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  1. #51
    Mid
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    Amphorn Jarujinda, a former chief police coroner, will answer questions on how he concluded, based on autopsy photos, that Hiroyuki Muramoto, who worked for Reuters, was killed by a single bullet from a AK47 assault rifle at Khok Wua Intersection last year.

    snip

    Tharit Phengdit, DSI directorgeneral, said it was police investigators who were working on the case based on the hypothesis that AK47 bullets were used.

    The DSI had no responsibility to counter a statement by the Pheu Thai Party, which supports and funds the activities and protests of the redshirt movement, that AK47 rifles were secondary weapons and used by certain Army units, he said.


    Police coroner to explain today why cameraman was shot by AK47 bullet

    nice to see the DSI director general displaying neutrality

  2. #52
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    Gen Prayuth said in an interview that the death of Muramoto needed further investigation to find out who fired the AK-47 bullet that hit, and from where.

    Bangkok Post : DSI accused of distorting facts


    notice how the good General dismisses any doubt that it was an AK47
    Last edited by Mid; 01-03-2011 at 04:35 PM. Reason: fixed link

  3. #53
    Thailand Expat Pol the Pot's Avatar
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    Even without the bullet itself it should be fairly easy to find out what weapon was fired at the Japanese.

    Is the body still around or was it immediately burned?

  4. #54
    Mid
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    Reporters Without Borders condemns the government for dragging its feet over this affair. The authorities are guilty of allowing a sense of impunity to creep in. The organization also condemns the biased results of the commission of enquiry, which refuses to indicate decisively who fired the fatal shots.

    The organization calls on the Thai authorities make public as quickly as possible the results of an independent and satisfactory enquiry into the deaths of Muramoto, who was Japanese, and Fabio Polenghi, an Italian photo-journalist who was killed during an assault by the military on the Red Shirts on 19 May.

    The grave political crisis that shook Thailand in April and May 2010 presented a worrying picture of the security of journalists and of press freedom there. It is clear that during the violent clashes between soldiers and the Red Shirts the two sides were using live rounds. It is the duty of the authorities to shed light on exactly what happened.

    Shortly after these events, Reporters Without Borders published in July 2010 a report calling for an independent enquiry into crimes against the media.

    Contradictions riddle enquiry into death of Reuters cameraman - Reporters Without Borders

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveCM
    The minister of political affairs at the Japanese Embassy Tuesday met with Pol General Ek Angsananon, who headed the panel probing deaths during the red-shirt protests last year, to request a progress report on the investigation into the death of a Japanese cameraman killed during clashes on April 10.
    http://teakdoor.com/thailand-and-asi...ml#post1711244 (Exclusive: Probe reveals Thai troops' role in civilian deaths)

  6. #56
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    Japanese envoy inquires DSI of progress in Japanese cameraman's death

    A Japanese envoy visited the director-general of the Department of Special Investigation Thursday to find out the progress of investigations into the death of a Japanese cameraman.

    Nobuaki Ito, the minister of Political Affairs at the Japanese embassy in Bangkok, spent over an hour discussing with the DSI chief Tharit Phengdit.

    Reuters cameraman Hiro Muramoto was killed while recording the clash between troops and red-shirt protesters at the Kokwua Intersection on April 11 last year.

    Speaking to reporters after the meeting, Tharit said he informed the envoy of police's finding that there was no evidence that Muramoto was killed by troops.

    Tharit said he informed the envoy that the DSI will soon consult the public prosecutors as to how to proceed with the case folloiwng the police's finding.

    nationmultimedia.com



    Mr Tharit told the Japanese delegates that the Royal Thai Police had sent an additional autopsy report on Muramoto back to the DSI. It included new oral, individual and expert opinion.

    The report concluded that there was no evidence to indicate his death was caused by the security forces.

    Mr Ito appeared neither satisfied nor upset by the DSI’s clarification, said Mr Tharit. He came only to hear about the progress on the case.

    http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/loca...royuki-s-death
    Last edited by Mid; 31-03-2011 at 07:24 PM.

  7. #57
    Mid
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    Today is the first anniversary of Muramoto’s death.

    Shortly before 9pm on April 10, 2010, a day in which 26 people were shot dead in Bangkok, the 43-year-old cameraman was hit by a high-velocity bullet.

    He died of massive bleeding before he reached the hospital.

    Thank you for the whitewash, Thailand | Asian Correspondent

  8. #58
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    Attempt to transfer burden of investigating cameraman’s death on to Reuters
    Thursday 14 April 2011

    Reporters Without Borders deplores Department of Special Investigation director-general Tharit Pengdit’s suggestion that the investigation into Japanese cameraman Hiroyuki Muramoto’s death could be "delegated" to his employer, the Reuters news agency.

    “By doing this, any witness to the crime might be daring enough to provide tip-offs to Reuters more than they would to the state officials,” Tharit said after meeting with two of the British news agency’s representatives on 11 April to discuss the investigation.

    Muramoto was shot dead during clashes between government forces and anti-government “Red Shirts” in Bangkok on 10 April 2010.

    “The DSI’s proposal shows that the Thai government is refusing to identify those who were responsible for Muramoto’s death,” Reporters Without Borders said. “A government that respects the rule of law has an obligation to establish the truth and to ensure that justice is done.”

    Reporters Without Borders recognizes the importance of cooperation between Reuters and the authorities in charge of the investigation but cannot accept any attempt by the DSI to offload its responsibility.

    Reuters has not issued any statement about its meeting with Tharit almost exactly one year after Muramoto’s death. Although a year has gone by, the authorities still have not said who killed the cameraman.

    Erratic investigation yields “utterly unsatisfactory” findings
    25-03-2011

    Reporters Without Borders regards the findings from the official investigation into Japanese cameraman Hiro Muramoto’s death during clashes between government forces and anti-government “Red Shirts” in Bangkok on 10 April 2010 as “utterly unsatisfactory.”

    The provisional conclusion one year after the event that the security forces did not fire the shot that killed Muramoto, who worked for Reuters, betrays a reluctance to shed light on the circumstances of his death and identify those responsible, Reporters Without Borders said.

    There have been several U-turns in the investigation. After initially suggesting that a soldier may have fired the shot, the Department of Special Investigation (DSI) said at the end of February that it had ruled out that possibility.

    DSI director-general Tharit Pengdith’s announcement yesterday that “we have to conclude for now that the government forces did not kill Mr. Muramoto until there is new evidence to say otherwise” is far from conclusive, just as his promise to accept any new evidence and continue searching for Muramoto’s killer is far from reassuring.

    In Reporters Without Borders’ view, the authorities have gradually and subtly suppressed the investigation although the foreign ministry had originally insisted that the commission created to investigate the violence would be independent.

    “Regardless of the investigation’s findings, the government will assume its responsibility,” foreign ministry spokesman Thani Thongphakdi told Reporters Without Borders in June 2010 (see the “Thailand: Licence to kill” report: http://en.rsf.org/thailand-report-o...).

    The violence between the army and government opponents began in March 2010, when thousands of “Red Shirt” supporters of Thaksin Shinawatra – the prime minister ousted in a coup in September 2006 – invaded Bangkok and demanded Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva’s resignation and new elections.

    Reporters Without Borders concluded in its report that the behaviour of both the army and the Red Shirt militias constituted a flagrant violation of the UNESCO Medellin Declaration on the obligation to protect journalists in war zones.

    Another journalist, Italian freelance photographer Fabio Polenghi, was killed during clashes on 19 May 2010. The circumstance of his death have never been clarified either. In all, around 90 people were killed in the course of the clashes of April and May 2010.

    en.rsf.org

  9. #59
    Mid
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  10. #60
    Mid
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    Thailand: Troops May Have Shot Protesters in Bangkok Unrest
    September 16, 2011

    The authorities pressed on Friday for a new investigation into the death of a Reuters cameraman, Hiro Muramoto, and 12 other civilians, who were shot and killed during political unrest in Bangkok last year; they said that Thai troops may have been involved in the shootings.

    The acknowledgment, in a statement by the Department of Special Investigation, marked a reversal from the determination by the agency’s chief in February that it was not possible that the soldiers had shot the 13 civilians.

    nytimes.com

  11. #61
    Mid
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    Death of a Journalist
    YAMAMOTO MUNESUKE
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011


    Kenji Nagai of APF lies injured after Burmese soldiers fired upon and then charged at protesters in Rangoon on September 27, 2007. Nagai, 50, a Japanese video journalist, was shot by soldiers as they fired to disperse the crowd. Nagai later died.
    (Photo: Reuters)

    It was painful to witness the images broadcast worldwide on September 27, 2007. Japanese cameraman Kenji Nagai was lying on his back on a street in Rangoon. Then there was the piercing sound of a bullet fired from the rifle of a soldier.

    Kenji Nagai, a man I considered a colleague, was dead. Immediately, I thought: It could have been me. As a photojournalist, I also report on conflicts. I have covered many Asian countries, including Burma, and I imagined myself in Kenji Nagai’s place, lying dead on a street in Rangoon.

    But, I was in Japan, and he was in Rangoon. However, I knew the streets where the pro-democracy demonstrations occurred—the scene was very familiar to me.

    For me, the shooting confirmed the true mentality of the Burmese junta, which has been killing and imprisoning the Burmese people with impunity for decades: 3,000 or more people dead in 1988 alone, the year I started covering events in Burma.

    On the day Kenji Nagai was murdered, I was taking photographs of Burmese exiled activists who were demonstrating in front of the Burmese Embassy in Tokyo, demanding the Japanese government stop supporting the State Peace and Development Council financially.

    Later that day, my mobile phone started ringing, one call after another without a break. News agencies and newspapers were calling me to check if the unidentified Japanese journalist killed in Rangoon was me or not. One call was from Australia, from my Burmese friend who had worked as my interpreter when I made trips to Burma. He explained that he was worried about me when he heard the news.

    Before long, the Japanese media confirmed the dead journalist was Kenji Nagai. His name was new to me, and we had never met.

    The TV news showed video of the shooting of Kenji Nagai over and over again for several days. The Japanese public was horrified and angry. The Japanese government seemed shocked. Perhaps for the first time, the government realized the SPDC is truly an evil government.

    When the funeral service was held on October 8, 2007 in Tokyo, hundreds of Burmese exiles attended the service to honor Kenji Nagai. They apologized for his death on behalf of the SPDC government, which they hate. It was a natural feeling for the Burmese people who live in Japan to express their sorrow for Kenji Nagai, who was now a martyr in the Burmese struggle for democracy.

    Media coverage on Kenji Nagai focused on his personality, his professional work in Iraq and elsewhere, but neglected any factual background on what had been happening in Burma under the military regime for the past 20 years. There were almost no critical questions about Japan’s foreign policy toward the military junta—whether it was trying to help the country move toward democracy or helping the SPDC.

    As a photojournalist, I have been critical of Japan’s foreign policy which has favored the SPDC generals rather than the democratic forces and the ethnic minorities. You can get a sense of Japan’s policy toward the SPDC through various comments made by top Japanese diplomats.

    For instance, the then Foreign Minister Yoriko Kawaguchi made an ignorant comment in May 2003, when she was asked about the murderous attack on Aung San Suu Kyi’s motorcade at Depayin. She said, “There is no deterioration of environment for dialogue between the SPDC and Aung San Suu Kyi.” She retracted her comment the next day.

    In May 2006, Japanese ambassador to the UN, Kenzo Oshima, said, “Burma does not constitute a regional threat yet,” and along with China and Russia, Japan opposed efforts by the US and EU to put Burma on the Security Council agenda.

    The latest and most shameless comment was made by Yoichi Yamaguchi, the former Japanese ambassador to Burma (1995-97). After the killing of Nagai, he was quoted in the Japanese media as saying several offensive comments:

    “Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy gave money to the demonstrators.”

    “There is not a single so-called political prisoner there [in Burma] in the true sense.”

    “The regime has succeeded in maintaining economic growth of over 5 percent annually, earning it the widespread trust of the people.”

    After Kenji Nagai’s death, the Japanese government took a seemingly strong stance. In New York, Foreign Minister Komura demanded an apology from the SPDC. But as time passed and the crackdown by security forces continued, the Japanese government remained quiet, simply waiting for the UN Security Council to act.

    “The government will coordinate efforts with the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to make progress in the democratization of Myanmar [Burma],” Komura said after the UNSC’s presidential statement was announced.

    Later, Japan cancelled a grant of up to 552 million yen (US $4.7 million).
    The grant had been intended to finance the construction of a human resources center.On October 28, the People’s Forum on Burma, an NGO formed in Tokyo in 1996 to support the Burmese people’s struggle for democracy, made a plea for the Japanese government to fundamentally change its foreign policy toward the SPDC by giving full-scale humanitarian support to the 160,000 displaced people in refugee camps in Thailand.

    The group also asked for a halt in grants to the Union Solidarity and Development Association, which was accused of taking part in the suppression of the demonstrators. In 2006, the USDA received a Japanese grant of nearly 24 million yen ($209,000) for construction of three grade school buildings. It also demanded that Japan stop humanitarian aid to subsidize Burma’s healthcare and education budgets while the military regime allocates more than 50 percent of its national budget on the military.

    The group wants to pressure the Japanese government to support the Burmese people and the pro-democracy groups, instead of helping to keep the generals in power.

    A Burmese citizen in Tokyo, a former political prisoner, said Burmese exiles remember two Japanese citizens: one with hate, and one with great respect.

    One is former ambassador Yoichi Yamaguchi; the other is journalist Kenji Nagai.

    Yamamoto Munesuke’s books include “Burma’s Children” and “Burma’s Great Illusions.” He was deported from Burma in 1998 “for gathering news,” following his exclusive interview with Aung San Suu Kyi.

    irrawaddy.org

  12. #62
    Mid
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    "Clear" evidence Thai troops killed Japanese cameraman
    29 November 2011



    BANGKOK: Thai authorities have clear evidence that government troops were responsible for the death of a Japanese cameraman during a crackdown on opposition protests last year, a top official said Tuesday.

    The announcement came a day after Thai police said they had summoned former prime minister Abhisit Vejjajiva in connection with deaths during the military operation to end the April-May 2010 "Red Shirt" demonstrations in Bangkok.

    "After investigation it's very clear in the case of the Japanese cameraman (Hiroyuki Muramoto) that it was the act of government security forces. There are eyewitnesses as well as forensic evidence," Deputy Prime Minister Chalerm Yubamrung told the Japanese ambassador at Government House.

    More than 90 people, mostly civilians, were killed and nearly 1,900 were wounded during the two months of rallies, which drew about 100,000 "Red Shirt" demonstrators at their peak, calling for immediate elections.

    Police initially insisted that soldiers were not behind the killing of Muramoto, a Reuters cameraman who was shot during clashes between troops and protesters, as was Italian freelance photographer Fabio Polenghi.

    The kingdom remains deeply divided by the bloodshed. Thailand now has a new government allied to the Red Shirts' hero, fugitive former leader Thaksin Shinawatra, whose sister Yingluck is prime minister.

    channelnewsasia.com

  13. #63
    Mid
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    Police send Japanese cameraman's case to prosecutors
    December 13, 2011

    Police have already concluded the investigation report on the death of Japanese cameraman Hiro Muramoto, who was gunned down during the clash of red-shirt demonstrators and soldiers in Bangkok last year.

    The report was forwarded to public prosecutors Wednesday afternoon.

    Deputy Metropolitan Police Commissioner Maj General Anuchai Lekbamrung disclosed that the case was backed with evidence in the forms of still photos and video recordings.

    nationmultimedia.com

  14. #64
    Mid
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    Thailand to offer compensation for slain Japanese
    6 March 2012

    Thailand will offer $250,000 in compensation to the family of a Japanese cameraman shot dead during a crackdown on protests in Bangkok two years ago, Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said Tuesday.

    Yingluck told reporters before leaving on an official visit to Japan that her government would send a letter of condolence to the family of Hiroyuki Muramoto, a Reuters cameraman.

    "The letter is issued on behalf of the Thai prime minister to Hiroyuki's family and to inform them of the compensation they are entitled to receive like others," Yingluck told reporters.

    "I will not have enough time to meet with his family due to my busy itinerary," she said when asked if she would personally see the late journalist's relatives.

    Last month Yingluck's government approved a 2.0 billion baht ($65 million) budget to compensate for all deaths and injuries sustained during a string of violent rival political protests since 2005.

    Yingluck's government, which took power last year, has said there is clear evidence that soldiers were responsible for the death of Muramoto during the April-May 2010 "Red Shirt" demonstrations.

    The Red Shirts are broadly loyal to Thailand's fugitive former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who is Yingluck's older brother.

    More than 90 people, mostly civilians, were killed and nearly 1,900 were wounded during the 2010 Red Shirt rallies, which ended in a bloody military crackdown under the previous premier, Abhisit Vejjajiva.

    Yingluck is scheduled to visit Japan from late Tuesday until Sunday in an attempt to win back the confidence of Japanese manufacturers hit by the kingdom's worst floods in decades last year.

    "I'm convinced that the government will be able to regain Japanese investor confidence because I will explain to every group, and I do hope that they will not relocate or withdraw investment from Thailand," she said.

    rnw.nl

  15. #65
    Mid
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mid
    Thailand will offer $250,000 in compensation
    words fail me

  16. #66
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    yes, me too. what an insult.

  17. #67
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    Why??

    Contrast this offer with the risible amount awarded to victims of the Santika conflagration in which they were demonstrably placed in danger by proven criminal negligence. It's a veritable king's ransom in comparison.

    After all, the cameraman went there voluntarily in the full knowledge an armed confrontation was in progress and so to a certain degree he had already accepted the risk.

    Of course, the current government is keen to buy off the Japanese, particularly after all that flood damage to their property which arose out of Thai negligence. That Yingluck has blamed the army under the command of Abhisit is really of little use to anyone keen on finding out the truth but perhaps they think it will do the trick.

    The Thai really are quite unsophisticated and certainly do seem to think that their domestic modus operandi in avoiding responsibility can be applied equally to the international arena.

  18. #68
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    Are the families of the six people murdered at Wat Patum going to get $250K each, too? Nobody in their right mind doubts who killed them.

  19. #69
    Mid
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    Inquest into death of Japanese cameraman launched
    May 21, 2012


    Hiroyuki Muramoto

    A Thai court on Monday opened an inquest into the death of a Japanese cameraman during a street battle between soldiers and anti-government protesters in Bangkok two years ago.

    The Bangkok Southern Criminal Court heard prosecution claims that Hiroyuki Muramoto, a cameraman for Thomson Reuters, was shot dead by soldiers on April 10, 2010, while filming the conflict in the old part of the capital.

    The court also opened similar cases in the deaths of four Thai protesters killed on the same day.

    The prosecution intends to prove that their deaths were caused bythe military, which had been called in to disperse a demonstration led by the United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship that had seized the neighbourhood for weeks.

    "These cases are expected to take a long time because they will involve many witnesses and a lot of evidence," the chief prosecutor told the court.

    About 25 people died in the April 10 melee, including six soldiers. From April 10 to May 19, the day the 2010 demonstration was crushed, an estimated 92 people were killed including a dozen soldiers and police.

    No official has been held responsible in the killings.

    Human Rights Watch’s Thailand representative Sunai Pasuk welcomed the opening of the inquests Monday but expressed scepticism about their outcomes.

    "The trials are not for prosecution but to establish the cause of death," Sunai said. "The outcomes could be used by the relatives of the victims to file new cases against those culpable, but this is going to take a long time." Hiroyuki was one of two foreign journalists killed in the 2010protests.

    Italian freelance photographer Fabio Polenghi was shot during the May 19 crackdown on the protesters known as "red shirts" that had occupied parts of central Bangkok for more than a month. Polenghi’s inquest is to open July 23.

    On Saturday, tens of thousands of red shirts returned to central Bangkok to commemorate the crackdown and call on the government to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths.

    nationmultimedia.com

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