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Thread: THE Blues

  1. #101
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  2. #102
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by withnallstoke View Post
    It's important to know where it all began.


    That was cute, but if anyone has any question where the blues might have originated from they might try starting off with Field Hollers:

    Field Hollers first developed in the cotton and rice fields during the slavery era. Desired for their familiarity with rice cultivation, as they had been doing it on " the Waccamaw [a plantation district] since the eighteenth century," Low Country slaves cleared plantation land that resembled Africa (Joyner 1984:41). In an attempt to fulfill the overseer's rigorous demands, slaves continued efficient African practices of harvesting when they came to America. Field Hollers emerged from this context. In order to enforce cooperative work and help numb the mental pain of their bondage, slaves sang group work songs, known today as field hollers.

    Similar to spirituals, field hollers followed the "call and response" model. One of the more respected field hands would lead the workers in a song, while others responded in sync with the rhythmic tone of the call. The task at hand determined the tempo and work pace. During slavery, Africans (those born in Africa) sung songs that remind them of their homeland, while African-Americans (those born in America with African ancestry) sung about the hardships during and after enslavement. This was a theme seen often in the lyrics of blues songs, a form that developed at the turn of the 20th Century. Blues incorporated both the rhythmic patterns of field hollers and their subject matter to form its unique sound.


    no that wasn't a field holler
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth
    Field Hollers

    Uploaded on 9 Apr 2008
    La première cargaison d'esclaves débarque en Louisiane en 1720 (1619, pour les Etats cotonniers anglosaxons de Virginie et Caroline du sud) .... selon la religion de leurs nouveaux maitres, les Noirs du continent auront des destins culturels et musicaux différents .... Dans la catholique et permissive Louisiane, l'esclave se voyant accordé le droit de danser ....,




    Uploaded on 20 Apr 2011
    A field holler sung by Joe Savage, former muleskinner and Parchman Farm inmate, on the levee in Greenville, Mississippi. Shot by Alan Lomax, Worth Long, and John Bishop, on August 22, 1978. For more information about the American Patchwork filmwork, Alan Lomax, and his collections, visit Association for Cultural Equity. [02.04.19]




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    Quote Originally Posted by Koojo
    Anyone got, 'Collins, Cray and Copeland'?


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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth
    but if anyone has any question where the blues might have originated from they might try starting off with Field Hollers:
    And then take the night train up to the windy city where it became 'electrified'.
    Here's an Grammy award winning documentary on Chicargo blues


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  8. #108
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteady View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth
    but if anyone has any question where the blues might have originated from they might try starting off with Field Hollers:
    'electrified'
    little more from NPR: Turning Up The Volume On The Electric Blues : NPR

    Blues is so much a part of the fabric of American music and American culture — not only as a defined musical form, but also as a springboard for all kinds of creativity — that it seems crazy to try to encapsulate it in any way. Bear Family Records, though, has just released a 12-disc survey of electric blues called Plug It In! Turn It Up! that does a great job of illuminating one particular aspect of the blues.

    That said, if you want to hear the first blues solo recorded on an electric guitar — "Floyd's Guitar Blues," the first track on the first disc — it's not very good. Floyd Smith was a member of the Kansas City band Andy Kirk and His Twelve Clouds of Joy, and cut "Floyd's Guitar Blues" on March 16, 1939, using techniques that Hawaiian guitarists had made famous, although he seems to be playing a standard guitar. The record was a sensation, and many years later, Chuck Berry cut a version of it called "Blues for Hawaiians."

    But the first electric-blues guitar star was, no question, T-Bone Walker. Aaron Thibeaux Walker was from Dallas, and by 1950, when he made "Strollin' With Bones," he'd been a star for eight years. He'd influenced just about any young kid who could afford an amplifier and wanted to go out on the theater circuit, fronting a band with horns. But that wasn't the only place the electric guitar was showing up.

    Country guitarist Ernest Tubb always said that the reason his band started using electric instruments was to be heard over the noise in the bars it played, and that's probably why Muddy Waters plugged in after moving from Mississippi to Chicago. His 1948 record "I Can't Be Satisfied" is clearly a tune he'd played on an acoustic at one point, and it shows the beginnings of the tone that would make him famous. The discovery that an amplifier could distort an instrument's tone in a good way was made in Chicago's bars, and turned the harmonica into the poor man's saxophone in the hands of a master like Little Walter.

    The tune "Juke" — on the second disc — was a smash in 1952, and was as much an inspiration to young harmonica players as any of T-Bone Walker's records had been for guitarists. But Chicago wasn't the only place electric blues was taking over. T-Bone Walker's disciples were all over Texas, too, as evidenced on an album by Fenton Robinson, laying down the licks in Larry Davis' classic "Texas Flood."

    Memphis, too, was a hotbed of electric blues. Pat Hare was only one of the several great guitarists Bobby "Blue" Bland got to work with over the years, and he's in fine style on the 1957 hit "Further On Up the Road." And a Memphis friend of Bland's who didn't record with him until much later deserves mention, too: B.B. King, who, with his electric guitar, went on to tour the world, playing some of the finest blues ever.

    Electric blues' heyday was probably between 1957 and 1965, by which time its audience was aging and younger people were turning to soul music. It's become a cliché to say that the Rolling Stones and other British bands showed us our own heritage by playing their version of the blues, but the fact is that white people had been playing blues for years — some of them very well indeed.

    Harmonica player and vocalist Paul Butterfield, guitarists Michael Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop and the other members of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band were playing the same bars as their blues idols in 1965 when their record came out, and also backed Bob Dylan during his infamous electric appearance at Newport. The times were a-changin', and the blues were, too.


  9. #109
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Saw this while looking around for more history about the Blues that might be entertaining to some. I thought the sixth story/video (Red, White and Blues) was the best of all seven shows. The Blues | PBS

    The Blues, executive produced by Martin Scorsese, consists of seven feature-length films that capture the essence of the blues while exploring how this art form so deeply influenced music and people the world over.

    The series begins with the journey from Africa to the Mississippi Delta — where the music grew from slaves' field hollers, work songs and spirituals — then travels up the Mississippi River to the juke joints, house parties and recording studios of Memphis and Chicago, and culminates with the emotional embrace of this African-American creation by musicians and people throughout the world.

    "The blues is at once American and worldly," said Martin Scorsese, who began work on the project six years ago. "It's a form of storytelling that is so universal that it has inspired people beyond our borders and continues to influence music here and abroad. We're hopeful that the series and YEAR OF THE BLUES will introduce new audiences worldwide to this music and also inspire kids, whether they like rock or hip hop, to better understand the struggles and genius that gave birth to what they listen to today."

    "Our goal never was to produce the definitive work on the blues," Scorsese added. "It was, from the start, to create highly personal and impressionistic films as seen through the eyes of the most creative directors around with a passion for this music."
    The Blues is the culmination of a great ambition for Scorsese — to honor the music he loves, to preserve its legacy and to work closely with talented feature film directors united in their desire to celebrate this art.

    Go behind the scenes for more information on The Blues, with film synopses, director bios and transcripts, video clips, musician bios, and a discography for each film.

    Feel Like Going Home: Director Martin Scorsese pays homage to the Delta blues. Musician Corey Harris travels through Mississippi and on to West Africa, exploring the roots of the music. The film celebrates the early Delta bluesmen through original performances (including Willie King, Taj Mahal, Otha Turner, and Ali Farka Toure) and rare archival footage (featuring Son House, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker).


    The Soul of a Man: Director Wim Wenders explores the lives of his favorite blues artists — Skip James, Blind Willie Johnson, and J. B. Lenoir — in a film that is part history and part personal pilgrimage. The film tells the story of these artists' lives in music through a fictional film-within-a-film, rare archival footage, and covers of their songs by contemporary musicians, including Bonnie Raitt, Lucinda Williams, Lou Reed, Eagle Eye Cherry, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Cassandra Wilson, Garland Jeffreys, Los Lobos, and others.


    The Road to Memphis: Director Richard Pearce traces the musical odyssey of blues legend B.B. King in a film that pays tribute to the city that gave birth to a new style of blues. Pearce's homage to Memphis features original performances by B.B. King, Bobby Rush, Rosco Gordon and Ike Turner, as well as historical footage of Howlin' Wolf and Rufus Thomas.


    The Warming by the Devil's Fire: Director Charles Burnett presents a tale about a young boy's encounter with his family in Mississippi in the 1950s, and intergenerational tensions between the heavenly strains of gospel and the devilish moans of the blues.


    Godfathers and Sons (if you’re in Thailand you might not be able to view the third segment): Director Marc Levin travels to Chicago with hip-hop legend Chuck D (of Public Enemy) and Marshall Chess (son of Leonard Chess and heir to the Chess Records legacy) to explore the heyday of Chicago blues as they unite to produce an album that seeks to bring veteran blues players together with contemporary hip hop musicians. Along with never-before-seen archival footage of Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, are original performances by Koko Taylor, Otis Rush, Magic Slim, Ike Turner, and Sam Lay.


    Red, White & Blues: Director Mike Figgis joins musicians such as Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Tom Jones, performing and talking about the music of the early sixties British invasion that reintroduced the blues sound to America.


    Piano Blues: Director — and piano player — Clint Eastwood explores his life-long passion for piano blues, using a treasure trove of rare historical footage in addition to interviews and performances by such living legends as Pinetop Perkins and Jay McShann, as well as Dave Brubeck and Marcia Ball.

    Last edited by S Landreth; 05-02-2013 at 07:02 AM.

  10. #110
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    Damn but this thread just keeps on giving

  11. #111
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    Sure does. Some great stuff here.

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    Last night I saw Willie Salomon at Boys Blues Bar here in Chiang Mai. He was a real surprise, had a great time. He also performed together with Bert Deivert (who played electric mandolin) another good blues musician.






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  14. #114
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  15. #115
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    The (55th) Grammy’s were held last night and the Best Blues Album nominees; with a song from each album, are listed below.

    BEST BLUES ALBUM

    33 1/3
    Shemekia Copeland


    Locked Down
    Dr. John


    Let It Burn
    Ruthie Foster


    And Still I Rise
    Heritage Blues Orchestra


    Bring It On Home
    Joan Osborne



    The winner:

    Lock Down by Dr. John


    GRAMMY.com | Winners

  16. #116
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Bit early, but I might be busy next week.

    I'm In I'm Out And I'm Gone - Ben Harper/Charlie Musselwhite

    Just released and well worth a listen.


    Another one from Sirius, Rockers doing the Blues (more of a spiritual)


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  18. #118
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    Last edited by Mid; 04-03-2013 at 03:35 PM.

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    Alvin Lee (born Graham Alvin Barnes, 19 December 1944 – 6 March 2013)






  • #121
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    Damn , he was the catalyst for this thread

    RIP Alvin


  • #122
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  • #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camel Toe View Post
    see your url ain't pretty ....................

    you need to post the vid title into youtube and find the base url

    thus


  • #124
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  • Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  • #125
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    ^ Good taste mate!

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