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  1. #1876
    Thailand Expat
    SiLeakHunt's Avatar
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    currently ploughing through The Naked Lunch, William Buroughs.
    Just finished Nice Mr Nasty by Joseph King, easy enough truish tale of a drug smuggler, and also This thing of Darkness by Harry Thompson, bit of a grind but interesting if you're into natural history.

  2. #1877
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    I've just finished reading 'Tales and travels of a teacher in Thailand' by Jeff Sparks. Some of the situations and teachers he describes are just downright funny. Some lovely descriptions of the countryside too.
    I really must get to the Yasothon rocket festival one day.

  3. #1878
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    Just reading Nick Kent's (former NME music journo) collection of anecdotes and interviews with rock luminaries and icons, such as Iggy Pop, Brian Wilson, Roy Orbison, Neil Young, Sid Vicious, Kurt Cobain, Miles Davis, Syd Barrett, etc., etc.


    Entitled "The Dark Stuff", Kent wrote a lot of these pieces at the peak of his powers in the 70's and 80's so there is a weird retrospective quality about some of the chapters. As one of the vanguard of Rolling Stone hangers on and junkies, Kent has certainly a lot of inside knowledge and tremendous fascination with the subjects of his musings. Some real insights and comic gold in this book.

  4. #1879
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Everybody Lies - Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

    I highly recommend this book - this is about the things that are revealed from googles dataset - the only place where people really tell the truth is googles search box

    Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our world—provided we ask the right questions.

    By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information—unprecedented in history—can tell us a great deal about who we are—the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable.
    American Shaolin - Matthew Polly

    I quite enjoyed this book about a young american who went to shaolin , china to learn kungfu - easy to read and quite funny in parts

    Bill Bryson meets Bruce Lee in this raucously funny story of one scrawny American’s quest to become a kung fu master at China’s legendary Shaolin Temple. Growing up a ninety-pound weakling tormented by bullies in the schoolyards of Kansas, young Matthew Polly dreamed of one day journeying to the Shaolin Temple in China to become the toughest fighter in the world, like Caine in his favorite 1970s TV series, Kung Fu. While in college, Matthew decided the time had come to pursue this quixotic dream before it was too late. Much to the dismay of his parents, he dropped out of Princeton to spend two years training with the legendary sect of monks who invented kung fu and Zen Buddhism.

    Hun Sen's Cambodia - Sebastian Strangio

    a bit of a dry read , but worth it for the detailed charting of the cambodian political circus and the roles of the govts of china , france , usa and NGOs in the tortuous path of cambodia over the last 40 years

    To many in the West, the name Cambodia still conjures up indelible images of destruction and death, the legacy of the brutal Khmer Rouge regime and the terror it inflicted in its attempt to create a communist utopia in the 1970s. Sebastian Strangio, a journalist based in the capital city of Phnom Penh, now offers an eye-opening appraisal of modern-day Cambodia in the years following its emergence from bitter conflict and bloody upheaval.
    A Soldier on the Southern Front - Emilio Lussu

    this was an interesting book about the Italians fighting in WW1 in the north of italy

    A rediscovered Italian masterpiece chronicling the author's experience as an infantryman, newly translated and reissued to commemorate the centennial of World War I. Taking its place alongside works by Ernst JŸnger, Robert Graves, and Erich Maria Remarque, Emilio Lussu's memoir is one of the most affecting accounts to come out of the First World War. A classic in Italy but virtually unknown in the English-speaking world, it reveals, in spare and detached prose, the almost farcical side of the war as seen by a Sardinian officer fighting the Austrian army on the Asiago plateau in northeastern Italy, the alpine front so poignantly evoked by Ernest Hemingway in "A Farewell to Arms.

    Fatal System Error - Joseph Menn

    an ok book if you are interested in how much is going on in the background as you watch pr0n on xhamster

    Joseph Menn’s third book, "Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who are Bringing Down the Internet," was published in the US in January 2010 and in the UK in February 2010 by PublicAffairs Books. Part true-life thriller and part expose, it became an immediate bestseller, with Menn interviewed on national television and radio programs in the US, Canada and elsewhere. Menn has spoken at major security conferences on his findings, which include hard evidence that the governments of Russia and China are protecting and directing the behavior of some of the world’s worst cyber-criminals.
    “Fatal System Error accurately reveals the secretive global cyber cartels and their hidden multibillion-dollar business, proving cybercrime does pay and pays well,”
    Warren Olson - Thai Private Eye

    easy read with some interesting insights about thailand

    For more than a decade, the intrepid Warren Olson trawled the mean streets of Bangkok and the lesser-known corners of the Land of Smiles. His brief? To uncover unsavoury truths about Thai bargirl lovers, philandering spouses, insurance fraud and scam artists of various stripes. He was a private eye prying into nooks and crannies few dared to explore and, along the way, he uncovered fascinating secrets of Thais and foreigners engaged in no good.

  5. #1880
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    The Force by Don Winslow: a summer reading who-dun-it, tense and tightly packed action in this crime novel...

  6. #1881
    Molecular Mixup
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    Everybody Lies - Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

    I highly recommend this book - this is about the things that are revealed from googles dataset - the only place where people really tell the truth is googles search box

    Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our world—provided we ask the right questions.

    By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information—unprecedented in history—can tell us a great deal about who we are—the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable.
    American Shaolin - Matthew Polly

    I quite enjoyed this book about a young american who went to shaolin , china to learn kungfu - easy to read and quite funny in parts

    Bill Bryson meets Bruce Lee in this raucously funny story of one scrawny American’s quest to become a kung fu master at China’s legendary Shaolin Temple. Growing up a ninety-pound weakling tormented by bullies in the schoolyards of Kansas, young Matthew Polly dreamed of one day journeying to the Shaolin Temple in China to become the toughest fighter in the world, like Caine in his favorite 1970s TV series, Kung Fu. While in college, Matthew decided the time had come to pursue this quixotic dream before it was too late. Much to the dismay of his parents, he dropped out of Princeton to spend two years training with the legendary sect of monks who invented kung fu and Zen Buddhism.

    Hun Sen's Cambodia - Sebastian Strangio

    a bit of a dry read , but worth it for the detailed charting of the cambodian political circus and the roles of the govts of china , france , usa and NGOs in the tortuous path of cambodia over the last 40 years

    To many in the West, the name Cambodia still conjures up indelible images of destruction and death, the legacy of the brutal Khmer Rouge regime and the terror it inflicted in its attempt to create a communist utopia in the 1970s. Sebastian Strangio, a journalist based in the capital city of Phnom Penh, now offers an eye-opening appraisal of modern-day Cambodia in the years following its emergence from bitter conflict and bloody upheaval.
    A Soldier on the Southern Front - Emilio Lussu

    this was an interesting book about the Italians fighting in WW1 in the north of italy

    A rediscovered Italian masterpiece chronicling the author's experience as an infantryman, newly translated and reissued to commemorate the centennial of World War I. Taking its place alongside works by Ernst JŸnger, Robert Graves, and Erich Maria Remarque, Emilio Lussu's memoir is one of the most affecting accounts to come out of the First World War. A classic in Italy but virtually unknown in the English-speaking world, it reveals, in spare and detached prose, the almost farcical side of the war as seen by a Sardinian officer fighting the Austrian army on the Asiago plateau in northeastern Italy, the alpine front so poignantly evoked by Ernest Hemingway in "A Farewell to Arms.

    Fatal System Error - Joseph Menn

    an ok book if you are interested in how much is going on in the background as you watch pr0n on xhamster

    Joseph Menn’s third book, "Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who are Bringing Down the Internet," was published in the US in January 2010 and in the UK in February 2010 by PublicAffairs Books. Part true-life thriller and part expose, it became an immediate bestseller, with Menn interviewed on national television and radio programs in the US, Canada and elsewhere. Menn has spoken at major security conferences on his findings, which include hard evidence that the governments of Russia and China are protecting and directing the behavior of some of the world’s worst cyber-criminals.
    “Fatal System Error accurately reveals the secretive global cyber cartels and their hidden multibillion-dollar business, proving cybercrime does pay and pays well,”
    Warren Olson - Thai Private Eye

    easy read with some interesting insights about thailand

    For more than a decade, the intrepid Warren Olson trawled the mean streets of Bangkok and the lesser-known corners of the Land of Smiles. His brief? To uncover unsavoury truths about Thai bargirl lovers, philandering spouses, insurance fraud and scam artists of various stripes. He was a private eye prying into nooks and crannies few dared to explore and, along the way, he uncovered fascinating secrets of Thais and foreigners engaged in no good.

    So you are reading six books right now !

  7. #1882
    fat cnut SKkin's Avatar
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    Just finished The Patriarch which dispelled some notions I'd had about Joseph Kennedy(if the book is accurate and true). Very interesting read. Fer instance I'd thought previously that the bulk of Joe Kennedy's fortune had been made from bootlegging, according to the book, not so.



    Just starting on this one:

    Last edited by SKkin; 18-06-2017 at 09:01 PM.

  8. #1883
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue
    So you are reading six books right now !
    that is just part of the reading list in the last couple of months - I thought I would list ones worth reading

    I like to look in this thread for something interesting - but it does not get many posts often until it is bumped

  9. #1884
    Molecular Mixup
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by blue
    So you are reading six books right now !
    that is just part of the reading list in the last couple of months - I thought I would list ones worth reading

    I like to look in this thread for something interesting - but it does not get many posts often until it is bumped
    oh ok
    American Shaolin - Matthew Polly looks interesting

  10. #1885
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    Re-reading Class by Jilly Cooper. First published in 1979. Some interesting changes since then,

    Dirk Cussler - The treasure of Khan. Long winded but interesting.

    Martin Johnson - The Autobiography. Cracking good read for sports lovers.

  11. #1886
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    Reading several








  12. #1887
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    kmart's Avatar
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    Funniest book I've read in ages. Probably since the author John Niven's amazing debut "Kill Your Friends". This is his second published novel that I have somehow managed to miss up to now.

    Centered around the sport of golf, and the protagonist's amazing transformation from a useless hacker to a scratch pro, due to a tee shot hitting him square in the head. Brilliant, even if you don't like the sport.


  13. #1888
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    " A Legacy of Spies" to be published in September is John Le Carre's latest, and probably last, book to feature George Smiley in a themed plot encompassing all the novels featuring him.

    Just a heads up for all those who needed closure after Smiley's People but never got it....

  14. #1889
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Just finished "The Afghan Campaign: A Novel" by Steven Pressfield. The lot of a foot soldier in Alexander's Afghan campaign. Really excellent. Moving on to his book about the Spartans.

  15. #1890
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    "Walking with the Buddha" Thich Nhat Hanh

  16. #1891
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    Just finished "The Afghan Campaign: A Novel" by Steven Pressfield. The lot of a foot soldier in Alexander's Afghan campaign. Really excellent. Moving on to his book about the Spartans.
    A recommendation I have made to many who have all been thankful:

    "The Walled Orchard" and " Goatsong" by Tom Holt. Some editions combine both books. Ancient Greece will never be the same again and if you are like me you will probably devour the books in one sitting.

  17. #1892
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    TheVenture of Islam
    Conscience and History in a World Civilization
    MARSHALL G. S. HODGSON

    A three volume history by an academic. heavy going so far.

  18. #1893
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Confessions of a Yakuza - Junichi Saga

    this was an interesting read - covering the period between 1920 and 1960

    not a huge amount of detail , but reasonable

    Confessions of a Yakuza (浅草博徒一代 Asakusa bakuto ichidai) is a book by Japanese doctor and author Junichi Saga (1991). It recounts a series of stories from the life of his patient Eiji Ijichi, a former Yakuza boss, as told in the last months of his life.[1][2][3]

    The book starts with the teenage Ijichi running away from his family home in Utsunomiya to Tokyo, to find a judge's mistress who he was having an affair with. The book follows Ijichi through his first job at a family coal merchant's in the then district of Fukagawa, his various mistresses and treatment for syphilis, the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake, his initiation into the gang that controlled gambling in the Asakusa entertainment area, his various stretches in prison, his overseas service in occupied Korea in the 1920s, his rise to the boss of the gang, and his experiences during and after World War II.

    The book paints a colourful picture of life in Japan in the first half of the 20th century, the structure and customs of a yakuza gang, gambling sessions, prison and army life.

    The English translation of the book initially was published under the title "THE GAMBLER'S TALE: A Life in Japan's Underworld."

  19. #1894
    Thailand Expat
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    Castaneda- The Active Side of Infinity

  20. #1895
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton
    Just finished "The Afghan Campaign: A Novel" by Steven Pressfield. The lot of a foot soldier in Alexander's Afghan campaign. Really excellent.
    I think you can really soak up Robert Kaplan. All his books transer. Timeless..

    https://www.amazon.com/Robert-D.-Kaplan/e/B000APBESC

  21. #1896
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
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    On the second part of Peter Ackroyd's 'History of England'.



    I'd thought this was a part of our glorious isle's history with which I was relatively familiar, but the granular detail which Ackroyd reveals still elucidates.

    I hope he gets to the post-brexit era before one or both of us kick/s the bucket.

  22. #1897
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    Waterloo by Bernard Cornwell was a good read while waiting for the plane...

  23. #1898
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    "Russka" by Edward Rutherfurd. A novel of Russia spanning 1800 years. 900 pages long. Great book, as are all of his historical novels.

  24. #1899
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    I am reading Tich Nhat Hanh "Peace is every step"
    I grate mind and soul of our generation that really needs to be appreciated more

  25. #1900
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonx View Post
    I grate mind and soul of our generation that really needs to be appreciated more
    Perhaps with your reviews on the cover...

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