairs of Sednit [Fancy Bear] should be watching their networks and devices very closely.”

    'LoJax' malware can survive operating system reinstallations - E Hacking News


  17. #667
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    Months after announcing its privacy-focused DNS service, Cloudflare is bringing 1.1.1.1 to mobile users.


    Granted, nothing ever stopped anyone from using 1.1.1.1 on their phones or tablets already. But now the app, now available for iPhones, iPads and Android devices, aims to make it easier for anyone to use its free consumer DNS service.

    The app is a one-button push to switch on and off again. That’s it.


    Cloudflare rolled out 1.1.1.1
    earlier this year on April Fools’ Day, no less, but privacy is no joke to the San Francisco-based networking giant. In using the service, you let Cloudflare handle all of your DNS information, like when an app on your phone tries to connect to the internet, or you type in the web address of any site. By funneling that DNS data through 1.1.1.1, it can make it more difficult for your internet provider to know which sites you’re visiting, and also ensure that you can get to the site you want without having your connection censored or hijacked.

    It’s not a panacea to perfect privacy, mind you — but it’s better than nothing.


    The service is
    also blazing fast, shaving valuable seconds off page loading times — particularly in parts of the world where things work, well, a little slower.

    “We launched 1.1.1.1 to offer consumers everywhere a better choice for fast and private Internet browsing,” said Matthew Prince, Cloudflare chief executive said. “The 1.1.1.1 app makes it even easier for users to unlock fast and encrypted DNS on their phones.”


    You can download the app from
    Apple’s App Store and Google Play.

    https://techcrunch.com/2018/11/11/cloudflare-privacy-dns-service-ios-android/

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