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  1. #101
    Thailand Expat
    SEA Traveler's Avatar
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    going back through my photos, I could not come up with a response to the question with 100% confidence. From what I can recall, the wood timber posts were placed on a concrete base under the ground and then cement poured around the wood timber columns up to the level where the cement floor was poured.
    "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff....and it is all small stuff"

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    From what I can recall, the wood timber posts were placed on a concrete base under the ground and then cement poured around the wood timber columns up to the level where the cement floor was poured
    that would lead to the problem of water getting trapped around the base of the posts, not a good idea

    doubtful if they did that

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    most of this 'craftsmanship' is done by machine and is the same design all over Thailand
    agreed

    you can still find panels actually carved by hand although very expensive by comparison

    when we built our last house, we took all our hand-carved panels (84) from our other house and transferred them over to make the balcony surrounds

    they are really nice to look at and worth the bother
    I have reported your post

  4. #104
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    When I see pics of a house like this with all the Thai ( HARD AND SHARP ) edged wood furniture in it ,, then instantly it reminds me how bloody uncomfortable it is ,, well for me that is anyway. I have to suffer this kind of thing in the family home in Issan , each to their own but I won't be having that in our home
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAndy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SEA Traveler
    From what I can recall, the wood timber posts were placed on a concrete base under the ground and then cement poured around the wood timber columns up to the level where the cement floor was poured
    that would lead to the problem of water getting trapped around the base of the posts, not a good idea

    doubtful if they did that

    the wood timbers are clearly in the concrete and not attached at the surface of the concrete. better that they be placed on a foundation rather then on dirt. may not be the recommended way and not my place so no input... so what way is it that you think it should have been done Andy?

  6. #106
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    Thanks for the update photos.

    Real quality in the finish. The wall panel to posts especially. They really compliment each other.

    Lots of twiddly bits but they all compliment each other. As someone has said a museum piece which will be visited for the architecture as well as location and service. The lower area is my only issues as I think its a little low - maybe the Chinese/Japanese market?.

    Well done the owner and architect.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  7. #107
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    ^Forgot to add the builder and his carpenters.

  8. #108
    Member Koetjeka's Avatar
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    This house is just so very beautiful, you can see it has been made by great crafters (and a very good designer). The finish is very nice as well. I myself plan to build something partly similar (different inside) and got some new idea's from your house.

    I hope you don't mind me asking how much this has costed you? If you don't want to share it, I'll respect that of course.

  9. #109
    Member Koetjeka's Avatar
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    Sorry I couldn't find the edit button, I thought this was the house of one of the forum members but I just read the actual text 20m bath seems like a very high price to me.

    It's still very awesome though

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by canopy View Post
    Just noticed this thread. I think using those trees for posts will look great and natural and is something that is extremely rare this day in age. It's a real shame though they ruined the bottom level by making it that low. Even if one can clear it or duck it will at best be claustrophobic even sitting down. Think MBK where they sell the phones. Probably best way to salvage it is to close it up and make it a storage room.

    I have some experience with bamboo rebar so peaked my interest to see what they are doing there. Sadly, many mistakes were made in this regard and this is the kind of thing that gives bamboo a bad name unnecessarily:

    -For many reasons, bamboo should never be less than 2" (5cm) from the bottom. In this case laying it flat on the ground is simply ridiculous. It won't do much of anything there and will quickly rot and disappear.

    -Bamboo can achieve the same reinforcement strength as steel. But to get sufficient strength there needs to be a lot more of it. In this case the bamboo spacing is too wide and thus too weak for this slab.

    -Except under special circumstances bamboo rebar needs a coating. When concrete is poured over it, bamboo will absorb water and slowly expand as the concrete sets. This can damage and crack concrete. Then it will slowly dry and shrink back leaving loose, weak joints in weakened concrete.

    -I can't tell for sure from the photos but it appears the slab is too thin for bamboo usage which has a minimum depth where it becomes effective.

    One thing they did get right is using splints of that size. Well overall since they just laid bamboo on the floor it probably is about the same as doing nothing at all so no harm I suppose, just a waste of time and false sense that it is doing something.
    What kind of coating would you recommend for bamboo rebar (considering what's available in Thailand)?

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