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  1. #1
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    Accomadation website

    Does any one know of bangkok, phuket websites/forums/portals that reccommend appartment/development for rent for 6 months or more

    i know of craigslist
    phuketgazzette
    baht sold

    Need to find an apartment around the 25-35k mark andd hopefully advise on them without viewing first

    cheers

  2. #2
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    dirtydog's Avatar
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    You would advise somebody on an apartment that you haven't even viewed? You would put your credibility on the line for what a developer says about his apartment without verifying for yourself? Braver man than me.

  3. #3
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    Have you bothered your lazy arse to search the subforums on here?

    PS It also helps your credibility if you can spell accommodation.

  4. #4
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    MrRoomfinder.com

  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    Hi All,
    Hopefully this is not another forum, where all people seem too do is pick fault with comments written in the best of faith.
    My Comments: to the replies
    Dirty dog - My apologies for not mentioning that the advice is for myself, which I can get from websites first and then make a list to view. In my view would save time and cost.
    Chassamuai - I take acceptation to the fact you call me a lazy arse without knowing me. Never judge a book by its cover my friend and im asking for advice as I know this is supposed to be a respected forum and therefore answers would be given from individuals with the knowledge of this question. Also my credibility is very good, don’t worry on that score. Sorry for not spelling correctly, im sure you’re perfect!
    Humbert - Thank you for the recommendation, appreciated.
    Ritchie - Good call, ive met Welta personally sometime ago and forgot her website, will add to my list.

    Kind Regards

  7. #7
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    So you did not bother your arse to take my advice and read the outstanding, and comprehensive property threads on this site?

    More fool you.

    You mean exception, not acceptation, which is not actaully a real word.

  8. #8
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    Chassamui

    Grow up , you sound like a very sad bitter person.

  9. #9
    DaffyDuck
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    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui View Post
    You mean exception, not acceptation, which is not actaully a real word.
    How many foreign languages do you speak?

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui
    actaully
    What's this mean then Chas ???

  11. #11
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    jandajoy

    Well spotted, but it will fall on deaf ears, as he sounds and talks as though hes perfect.
    Met many perfect people like him over my years on this planet.
    I used to bite back, but now i just smile and let them waste their time being perfect.

  12. #12
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    So you still have not bothered to check out the excellent property sub forums on teak door?
    I have no objection to you being dumb but i will pick you up for being ignorant.

    By the way, a typo is different to a spelling mistake.

  13. #13
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    thaiapartment.com

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui
    So you still have not bothered to check out the excellent property sub forums on teak door?
    Fair comment really.

  15. #15
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
    slackula's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandajoy
    Fair comment really.
    It is a fair comment but it does smack of the "RTFM!" type attitude that got Linux users such a bad rep back in the day imho.

    Wellta's site recommended above isn't a bad place to start, but for Phuket it is also a good idea to stay in a hotel for a few days and drive around a bit.
    bibo ergo sum
    If you hear the thunder be happy - the lightening missed.
    This time.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slackula
    "RTFM!"
    OK, I agree with you absolutely.

    One question.


    WTF does RTFM mean?


    Really Tight Female Minge ?

  17. #17
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
    slackula's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandajoy
    WTF does RTFM mean?
    Short answer:
    Read The Fucking (or Fine ) Manual.

    Long answer:
    When using Unix (or Linux) if you want more info on what a command does you can type "man command" in a terminal (similar to typing help command in a DOS prompt) and the built-in help system will display manual information about that command.

    At times the manual pages can be rather impenetrable* or unhelpful for a newbie but in the early days of networking when bandwidth was scarce people would get tired of newbies asking questions that had been answered before or asked many times and instead of offering help would simply respond with "RTFM!".

    The response is generally frowned upon on sites that aim to provide help or advice except in circumstances where the questioner has clearly made no attempt to read anything or is trying to cheat on his homework etc.

    *Here is a fine example of a Unix man page for the command sed, a very useful command but sadly a rather brain-boggling manual page:
    Code:
    SED(1)                    BSD General Commands Manual                   SED(1)
    
    NAME
         sed -- stream editor
    
    SYNOPSIS
         sed [-Ealn] command [file ...]
         sed [-Ealn] [-e command] [-f command_file] [-i extension] [file ...]
    
    DESCRIPTION
         The sed utility reads the specified files, or the standard input if no
         files are specified, modifying the input as specified by a list of com-
         mands.  The input is then written to the standard output.
    
         A single command may be specified as the first argument to sed.  Multiple
         commands may be specified by using the -e or -f options.  All commands
         are applied to the input in the order they are specified regardless of
         their origin.
    
         The following options are available:
    
         -E      Interpret regular expressions as extended (modern) regular
                 expressions rather than basic regular expressions (BRE's).  The
                 re_format(7) manual page fully describes both formats.
    
         -a      The files listed as parameters for the ``w'' functions are cre-
                 ated (or truncated) before any processing begins, by default.
                 The -a option causes sed to delay opening each file until a com-
                 mand containing the related ``w'' function is applied to a line
                 of input.
    
         -e command
                 Append the editing commands specified by the command argument to
                 the list of commands.
    
         -f command_file
                 Append the editing commands found in the file command_file to the
                 list of commands.  The editing commands should each be listed on
                 a separate line.
    
         -i extension
                 Edit files in-place, saving backups with the specified extension.
                 If a zero-length extension is given, no backup will be saved.  It
                 is not recommended to give a zero-length extension when in-place
                 editing files, as you risk corruption or partial content in situ-
                 ations where disk space is exhausted, etc.
    
         -l      Make output line buffered.
    
         -n      By default, each line of input is echoed to the standard output
                 after all of the commands have been applied to it.  The -n option
                 suppresses this behavior.
    
         The form of a sed command is as follows:
    
               [address[,address]]function[arguments]
    
         Whitespace may be inserted before the first address and the function por-
         tions of the command.
    
         Normally, sed cyclically copies a line of input, not including its termi-
         nating newline character, into a pattern space, (unless there is some-
         thing left after a ``D'' function), applies all of the commands with
         addresses that select that pattern space, copies the pattern space to the
         standard output, appending a newline, and deletes the pattern space.
    
         Some of the functions use a hold space to save all or part of the pattern
         space for subsequent retrieval.
    
    Sed Addresses
         An address is not required, but if specified must be a number (that
         counts input lines cumulatively across input files), a dollar (``$'')
         character that addresses the last line of input, or a context address
         (which consists of a regular expression preceded and followed by a delim-
         iter).
    
         A command line with no addresses selects every pattern space.
    
         A command line with one address selects all of the pattern spaces that
         match the address.
    
         A command line with two addresses selects an inclusive range.  This range
         starts with the first pattern space that matches the first address.  The
         end of the range is the next following pattern space that matches the
         second address.  If the second address is a number less than or equal to
         the line number first selected, only that line is selected.  In the case
         when the second address is a context address, sed does not re-match the
         second address against the pattern space that matched the first address.
         Starting at the first line following the selected range, sed starts look-
         ing again for the first address.
    
         Editing commands can be applied to non-selected pattern spaces by use of
         the exclamation character (``!'') function.
    
    Sed Regular Expressions
         The regular expressions used in sed, by default, are basic regular
         expressions (BREs, see re_format(7) for more information), but extended
         (modern) regular expressions can be used instead if the -E flag is given.
         In addition, sed has the following two additions to regular expressions:
    
         1.   In a context address, any character other than a backslash (``\'')
              or newline character may be used to delimit the regular expression.
              Also, putting a backslash character before the delimiting character
              causes the character to be treated literally.  For example, in the
              context address \xabc\xdefx, the RE delimiter is an ``x'' and the
              second ``x'' stands for itself, so that the regular expression is
              ``abcxdef''.
    
         2.   The escape sequence \n matches a newline character embedded in the
              pattern space.  You cannot, however, use a literal newline character
              in an address or in the substitute command.
    
         One special feature of sed regular expressions is that they can default
         to the last regular expression used.  If a regular expression is empty,
         i.e., just the delimiter characters are specified, the last regular
         expression encountered is used instead.  The last regular expression is
         defined as the last regular expression used as part of an address or sub-
         stitute command, and at run-time, not compile-time.  For example, the
         command ``/abc/s//XXX/'' will substitute ``XXX'' for the pattern ``abc''.
    
    Sed Functions
         In the following list of commands, the maximum number of permissible
         addresses for each command is indicated by [0addr], [1addr], or [2addr],
         representing zero, one, or two addresses.
    
         The argument text consists of one or more lines.  To embed a newline in
         the text, precede it with a backslash.  Other backslashes in text are
         deleted and the following character taken literally.
    
         The ``r'' and ``w'' functions take an optional file parameter, which
         should be separated from the function letter by white space.  Each file
         given as an argument to sed is created (or its contents truncated) before
         any input processing begins.
    
         The ``b'', ``r'', ``s'', ``t'', ``w'', ``y'', ``!'', and ``:'' functions
         all accept additional arguments.  The following synopses indicate which
         arguments have to be separated from the function letters by white space
         characters.
    
         Two of the functions take a function-list.  This is a list of sed func-
         tions separated by newlines, as follows:
    
               { function
                 function
                 ...
                 function
               }
    
         The ``{'' can be preceded by white space and can be followed by white
         space.  The function can be preceded by white space.  The terminating
         ``}'' must be preceded by a newline or optional white space.
    
         [2addr] function-list
                 Execute function-list only when the pattern space is selected.
    
         [1addr]a\
         text    Write text to standard output immediately before each attempt to
                 read a line of input, whether by executing the ``N'' function or
                 by beginning a new cycle.
    
         [2addr]b[label]
                 Branch to the ``:'' function with the specified label.  If the
                 label is not specified, branch to the end of the script.
    
         [2addr]c\
         text    Delete the pattern space.  With 0 or 1 address or at the end of a
                 2-address range, text is written to the standard output.
    
         [2addr]d
                 Delete the pattern space and start the next cycle.
    
         [2addr]D
                 Delete the initial segment of the pattern space through the first
                 newline character and start the next cycle.
    
         [2addr]g
                 Replace the contents of the pattern space with the contents of
                 the hold space.
    
         [2addr]G
                 Append a newline character followed by the contents of the hold
                 space to the pattern space.
    
         [2addr]h
                 Replace the contents of the hold space with the contents of the
                 pattern space.
    
         [2addr]H
                 Append a newline character followed by the contents of the pat-
                 tern space to the hold space.
    
         [1addr]i\
         text    Write text to the standard output.
    
         [2addr]l
                 (The letter ell.)  Write the pattern space to the standard output
                 in a visually unambiguous form.  This form is as follows:
    
                       backslash          \\
                       alert              \a
                       form-feed          \f
                       carriage-return    \r
                       tab                \t
                       vertical tab       \v
    
                 Nonprintable characters are written as three-digit octal numbers
                 (with a preceding backslash) for each byte in the character (most
                 significant byte first).  Long lines are folded, with the point
                 of folding indicated by displaying a backslash followed by a new-
                 line.  The end of each line is marked with a ``$''.
    
         [2addr]n
                 Write the pattern space to the standard output if the default
                 output has not been suppressed, and replace the pattern space
                 with the next line of input.
    
         [2addr]N
                 Append the next line of input to the pattern space, using an
                 embedded newline character to separate the appended material from
                 the original contents.  Note that the current line number
                 changes.
    
         [2addr]p
                 Write the pattern space to standard output.
    
         [2addr]P
                 Write the pattern space, up to the first newline character to the
                 standard output.
    
         [1addr]q
                 Branch to the end of the script and quit without starting a new
                 cycle.
    
         [1addr]r file
                 Copy the contents of file to the standard output immediately
                 before the next attempt to read a line of input.  If file cannot
                 be read for any reason, it is silently ignored and no error con-
                 dition is set.
    
         [2addr]s/regular expression/replacement/flags
                 Substitute the replacement string for the first instance of the
                 regular expression in the pattern space.  Any character other
                 than backslash or newline can be used instead of a slash to
                 delimit the RE and the replacement.  Within the RE and the
                 replacement, the RE delimiter itself can be used as a literal
                 character if it is preceded by a backslash.
    
                 An ampersand (``&'') appearing in the replacement is replaced by
                 the string matching the RE.  The special meaning of ``&'' in this
                 context can be suppressed by preceding it by a backslash.  The
                 string ``\#'', where ``#'' is a digit, is replaced by the text
                 matched by the corresponding backreference expression (see
                 re_format(7)).
    
                 A line can be split by substituting a newline character into it.
                 To specify a newline character in the replacement string, precede
                 it with a backslash.
    
                 The value of flags in the substitute function is zero or more of
                 the following:
    
                       N       Make the substitution only for the N'th occurrence
                               of the regular expression in the pattern space.
    
                       g       Make the substitution for all non-overlapping
                               matches of the regular expression, not just the
                               first one.
    
                       p       Write the pattern space to standard output if a
                               replacement was made.  If the replacement string is
                               identical to that which it replaces, it is still
                               considered to have been a replacement.
    
                       w file  Append the pattern space to file if a replacement
                               was made.  If the replacement string is identical
                               to that which it replaces, it is still considered
                               to have been a replacement.
    
         [2addr]t [label]
                 Branch to the ``:'' function bearing the label if any substitu-
                 tions have been made since the most recent reading of an input
                 line or execution of a ``t'' function.  If no label is specified,
                 branch to the end of the script.
    
         [2addr]w file
                 Append the pattern space to the file.
    
         [2addr]x
                 Swap the contents of the pattern and hold spaces.
    
         [2addr]y/string1/string2/
                 Replace all occurrences of characters in string1 in the pattern
                 space with the corresponding characters from string2.  Any char-
                 acter other than a backslash or newline can be used instead of a
                 slash to delimit the strings.  Within string1 and string2, a
                 backslash followed by an ``n'' is replaced by a newline charac-
                 ter.  A pair of backslashes is replaced by a literal backslash.
                 Finally, a backslash followed by any other character (except a
                 newline) is that literal character.
    
         [2addr]!function
         [2addr]!function-list
                 Apply the function or function-list only to the lines that are
                 not selected by the address(es).
    
         [0addr]:label
                 This function does nothing; it bears a label to which the ``b''
                 and ``t'' commands may branch.
    
         [1addr]=
                 Write the line number to the standard output followed by a new-
                 line character.
    
         [0addr]
                 Empty lines are ignored.
    
         [0addr]#
                 The ``#'' and the remainder of the line are ignored (treated as a
                 comment), with the single exception that if the first two charac-
                 ters in the file are ``#n'', the default output is suppressed.
                 This is the same as specifying the -n option on the command line.
    
    ENVIRONMENT
         The COLUMNS, LANG, LC_ALL, LC_CTYPE and LC_COLLATE environment variables
         affect the execution of sed as described in environ(7).
    
    EXIT STATUS
         The sed utility exits 0 on success, and >0 if an error occurs.
    
    LEGACY DESCRIPTION
         Warnings are not generated for unused labels.  In legacy mode, they are.
    
         In the -y function, doubled backslashes are not converted to single ones.
         In legacy mode, they are.
    
         For more information about legacy mode, see compat(5).
    
    SEE ALSO
         awk(1), ed(1), grep(1), regex(3), compat(5), re_format(7)
    
    STANDARDS
         The sed utility is expected to be a superset of the IEEE Std 1003.2
         (``POSIX.2'') specification.
    
         The -E, -a and -i options are non-standard FreeBSD extensions and may not
         be available on other operating systems.
    
    HISTORY
         A sed command, written by L. E. McMahon, appeared in Version 7 AT&T UNIX.
    
    AUTHORS
         Diomidis D. Spinellis <dds[at]FreeBSD.org>
    
    BUGS
         Multibyte characters containing a byte with value 0x5C (ASCII `\') may be
         incorrectly treated as line continuation characters in arguments to the
         ``a'', ``c'' and ``i'' commands.  Multibyte characters cannot be used as
         delimiters with the ``s'' and ``y'' commands.
    
    BSD                              May 10, 2005                              BSD
    All well and good for somebody with the time and knowledge to read through it all but not really helpful for somebody skimming through to work out what sed does in a nutshell or if sed is the command they need to accomplish a certain task.



    /and no, I still haven't mastered sed. Or awk, which is another gem.

  18. #18
    DaffyDuck
    Guest
    Which is why Linux users are commonly referred to as 'freetards'

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slackula
    "man command"
    What do girls do ?

  20. #20
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    smash the gash off themselves coz their husbands are too busy nitpicking on places like TD?

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat jandajoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chairman Mao
    smash the gash off themselves
    Lovely turn of phrase....

  22. #22
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
    slackula's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaffyDuck
    Which is why Linux users are commonly referred to as 'freetards'

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