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  1. #101
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    And my favourite spot in the house - my own reading corner, gets the early morning sun, the best breeze in the house and overlooks the mature mango trees (which you can't see in this pic but are just around the corner of the house).

  2. #102
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    ^
    Nice.
    Looks like my teakwood house in the garden (minus the mango trees)


  3. #103
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    Absolutely fantastic and beautiful home you are building! My budget did not allow me to do like this, but I hope in the future to make a teakwood guesthouse or at least a relax shed in the backyard beside the pond we plan to make. I love teakwood buildings. Keep up the good work and I look forward to follow progress of your building

    - mai pen rai cos TIT

  4. #104
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    Very nice build......congratulations! you must be pleased with the result.

    Cheers

  5. #105
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    Nice to see that.

    Thanks for sharing

  6. #106
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    loved the thread and i alwyas wanted on like it in the garden. i will be looking into a smal one bedroom guest type teak in the future.

  7. #107
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    Very nice; good thread and lovely house.

    One ignorant question: why so high off the ground; looks to be 15-20 feet or so, would 7-10 feet be enough?

  8. #108
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    is the toilet/shower to be downstairs ?

  9. #109
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    Thanks for the feedback. We are starting the downstairs tiling next week and should finish off staining the wood as well, right now only the outdoor stairs are done.
    Bettyboo the house is 3m off the ground, mostly to try and catch a breeze. It's amazing how there is often no movement at ground level but 3m up we have a steady breeze all the time. No sweat to be in our house even in the hottest hours, provided the windows facing the sun are closed and the other three sides are opened. Life is MUCH more comfortable than for my father-in-law who has a tin roof on his place down the track.
    Baldrick - right now we share with father in law, we will build something in a few months once rice season is over. We live in Bangkok so this is only our holiday place and the kitchen will probably constitute a BBQ and an esky for beer and wine! The outhouse and kitchen will be off to one side as we don't want to block off too much of our space downstairs, it's not very big and I need a lot of swinging room for my hammock!

  10. #110
    Member Tubtaywun's Avatar
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    Nice,

    Is it economically viable to do large houses in this old style?

    Anyone know how it would compare to a concrete/block/brick build?

  11. #111
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    ^It depends on what style and where you live? You can buy houses between 150,000 to 500,000 depending on what wood and how good it is as well as how much. There are many Thai's that buy 4 houses and put them together to create a complex of buildings.

    Then you have to add on labour which is not expensive and materials ie nails, glue, extra wood for broken bits, new wood for bits not there....etc.

    On the whole you might find concrete less hassle, but wood is far more satisfying to live in.

    What you need is a professional wood builder because it is down to him how your house will end up!
    im hot its so hot today.......milk was a bad choice!

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twocam
    the house is 3m off the ground, mostly to try and catch a breeze. It's amazing how there is often no movement at ground level but 3m up we have a steady breeze all the time. No sweat to be in our house even in the hottest hours, provided the windows facing the sun are closed and the other three sides are opened.
    Excellent, thanks.

  13. #113
    Member Tubtaywun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benlovesnuk View Post
    ^It depends on what style and where you live? You can buy houses between 150,000 to 500,000 depending on what wood and how good it is as well as how much. There are many Thai's that buy 4 houses and put them together to create a complex of buildings.

    Then you have to add on labour which is not expensive and materials ie nails, glue, extra wood for broken bits, new wood for bits not there....etc.

    On the whole you might find concrete less hassle, but wood is far more satisfying to live in.

    What you need is a professional wood builder because it is down to him how your house will end up!
    Hey thanks for that,

    I like the sound of being able to build the house in modules.... is this the thai version of prefab...

    A few questions ...
    Are these new or old houses?
    Can they be made secure? ....as in theft
    There must be a lot more upkeep in a wooden house ...so what are the good points that make it more satisfying?

  14. #114
    Thailand Expat ossierob's Avatar
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    Good onya 2cam....all the best...I will follow your posts

  15. #115
    Thailand Expat ossierob's Avatar
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    Sorry I got stuck on page 1 ....now I have read the lot and love the look of the place. Congratulations 2cam it looks great...I also am looking for a bit of a holiday shack made from timber. Have read a few posts on here now about building or reconstructing them and the more I see the more I love em.
    Just a Member number

  16. #116
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    Very beautiful home.

    Why did you use steel roof structure instead of timber?

  17. #117
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    In post 100 you have "ventilation" gaps between the top of the walls and the underside of the roof, have you managed to fill the gaps with anything yet. if so have you photographs?

  18. #118
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    Wow, it's woderful, I like wooden house, but why don't you choose the bamboo? I think it's more attractive than wood, it will make the whole house looks great!

  19. #119
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    thanks for sharing your house with us,,beautiful...

  20. #120
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    We finally sat down and tallied the finances. For the basic house (no bathroom, no kitchen -currently sharing both with father-in-law next door) we came in at a smidge over THB700,000 which was 100,000 over our initial estimate. Two reasons: the steady rise in building materials from the time we started our plans 3 years ago to building this year, secondly the few "extras" that we threw in along the way, like the carved teak panel above the front door and the metal roof beams instead of using our own home-grown wood.

    Ohoh we used a metal beam structure in the roof because of the sheer weight of the traditional tiles when they are wet. We could have cut more trees for the frame but we had to leave some trees for other family members

    We haven't filled the ventilation gaps and it's probably the only thing I'm really unhappy with. I wanted some metal mesh attached but partner didn't like the look. I'm interested to see what animals have crawled in - we will be back up there in a few weeks to check. I'll bet my bottom dollar that my man will be up in that ventilation space nailing in some protection pretty quick smart.

  21. #121
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    ^
    Thanks for the answers. If you do fill them in I would be interested in the construction/result.

    Are there many houses in your location with the tiled/high roof? Most village houses I have seen are sheet roofing with a flatter roof angle. Probably a more economic build but less imposing.

  22. #122
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    No others in the vicinity with the same style roof as it's not really Isaan style. Our place has turned into quite the local attraction. It's 45 mins from Nong Khai though, so a bit far for mass tourism

  23. #123
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    Amazing house. How much more would it have cost if you had to buy all of the wood? Also, how much extra do you think the toilet/kitchen is going to cost to build - the other model building squashed up against the main building I take it?

  24. #124
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    SciFly I reckon we could have done it for just over a million baht if we had to buy a secondhand house to pulldown for the wood (they run about 300k in our area if you can find one). The labour to pull a secondhand place apart and move it is pretty minimal.
    We are doing a concrete kitchen/bathroom construction off to one side for THB 20,000 but that won't be our long-term plan, we just want something to use over the next couple of years, by then the district might have extended the electricity out our way. The quote for the tiling downstairs seems like a bloody killer though - nearly 30,000 baht for 54sq.m. and we already own the tiles! I'm not an expert but to me that sounds expensive?

  25. #125
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    When had some tiles laid last year, I supplied all the materials and the labour was 85 baht per square meter (I think) the total area was 95 square meters and the tiles were roughly 22.5 cm by 22.5 cm. So I think you are paying way over the top unless you have special tiles or many small areas to be tiled.

    Cheers Johpam

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