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    Italian reporter killed in Bangkok clashes

    Italian reporter killed in Bangkok clashes


    Italian media have named as Fabio Polenghi as the photo-journliast shot and killed in clashes Wednesday between Thai troops and demonstrators in Bangkok.

    The reporter was identified by a friend from television images as Polenghi, the ANSA newsagency reported.

    The 45-year-old Milan-based Polenghi was reportedly in Thailand on assignment for several magazines. //DPA

    The Nation


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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveCM View Post
    Italian Photographer's Death Probed: Thai Army Alleged to Have Targeted Journalists in 2010 Protests - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

    11/05/2011

    Italian Photographer's Death Probed

    Thai Army Alleged to Have Targeted Journalists in 2010 Protests

    AFP A portrait of slain Italian photograher Fabio Polenghi is displayed at his funeral at a temple in Bangkok in May 2010.

    Fabio Polenghi, the Italian news photographer killed in Bangkok in May 2010 during the so-called Red-Shirt protests, was shot in the back, an autopsy has confirmed. His sister Elisabetta and a Canadian lawyer believe he was killed by an army bullet and say they have witness testimony that soldiers were ordered to fire on journalists.

    An autopsy of Italian photojournalist Fabio Polenghi, who was killed in Bangkok on May 19, 2010 during the so-called Red-Shirt protests against the Democrat Party-led government, has confirmed suspicions that he was shot in the back.

    Polenghi, a regular contributor to SPIEGEL, was shot as he ran from advancing soldiers. His sister, Elisabetta Polenghi, says she is certain it was an army bullet that killed him by tearing through his heart, lung and liver. Enlisting the help of the Canadian lawyer Robert Amsterdam, she has been trying to determine the exact circumstances of her brother's death in Bangkok.

    Orders to Target Journalists

    "We have statements from witnesses in the army who say there were orders to specifically target journalists," Amsterdam says.

    There were allegedly also orders to confiscate any press materials. As Polenghi lay dying, his camera was stolen from him. The scene was captured by other photographers present. Amsterdam is demanding that police investigate the case.

    Newly uncovered documents show that the orders to fight the mostly unarmed opposition protesters came from military leaders and politicians.

    On that fateful day in May, the papers reveal, the army leadership ordered that snipers be stationed on "all the tall buildings around Lumphini Park." The "use of weapons to protect oneself and maintain the peace" was also explicitly permitted. The corresponding orders bear the signature not only of then-army chief Anupong Paochinda, but also of the deputy prime minister at the time.

    SPIEGEL
    cross posted for reference .

  3. #3
    ความสุขในอีสาน
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    ^ Blimey I know the clocks have gone back this week , but this is a bit exteme !

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    Tragic story. RIP

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    Quote Originally Posted by StrontiumDog View Post
    Thai soldiers shot Italian photographer, say police - Channel NewsAsia

    Thai soldiers shot Italian photographer, say police

    Posted: 23 July 2012 1818 hrs


    "Red Shirt" anti-government protesters attend a rally in Bangkok (file picture)

    BANGKOK: Government soldiers are believed to have shot an Italian photographer who was killed during mass opposition street protests in 2010 in Bangkok, police told an official inquest in Thailand on Monday.

    Police Colonel Suebsak Pansura, who is heading a team investigating the case, said they had questioned 47 witnesses and experts over the death of Fabio Polenghi and gathered evidence to submit to prosecutors.

    "The conclusion found that the cause of his death was believed to have been a gunshot from the authorities on duty," he told Bangkok's Criminal Court on the opening day of the inquest.

    Polenghi was shot and killed on May 19 2010, the day when soldiers firing live ammunition stormed the anti-government "Red Shirt" protest movement's sprawling rally base in the centre of Bangkok.

    Police could not find the bullet which fatally wounded him in the heart, but experts said he was shot by a high-velocity gun. The inquest will attempt to ascertain who was responsible.

    Polenghi, 48, was working as a freelance photographer covering the protests in which tens of thousands of Red Shirts brought central Bangkok to a standstill for two months with demands for snap elections.

    Street battles between soldiers with rifles and mostly unarmed protesters claimed more than 90 lives and left nearly 1,900 people injured, mainly civilians.

    The kingdom, which remains deeply divided by the bloodshed, now has a new government allied to the Red Shirts' hero, fugitive former leader Thaksin Shinawatra, whose sister Yingluck is prime minister.

    No soldiers or officials have been prosecuted in connection with the deaths during the unrest, prompting anger from relatives and rights groups, who say those responsible are being protected by a culture of impunity in Thailand.

    Yingluck's government said in November there was clear evidence that soldiers were responsible for the death of another journalist during the unrest, Japanese cameraman Hiroyuki Muramoto of the Thomson Reuters news agency.

    - AFP/de
    http://teakdoor.com/thailand-and-asi...ml#post2167118 (Exclusive: Probe reveals Thai troops' role in civilian deaths)

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    First hearing of inquest into Fabio’s death
    Tue, 24/07/2012

    On 23 July, the Southern Bangkok Criminal Court held the first hearing in the inquest into the death of the Italian photo-journalist Fabio Polenghi who was killed during the government crackdown on red shirts in May 2010.

    Pol Col Suebsak Phansura, Deputy Commander of Metropolitan Police 6 and the chief investigator in Fabio’s case, testified that Fabio’s death was likely to have been caused by the action of military troops, who fired high-velocity bullets on a horizontal trajectory at reporters and demonstrators on 19 May 2010.

    He said that since late last year when the Department of Special Investigation included Fabio’s case among 16 cases of people who were believed to have been killed by military troops during the political unrest, he had been assigned to head a team to investigate the case, and had examined evidence provided by the DSI and Pathumwan Police Station.

    He found that Fabio was killed during the day time on 19 May 2010 near Ratchadamri intersection when he was covering the event. At that time, military troops were heading toward the intersection and intermittently firing at the demonstrators, he said.

    Asked by a judge whether the troops were firing into the air or horizontally, Pol Col Suebsak said, ‘horizontally.’

    Fabio was killed while he was running to dodge bullets and taking photographs at the same time. Turning his back on the armed troops, he was hit in the back by a bullet which went through his left chest. He was taken by red shirts on a motorcycle to the Police Hospital, and subsequently died, he said.

    According to the police officer, during the government crackdown under the command of the Centre for the Resolution of Emergency Situation, 300 troops from the 3rd Cavalry Battalion (Royal Guard) were deployed at Ratchaprasong and Ratchadamri areas.

    He said that on that day the cavalry troops were taking control in the area, using armoured vehicles and equipped with HK33 rifles, shotguns and pistols with rubber, blank and live ammunition and hand-thrown tear gas grenades.

    His assumption that Fabio was likely to have been killed by the troops has been derived from the interrogation of 47 witnesses, forensic evidence, photographs and video clips provided by foreign reporters.

    He, however, could not identify the type of bullet which killed the journalist, as it passed through the body, but he believed that it was a high-velocity bullet, judging from ‘the fact that it pierced the body and the nature of the wound’.

    Fabio’s younger sister Elisabetta, who also testified in court, told Prachatai that she had a little more hope after seeing the progress in the justice process.

    She said that she did not wish to see the culprits sent to prison, but only wanted to know the truth.

    She is visiting Thailand for the 6th time to follow the case of her brother’s death.

    prachatai.com




    Published on 23 Jul 2012 by prachatai

    สัมภาษณ์เอลิซาเบตตา โปเลนกี น้องสาวของฟาบิโอ โปเลนกี ช่างภาพอิตาลีซึ่งเสียชีวิตช่วงสลายการชุมนุม 19 พ.ค. 53 ที่ราชดำริ โดยเป็นการขึ้นศาลเพื่อไต่สวนการตายของฟาบิโอ โปเลนกีนัดแรก

    Elisabetta Polenghi, younger sister of Italian photographer Fabio Polenghi gave an interview for Prachatai as an inquest began this Monday into the death of her brother, Fabio Polenghi who was killed as troops forcibly suppressed an anti-government protest in Bangkok in 2010.

    Elisabetta has visited Thailand 6 times already since her brother's death to try to persue her brother's case into Thailand court. The inquest will begin on 17 September with hearing from 36 witnesses in all and may take many months to reach a verdict.


    youtube.com

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    Fabio Polenghis last photos on exhibition
    Sat, 18/05/2013

    Some of the last photographs taken by photo-journalist Fabio Polenghi, who was shot and killed on 19 May 2010 in Bangkok during the government crackdown on red-shirt protests, have been put on exhibition by his sister.

    The court will deliver its verdict on the inquest into his death on 29 May.

    On 18 May, Elisabetta Polenghi opened an exhibition of her brothers photographs at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Thailand.


    Elisabetta Polenghi at the exhibition

    This is to commemorate the last moments of Fabios life and his goodwill towards his fellow humans and justice through the photographs he had taken telling stories amidst conflicts, she said.

    In addition to those of the violent incidents in Thailand in 2010, photographs about communities in Brazil and refugees in Myanmar were also shown.

    Elisabetta said that it had taken her about a year to collect over 500 of Fabios photos and about another 4 months to select 30 to be shown on the exhibition.

    Fabios last photo from his computer, taken on 18 May 2010.

    She said that choosing the photos for exhibition was very difficult because it was like living his life and understanding his last moments before he was shot, as she had not been with him at that moment.

    The South Bangkok Criminal Court has been conducting an inquest into Fabios death for over a year, and is expected to deliver its verdict at the end of this month.

    From the trial and evidence, it can be said that the bullets that killed her brother came from the direction of military troops, she said. She believed that the court would make the right decision.

    She said that the Thai justice system was quicker than she had thought. Initially, she believed that her brothers case might never reach the courts at all.

    Although it was hard for her to take each step on the way, she did not expect or wish the killers to be executed or punished. She just wanted the truth to come out, she said.

    The exhibition will be on display at the FCCT in Ploenchit, Bangkok, until 30 May.

    Fabios camera was stolen by an unidentified man right after he was shot. See Who is this man?





    Source: เปิดแสดง '[at]าพสุดท้าย' ข[at]ง 'ฟาบิโ[at] โปเลนกี' ก่[at]นถูกยิงในเหตุการ ์พ.ค. 53 | ประชาไท

    prachatai.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post

    Thai court rules troops responsible for Italian reporter's death
    Amy Sawitta Lefevre
    Reuters 4 hours ago

    BANGKOK (Reuters) - An Italian photo-journalist who was shot dead in Bangkok while taking pictures of a military crackdown on an anti-government protest in 2010 was killed by a bullet fired by a soldier, a Thai court ruled on Wednesday.

    Fabio Polenghi, 48, was killed on the morning of May 19 when troops moved in to disperse "red shirt" supporters of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, who had been camped in the centre of the capital for weeks, demanding an early election.

    "The court ruled that orders given by Prime Minister Abhisit and Deputy Prime Minister Suthep that day led to Fabio's death," Karom Ponthaklang, a lawyer for the journalist's family, told reporters.

    "It is clear from the evidence that the bullet used was the kind used by Thai troops. We are satisfied with the verdict."

    He added that he would ask the Department of Special Investigations, part of the Justice Ministry, to press charges against Abhisit Vejjajiva and Suthep Thaugsuban.

    Abhisit is now leader of the opposition and the government is led by Thaksin's sister, Yingluck Shinawatra, who won an election in July 2011.

    Elisabetta Polenghi, one of Fabio's sisters, told reporters that those ultimately found responsible for his death should be "at least the person leading the operation on the ground".

    The ruling could spell further trouble for Abhisit and Suthep, who were charged last year with giving orders to use live ammunition that led to civilian deaths and have a number of similar cases pending against them.

    If found guilty, they could face the death penalty or life in prison. Abhisit has defended his order to use live ammunition, saying the protesters' refusal to negotiate had left his government with few options.

    Suthep headed the Centre for the Resolution of the Emergency Situation, a crisis control centre that authorised "live fire" zones during the protest and used emergency powers to shut down radio stations, a television station and websites.

    More than 90 people, including two journalists and members of the security forces, died during the two months of unrest in the Thai capital. Reuters cameraman Hiroyuki Muramoto, 43, was killed by a high velocity bullet to his chest during clashes between government troops and protesters on April 10.

    A Truth for Reconciliation Commission set up by Abhisit's government to investigate the clashes released a report last year that laid blame for the deaths on the military and on a shadowy group of gunmen dressed in black who mingled with the protesters and fired at troops. They were presumed to be on the side of the protesters.

    The Thai military has a long history of intervention in politics and ousted Thaksin in a 2006 coup. The populist billionaire, who retains strong support and political influence, has been living in self-imposed since being sentenced to a prison term for graft. (Additional reporting by Aukkarapon Niyomyat; Editing by Alan Raybould and Robert Birsel)

    Thai court rules troops responsible for Italian reporter's death
    .....

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    Army Denies Shooting At Fabio Polenghi
    31 May 2013

    (30 May) The Royal Thai Army again insisted it had no role in the death of Fabio Polenghi, the Italian photographer who was killed in central Bangkok as the military launched the final assault on Redshirts protesters on 19 May 2010.

    The army was responding to the court inquest which ruled earlier this week that Mr. Polenghi was slain by military-issued bullet fired from the direction of the security forces, citing witnesses and other forensic investigations. The inquest was the first official act which linked the military′s role to death of Mr. Polenghi, after 3 years of silence and denial.

    But today, Col. Wintai Suwaree, spokesman of the Royal Thai Army, said in press conference that the bullet may have been fired from the military position at the time, but the security forces had not taken control of all highrise buildings in the area, suggesting that Mr. Fabio might have been killed by unknown militants who took shelter in such buildings.

    However, Col. Wintai′s remark contradicts with the court inquest which indicated that no other armed elements are believed to be involved in Mr. Polenghi′s death.

    Col. Wintai also said that the military had not fired their weapons around the time of Mr. Polenghi′s death. As for numerous videos suggesting otherwise, Col. Wintai dismissed them as propaganda "spread by ill-intentioned people" who want to defame the military.

    "The footage only show events in which the personnel exchanged fire with armed militants who obstruct our operation in the area. This happened long after Fabio′s death," the spokesman said.

    khaosod.co.th

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