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  1. #1
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    Thailand House Build

    Well this house build is actually in Pattaya near my land, about a year ago they added about 40cm of topsoil to raise the land, a lot of that washed away during the rainy season, and a couple of weeks ago they started the build.

    The land area is around 20 meters by 20 meters, ie 100 farang wai, maybe slightly bigger, the only problem I can see is there won't be a garden, they have left about 1 meter down the sides and 2 meters at the front, no off road parking here as the soi is too narrow so the parking bay must be part of the house.

    The land with the holes dug for the footings.



    You can see they used a digger and didn't dig out by hand, got to admit on seeing those holes I thought it was going to be a block of 3 story shop houses, as this is a dead on Soi with the maximum potential of another 5 houses being built and only 1 there at the moment it wouldn't be a good place to open a business.



    Anyway I caught them working today, it's going to be a single story house, but a big one, think there is about 25 posts so thats going to be a lot of rooms.



    The footings supported on breeze block, pretty big area for a single story house, got to assume the soil is soft here, you can see the 3 by 3 by 3 breeze blocks that have been used for the form work, each breeze block is 40cm by 20 cm so the footing will be 120cm by 120cm.



    Little spindly posts using 12mm steel for the uprights, they are going to look pretty ugly once the building is complete, still, it is a Thai area.



    Completion is estimated at 3 and 1/2 months, doubt they have taken into account Songkran in April in about 2 and 1/2 months, still we shall see if they complete in time.

  2. #2
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog
    Little spindly posts using 12mm steel for the uprights, they are going to look pretty ugly once the building is complete
    Ugly and not very sturdy. Upright size about right for a wall. Hope they aren't planning much weight for roof materials.

  3. #3
    euston has flown

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    stupid question, but I'm not a builder

    assuming that they leave the breeze blocks holding the rebar above the ground in place when they poor the concrete, isn't water going to get in a rust the rebar rather quickly? would this weaken the foundations? shouldn't they be using concrete supports to hold the rebar above the ground?

  4. #4
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    Structurally it won't make much difference as the footing is real big, although personally I wouldn't do it like that, rather have it held up by rebar rather than blocks taking up such a large area. Underneath the blocks is a thin layer of non reinforced concrete which is what the block form work is attached to.

  5. #5
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    Looks like theyre building on good solid ground ( not )

  6. #6
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    No Thai Builders

    Went past the site today, not a Thai workman in sight, hmmm, 3 1/2 months to finish, well not a good start, anyway it seems I under estimated the size of the building, it is 5 posts across and 9 posts deep, thats like the building will be 30 odd meters by 17 plus meters, pretty damn big.

    This first photo shows how close it is to the left hand side wall, they aren't going to have much of a view on that side.



    A picture from the left hand side showing the rest of the building plot.


  7. #7
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    The columns 4m spaced? They look much less.

  8. #8
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    I think 3.5 or slightly more, don't forget those holes are like 1.5 x 1.5 meters each.

  9. #9
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    I am just at the same stage with my build. I am on virgin soil, no fill at all and we went down 1.2 meters. My posts are all 16mm rebar and more steel at that. The ones in the pictures shown are very cheap charlie build.

  10. #10
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    ^I assume your going 2 stories though?

  11. #11
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    dirtydog
    In your Op you reckoned that the land was 20m x 20m and then you estimate that the building is about 30m x 17m are they trying to fit a a square peg in a round hole?

  12. #12
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    looks like they are building a single level block of rental bungalows

  13. #13
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    Short time hotel for walk ins?

  14. #14
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    .

    ^Won't be successful. No space for curtained parking spots.

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    ^ If it's a bit lowso around DD's area, maybe they'll just have slots for motocycs...

  16. #16
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    ^I assume your going 2 stories though?
    Single story and actually the architect specified 20mm rebar but my builder said that was overkill and 16 was sufficient.

  17. #17
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    You don't need 20mm rebar on a bungalow, I assume you kept hassling him about you wanting the house to be strong, if he suggested it himself he shouldn't be doing house plans.

  18. #18
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    I didn't hassle him at all and the specs came from a certified structural engineer....... I agree it is a bit of overkill, but I would much sooner more than less.

  19. #19
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    Speaking about rebar, what's the concensus on what is referred to as morgor (spelling) rebar? I am told by my building supply company that there are basically 3 grades of rebar available and it all has to do with how much it weighs per length. The building supply said that morgor is only used on government or large condos/hotel projects. Virtually everyone uses the mid grade for residential construction.

    Comments?

  20. #20
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    Do you mean the oily one with ridges? I've only ever used it on buildings 3 stories or more, wouldn't bother using it on a bungalow.

  21. #21
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    Thailand House Build

    Well all the footings have been poured and they are now doing the concrete posts, seem to be saving on wood by doing a 1/3rd at a time, here's a post with formwork in place.



    They seem to be straightening up the corners, not sure why as most of the post will be hidden in the dirt, maybe someone practising perhaps, also they are all at this strange height, ie around 30cms above what the ground level will be, perhaps the building is going to be raised off of the ground?



    And another view from the far left handside of the land.


  22. #22
    Member Tubtaywun's Avatar
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    I have read ....everywhere... that when pouring concrete you pour in one go, with as few wet on dry joins as possible....if any.

    How important is that?

    Where is the best place to join? If i poured my concrete floor and it dries then pour my posts there would be a join at the base of each post.

    I know a good bit about building homes, but never used concrete as the load bearing structure...I could have done with some experience with concrete before I start my house.
    Sometimes I lie awake at night, and I ask, 'Where have I gone wrong?' Then a voice says to me, 'This is going to take more than one night.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by acudlipp
    If i poured my concrete floor and it dries then pour my posts there would be a join at the base of each post.
    Footings, beams, posts, brickwork, render, floor is the general order.

  24. #24
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    I have read ....everywhere... that when pouring concrete you pour in one go, with as few wet on dry joins as possible....if any.

    How important is that?
    This is what's referred to as a "cold joint". It is very important when pouring a horizontal load bearing beam or a floor slab as this will be a weak point. On a vertical load such as the main posts it is not so important. Concrete (properly mixed) is extremely strong in compression, not so much in tension, hence the requirement for rebar in any situation that the concrete may be subjected to tension (pulling) or bending loads.
    Last edited by CDNinKS; 01-02-2011 at 06:49 AM.

  25. #25
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    Footings, beams, posts, brickwork, render, floor is the general order.
    Should be: Footings, beams, posts, floor is the general order. Brickwork and render come after the floor, especially in a 2 story house ;-)

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