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  1. #176
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    A South Australia cyclist is fighting for his life in hospital after a freak accident involving a kangaroo.The 52-year-old Seaton resident was on a popular Adelaide Hills ride on Sunday morning when the roo leapt out in front of him from nearby bushes.
    The impact threw the man from his bike, splitting the two-wheeled vehicle in half in the process.
    He had been riding downhill along Norton Summit Road when the animal suddenly appeared.

    Fellow cyclists said there was little that could be done when wildlife enters the path of oncoming traffic.
    “You’ve got to take care in anything you do but some things you just have no control over,” one cyclist said.
    While one cyclist told News Corp the 52-year-old may have been travelling at speeds of 60km/h, another told 7News they remain vigilant on the road.


    “We don’t fly down the hill we ride down the hill, very safe, we try to be as safe as we can,” he said.
    The man was rushed to Royal Adelaide Hospital where he remains in a critical condition with multiple fractures.
    Another rider who came across the accident said on social media the victim “looked in a bad way … but that’s the risk we cyclists take”.
    “The kangaroos are there we know – we just hope that it never happens to one of us,” another cyclist said.
    It’s not the first incident of it’s kind in South Australia.
    Last year, a group of cyclists filmed a close encounter with a roo at Humbug Scrub.
    And in 2015, a man died after being knocked off his bike at Victor Harbor.

    https://au.news.yahoo.com/cyclist-fi...211350328.html

  2. #177
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    Australia has more things that can kill you than any other place on the planet.

  3. #178
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  4. #179
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    That list is missing bull sharks and bogans full of rum and meth.
    Btw red backs are rarely fatal and grey nurse sharks are placid.
    Unlike tiger sharks or makos. Or taipans.

  5. #180
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    Blue ringed octopus.
    Short-tempered brown snakes, red-belly black snakes...
    I read somewhere that 7 of the world's deadliest snakes are Australian. So the other 3 would be black mamba, king cobra, and...?

  6. #181
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    krait ?

  7. #182
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    It also depends a lot on how they are ranked.

    Many people think that Australia’s inland taipan is the most dangerous snake in the world.
    It has the most potent venom of any snake but the fact is it is not massively more toxic than the eastern brown’s venom and the taipan is not particularly aggressive.

    The Eastern Brown is also much bigger and far more common than the taipan, which along with its bad temper makes these snakes a greater danger.

    The Russel's viper kills more humans than any other snake, not because its more toxic, but because of its habitat and also probably because its victims have less access to proper medical care (being poor Indians).
    Last edited by TizMe; 22-10-2018 at 11:19 AM.

  8. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    krait ?
    Found in Australia.

  9. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    It also depends a lot on how they are ranked.
    That makes sense. Most deadly venom, or most prevalent killer? Could be either, depending on the angle the study is coming from.

  10. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Club Soda View Post
    Where does your buddy Loytoy rank ?
    On the scale of ranking snakes for deadliness, I think LT would be a legless lizard.
    With sometimes emphasis on the legless part . No offense LT, lets be realistic, big heart, you are quite harmless and wouldn't hurt a fly.

  11. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Found in Australia.
    Oops.

    As others have mentioned : depends on how they are ranked : aggression and and how much venom it actually injects.

    Other aspects too, for instance : the Death Adder has the fastest strike rate of any Australian snake, but it lies in wait till something touches its tail, so it is only striking towards its own tail....so not aggressive at all.

  12. #187
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    ^ What about legless lizards?

  13. #188
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    https://www.xxx.xxx.xx/news/2018-10-...-fish/10418028

    Standing chest-deep in the water to cast a line is rarely a good idea in the Top End.


    Key points:
    A man has been photographed standing chest-deep in crocodile-infested water
    More than 20 per cent of all saltwater crocodiles caught this year in the NT were in Hope Inlet
    A witness warned the man of the danger, and he "sort of shrugged his shoulders"
    But Simon Bochow was "gobsmacked" when he saw a man doing just that at Shoal Bay's Hope Inlet, with a two-and-a-half-metre saltwater crocodile in a trap less than 40 metres away.


    "It's not a big crocodile but it will still take a leg off," Mr Bochow said.


    "And I've seen bigger ones in there."


    This year, 59 crocodiles have been pulled out of Hope Inlet — 20 per cent of the 285 caught across the entire Northern Territory.


    "Not only that but it's the start of the stinger season," Mr Bochow told Tales from the Tinny.


    "And we're starting to see a lot of big box jellyfish floating round there as well."


    As he went past in his boat, he warned the man of the nearby crocodile, and he "sort of shrugged his shoulders".


    Boaties were surprised to see two blokes up to their chests in Hope Inlet, Shoal Bay at the weekend. Just across the creek from a croc trap with a 2m saltie in it.
    "We were gobsmacked. We [were] just, 'Alright, no worries'; we just kept going," he said.


    "There was not a whole lot we could do.


    "It was unbelievable."


    The region is also known for its powerful tides and big channels.


    While Mr Bochow said the tide that day was not the biggest, he still thought the man would have had to swim at least half the way to shore.


    But the risk did not even appear to be paying off.


    "We didn't see him catch a fish," Mr Bochow said.




    Crocodile expert Grahame Webb said he thought the move was "pretty damn risky", equating it to running a red light.




    "The probability of getting attacked [in that area] is very low, relative to some of these other areas," he said.


    "If you went swimming down the Adelaide River, there's a 100 per cent chance you're going to get taken.


    "[But] it's a matter of whether it's going to be five minutes or 10 minutes or 15 minutes. I don't think you'd get beyond 15 minutes, no."


    He said he often thought about why people took risks around crocodiles — saying he "gets a bit philosophical about it" — and believed in Australia it boiled down to misadventure rather than stupidity.


    "Everyone up here is really pretty well educated about crocs," he said.


    "I think people who get attacked often know something's dangerous but they decide to do it anyway, just on the spur of the moment.


    "There's a million-dollar fish out there! You might be tempted to take some sort of risk you don't normally take, I don't know."


    Senior wildlife ranger with the Crocodile Management Unit Tom Nichols said he was "quite shocked" when he saw the photograph.


    He said the risk of crocodile attacks was elevated at this time of year, because it is breeding season and the animals are more active.


    "We get a large number of crocodiles out of the Hope Inlet, especially Howard River itself," he said.


    "And the water's so dirty you can't see what's in there.


    "For someone to be swimming and carrying on like that, it's a pretty big risk to take."


    He said anyone who spotted a crocodile in a trap, or that could be a danger to the public, should report it by calling 0419 822 859 in Darwin or 0407 958 405 in Katherine.

  14. #189
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    ^ Risk of bull sharks too, I imagine.
    To be fair, I think once you're in position and just standing still, the risk of a croc taking you is much lower. I think they hunt by sight, movement of the prey, rather than smell, so a stationary object would be uninteresting to them.

    What's the bizzo about
    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    "There's a million-dollar fish out there!
    ? Is there a competition going on?

  15. #190
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    nasty one, porridge crested yogaying

  16. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    ^ Risk of bull sharks too, I imagine.
    To be fair, I think once you're in position and just standing still, the risk of a croc taking you is much lower. I think they hunt by sight, movement of the prey, rather than smell, so a stationary object would be uninteresting to them.

    What's the bizzo about
    ? Is there a competition going on?

    They'v put tokens in a few selected Barra that can win you up to a million if you can catch one. It's all about promoting tourism. The odds are about the same as winning the lottery.
    By the way, I wouldn't recommend the "standing still" option when approach be a croc, especially a salty. There's only one sure fire way of getting clear and that's to run faster than your mate. They're fucking fast when they go for it. Having spent a fair few years in the NT and FNQ in mostly remote areas, I've no sympathy for these twats that ignore the signs and the advice of locals.
    "The ability to play gracefully with ideas."

    Oskar Wilde.

  17. #192
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  18. #193
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    Ah magpies, the only creature that everything in Australia is scared of


  19. #194
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    ^ Horrible,nasty creatures.
    Have been swooped a few times scared the shit out of me.

  20. #195
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    Reference the Million Dollar Barra;

    Million-dollar-fish campaign: Darwin fisherman finds $10,000 in his freezer


    By Tales from the Tinny
    Updated about 3 hours ago
    PHOTO: Basil Te Aho didn't realise he'd won $10,000 until he went to cook dinner. (ABC News: Mitchell Abram)
    RELATED STORY: Fishermen 'gobsmacked' to see man standing chest-deep in crocodile-infested waterway
    RELATED STORY: 'Blood was everywhere': Flying mackerel cuts woman's throat
    RELATED STORY: Fisherman nearly lost finger after delaying sea snake bite treatment to keep fishing

    A fortnight went by with Basil Te Aho pottering around his Darwin kitchen, clueless to the fact there was $10,000 in his freezer.
    But last night, he decided to cook the barramundi he caught with his 83-year-old father, Kimgi Te Aho, at Yellow Waters two weeks ago.
    As he went to clean it, he noticed a small, red tag with the date — March 31 2019.
    As part of the Million Dollar Fish tourism campaign, 100 tagged fish have been released into Top End waterways that will win the catcher $10,000, if caught before the end of March next year.
    There are also five $1 million fish.
    After a quick call to the campaign operators, Mr Te Aho realised he was a winner.
    "There was fist raising everywhere," he said.
    "I told [my dad], he was pretty excited."
    $10k in the ice-tray


    ABC's Tales from the Tinny speaks to Basil Te Aho, who took two weeks to realise he had a $10,000 fish in his freezer


    He had no idea of the windfall when he caught it two weeks ago.
    "We went to Yellow Waters and were just trawling along the lagoon," he said.
    "And this thing hit my line, [I] pulled it in and there it was. Got it on the boat and put it in the esky straight away.
    "[Then I] come home, stuck it straight into the freezer. Then went straight to bed, because I was that tired."
    He said he would probably give some of the money to his dad, some more to his family and spend the rest travelling to his hometown of Wairoa in New Zealand.
    Although he never got the chance to eat his dinner last night, he said he would probably smoke the lucky fish today.
    Topics: fishing-aquaculture, tourism, lifestyle-and-leisure, travel-and-tourism, darwin-0800
    First posted about 3 hours ago

  21. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerjack101 View Post
    the Million Dollar Fish tourism campaign,
    Certainly makes me want to go touristing around the top end.

  22. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post
    Horrible,nasty creatures
    They used to peck the foil tops off the milk bottles and steal the cream at the top. My brother got a nasty peck to the head when he walked under a treee with nesting magpies.
    They have them in Fiji, too. Very very tasty

  23. #198
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    A man has been pictured riding a cow down a street in Queensland’s central west.Longreach resident Angie Broomhall was on her way to work on Wednesday morning when she noticed the unexpected sight of a man riding a cow.
    “Only in Longreach,” Ms Broomhall captioned the photo when she posted it on Facebook.
    The surprising image has since been shared more than 3000 times.
    “This is why I love Longreach,” one woman wrote.



    https://au.news.yahoo.com/mans-unusu...060915915.html

  24. #199
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    ^Looks like hick has another addition to his herd...

  25. #200
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